POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

Cadillac STS

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Why not just mill the hex in?

Edit I see everyone is making these I guess I’ll make one soon too. I’m just confused why everybody is using socket and not just milling the hexes in?

Much easier, looks nicer, wear resistance...

Can use 2 sections of same socket to make it look uniform.
 
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BGHansen

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Why not just mill the hex in?

Edit I see everyone is making these I guess I’ll make one soon too. I’m just confused why everybody is using socket and not just milling the hexes in?
Here's a build I did to make them as you suggested. I used 1/2" thick aluminum and put the hexes in via CNC. That was lots quicker than using a rotary table and doing it manually.

The plus side for the socket method is speed. So much quicker to machine a round hole than what I did with the CNC.

Bruce

 

JimDawson

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Added a light to my lathe today. This was a quickie, the whole process took about 10 minutes.


I chose this particular one because of the mounting style and the gooseneck length, also I wanted the biggest magnifying lens that was available. I didn't want one that was too long or too short. And the cord enters above the attaching screw so it will flush mount. Typical Chinese cheap construction, but the gooseneck seems to be pretty robust.
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Stuff is never quite right as is comes out of the box. So like any good machinist make some modifications, that's why we have machines....Right? :grin:

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Then attach the modified mount to the carriage. It needs to move with the carriage, but I didn't want it moving with the cross slide. And if I do decide that it needs to move with the cross slide, that's an easy modification.
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And installed. Nice heavy machined aluminum housing. 2.25 magnification seems to be about right for my old eyes, the light is OK but could be a bit brighter, but better than what I had. Just the overhead 4ft LED shop light put shadows in places I wanted to see, especially when I leaned over the work for a closer inspection. We'll see how this works out. It also doubles as a chip shield.

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The side view. Cord is zip tied back to the gooseneck to try to avoid snagging on stringy chips.

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And up out of the way.
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This switch module is most likely the first failure point. It dims and has 3 different color temperatures. Brightest setting and bright white seems to be the best, I would be happy with just an ON/OFF switch. The lamp is powered by a USB cable and a 5V USB output wall wart.

1583972547835.png
 

Franko

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More tweaking on the music workstation. I've always wanted front panel power outlets on my workstations.
Handy for chargers, occasionally used equipment, and the vacuum cleaner.
All the outlets on the power conditioners are on the back, so to plug something in I had pull the rig away from the wall to access the back.

I had a nice surge protected power strip with horizontal plugs so wall warts will fit.
I fabricated adapters so I can mount it on the rack rails.

IMG_1410.JPG

They are simple and quick. Just 1.5" and 1" aluminum 1/8" angle screwed together.
Someday, I will finish the press bender I started years ago.

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IMG_1408.JPG
 

GreatOldOne

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I installed a portable extractor setup based on a standard 100mm diameter inline bathroom extractor fan, and some 3D printed parts I designed. It hangs up behind my mill when I'm not using it, but when I am it gets plugged into the 3d printed port screwed on to the wall of the shed (which leads outside to a hooded outlet on the exterior), and then the inlet is held with a mag base indicator holder. I can use it on the Mill and the Lathe, and probably when I'm soldering on the work bench too.

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GoceKU

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Well because of the coronavirus i got 2 weeks off work so i have some time mid day mid week. So i got to work, first on the list was to modify my welder, from the factory it had very small plastic wheels, one broke and the axle bent. Couple of weeks back i bought couple of big steel rim wheels and today i mounted them, i had to extend the front leg, i just use an off cut of some tubing. Now it rolls effortlessly. After this i got busy cleaning this part of the garage. Just as a was finishing i got a call from the machine shop in skopje they have a spot in their schedule so i loaded the engine block and heads and went there. I arrived just as they are finishing for the day so i left the block and heads for them to resurface them and will wait for their call.
IMG_20200312_125133.jpg IMG_20200312_152547.jpg
 

GoceKU

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Today i spent most of my day searching for car parts but i also found some time to do some machining, i need to make me an heavy duty engine stand so i can build the engine for my 607, i started with cleaning up a thick piece of pipe on my lathe, then i found a piece the will be a close fit and bored and cut it to fit snugly, this will be the rotisserie part of my engine stand.
IMG_20200312_170102.jpg IMG_20200312_173925.jpg IMG_20200312_175244_1.jpg
 

finsruskw

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Worked on a batch of clutch throw out levers for narrow frame Cubs today.
Used thicker mat'l that the original parts. Have yet to dress the legs on 4 of them and drill the holes for the cross pins. Tomorrow is another day!

