POTD- PROJECT OF THE DAY: What Did You Make In Your Shop Today?

GreatOldOne

R'lyeh Engineering Works
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2014
Messages
314
I striped down, cleaned and rebuilt the latest mitutoyo toy in the workshop - a 329-316 digital depth mic. Which can probably serve as a hammer in a pinch. I’m guessing late 70s vintage from the over engineering and three battery design. It was very tight - something was binding up inside so much that you couldn’t rotate the thimble with the ratchet without it slipping. Now it’s silky smooth. :)
F41CB4D7-7652-41A7-A170-1B7F09B8E962.jpeg 31049DD0-4C3D-4843-A245-31E27C02A4BD.jpeg
whilst I was at it I got the surface plate out and dialled in the zero on it and my other depth mic.
4F5B4ABE-ACAC-404A-8A04-999C1B8EC112.jpeg
 

GreatOldOne

R'lyeh Engineering Works
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2014
Messages
314
Today I finished off my solid tool post by making a new stud - I used the one that came with the QTP when I bought it, but it’s not a very good fit (and it’s the reason it’s not on the compound). This is M10 each end, but the shaft is 10.5mm. Used the extractor on the lathe for the fast time as well.


5A6B0C33-D3DB-4712-98A8-C3E55B1C8D0F.jpeg F6AD856E-4EAB-4D47-8279-550D3453EDF0.jpeg 794886F3-9B09-4EF7-8DD3-D53CA7CFAFA7.jpeg
Why so fussy of .5mm? Well... it means that the sides of the QTP align exactly with the solid base. So all I need do to ensure that the QTP is square to the work / chuck etc is hold a 123 block up to the side of the base and tighten the nut. The base is aligned spot on with the cross slide, so everything works out well.

3A40AFE2-AB35-4569-833F-5C8C2B61051B.jpeg C0F0A125-6BA0-410B-897F-5EB2138D2B04.jpeg 53