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mmcmdl

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Hey Fin , you know where you can sell them ! ;) I used to make parts for the Supers years back , it was pretty fun .
 

silverhawk

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I finally had a chance to get an old wood lathe stand built. I saw a video by "Wesley Treat" about adding castors to a welding table (here, if you want to know), and wanted to implement something similar on my wood lathe stand. It works pretty slick, and I'm going to do the same for my south bend heavy 10. I don't have a lot of room, so I can't bolt it down. That will allow me to move tools out when I need them. First, the stand (from a distance) :



Then a picture along the bottom with the stand seated :



And finally a picture along the bottom showing the legs suspended with the arm down :



It's workable with a single foot. I still need a locking mechanism, and I still need to make a spacer and lock those front arms in place (they can slide off the pins pretty easily right now). Then I can add the lathe itself.
 

finsruskw

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I had a heck of a time figuring out where to make the bends by trial and error. There is probably a formula for doing that so the outside of the "U" will be the correct measurement each time.

I had to mill some off each side to get the right spacing to fit between the lips on the TO arm.
Another learning experience!
 

finsruskw

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T & A got me pretty close on the 2nd try!
Srarted with a blank of 3/16 x 1, 3.5" long.
My die is 4"X 4" w/4 different "vee's" and is an actual cutoff from a huge press brake and HEAVY!!~
Did I mention that it is heavy??
The press is home made.
Inserted the blank to within .75" of the edge and bent 90*
Did this on each end.

My "U" turned out a hair too wide so I had to mill some off each side to make it fit inside the arm as well as the end of the legs to get the same length and fit.
Hated to have to do that as it thinned the portion that supports the clevis pin and that's where the wear happens and the reason for making them from thicker mat's. However, eve with doing that I am still thicker than the OEM parts.
I wonder what .80" offset would result in?

Today, I have to figure out how I am going to hold the part to drill the 3/8" pin hole and do it repeatedly w/the same results. Not having a square outside corner might make this somewhat of a challenge.
 

silverhawk

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I installed the electric choke on the Holley carburetor today (except for the last wire). The manual choke that was on there :



And the electric choke installed (all except the power wire) :


Now I know how I need to route my fuel line for better clearance (and to get it away from the engine to avoid heat soak).
 

GreatOldOne

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I did this yesterday... I managed to straighten (as much as I could) the bottom members of my second hand hydraulic press, and managed to get the bows out of the table where the previous owner had used the wrong side of it when pressing something and dished in both sides. Oh, and I found some thick heavy stock and cut two new press plates to be used on the table the right way. :) 808E592E-C98A-450D-A0D4-2B8BFCC90D54.jpeg A26C221D-4E5F-4E02-83EB-B9A42E29B8E3.jpeg
 

Radials

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A neighbor was saying his Duro drill press was acting up and brought it over for me to look at. Removing the belt cover I saw that the spindle pulley had a rather noticeable nod to it and could freely tip in any direction. After spending some time to remove a broken tensioning bolt on the motor mount I was able to release the belt which was as tight as a banjo. (That probably at least had a little to do with this problem) The pulley bore was totally wallowed out and the spindle had some scaring/ galling.

I was able to clean the spindle up and got a measurement for the bushing. The pulley was bored large enough to fit a bushing in while trying to leave as much wall thickness as possible. The bushing was just made from some 1018 and pressed in. All back together now and once again in service.

The damage:
Drill Press Damaged Pulley.JPG

The fix:
Drill Press Pulley Fix.JPG
 

finsruskw

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Here's where they fit on a narrow frame Cub cadet.
It's the part behind the black lever with the pin through it, you can just see the top of it.
NIce to have all the wear and slop gone and a nice crisp clutch operation once again.
 

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extropic

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Truck was leaking gear oil so I pulled the transaxle, split the diff from engine, changed pilot bushing(needed to make a driver) put the rebuilt diff and transmission on and ready to put back in the truck tomorrow
Let's see the truck.
That's cool, keeping an old Corvair on the road.
 

GoceKU

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Today i started my day with a bit of fabrication, i dig in my scrap conner and found some thick wall tubing and started cutting and welding, i joined the feet first then turn them around and welded them from undernight. For the upright i used a round piece of tubing and braced it with two rebars from the back side, i built in a slight angle in the upright to help with the weight transfer at the top i welded on the sleeve i machined couple of days ago. To test it i stick in it a long piece of an car axle and stood up on in with all my 115 kg and it didn't even moved. I need to do all my dirty work before i start cleaning and assembling the engine block. At this point i stopped cleaned up and went in search of car parts witch its starting to be even more difficult because of the coronavirus some of the businesses are not working. This will be an engine assembly stand for the V6 hdi out of my 607.
IMG_20200314_124451_1.jpg IMG_20200314_124459.jpg IMG_20200314_124427.jpg
 

hman

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Radials -

Godawful looking damage, nice looking repair! You've got a very lucky neighbor.
 

silverhawk

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Forgive the burr in the following pictures - I need a new endmill.

I finally got the stainless steel hex stock to start building my fuel line. It's a 7/8" hex bar. I cut off a chunk about 1.25" long and chucked it into the lathe, faced and chamfered the cut, flipped it, drilled and chamfered the front end.



Then I removed it from the lathe and got it in the tool makers vise perfectly vertical, then set the whole tool makers vise into the big angle vise on my mini mill. I faced it down to a surface that was large enough to handle it (while keeping the other face also big enough), and then drilled an intersecting hole.




Once that was done, I removed the tool makers vise and locked that one onto the table. This allowed me to drill a third hole that was parallel to the first one done on the lathe, again intersecting in the middle.



I did a test fit.




Now I need to degrease/clean, bend the tubes into position (and get the right lengths), then break out the jewelry solder and lock it all together.
 

JimDawson

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A rare video of my CNC lathe in action. I could run this part with a squirt of WD-40 rather than flood coolant. Took this video just before I changed the setup over to another job. 1 1/2-18 thread, 6061 aluminum tube.

Turn, Face, Clearance Groove, Inside Chamfer, and OD Thread. All in 53 seconds. And my son complains it takes too much time. :confused 3:

 
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mattthemuppet2

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did my very first weld at the weekend EVER! Was super exciting
Unfortunately, now I want a welder


Anyway, making some new vise jaws for my HF 4x6 bandsaw. The current ones have pi$$ed me off since I got it and I have a 2x2 stick of QCTP holders I can't cut as the jaws don't extend close enough to the blade to hold the work.

So cut up a nice piece of 3/8" thick angle iron I found at the side of the road (I think), then milled some slots, drilled some holes etc etc. Finally I used my friend's MIG welder and flux core wire (he doesn't have gas for MIG) to weld some braces to the back of the angle iron for some stiffening. Huge amounts of fun. I might need to help him make a welding table as the plastic picnic table he uses started melting towards the end of the job.

I picked one of the nicer welds for a picture

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here's what they look like compared to the original moving jaw
IMG_9332.JPG

haven't finished them yet (having some issues with tram on the mill) but had to put them back on the bandsaw to cut some material for a cargo rack tongue extension. Here you can also see a "not quite QR yet" jack screw to prevent the moving jaw from wracking when holding short stuff. I love my bandsaw - made a coffee AND had a crap while it cut this piece.
IMG_9334.JPG

also split the nut to take a whole load of slop out of the moving jaw
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and made a T-nut for the fixed jaw as the original set up was a nut and bolt, with the nut underneath the saw. Figured I might as well fix that annoyance while I was at it
IMG_9330.JPG

now I have to record some lectures so I can get back to my rack project..
 

pdentrem

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I cut the triangles from a piece of Alcoa .190 plate. Shaped them against a 60 grit sanding disk (they do get hot). Drilled and tapped the three outer holes for 8X32 Nylon screws and clearance holes for the brass 8X32 countersunk screws that are not tight to allow the triangles to rock and self level against the back of the mirror. Now I have to cut and weld in the edge support brackets after setting the mirror in place for measurements.
Pierre
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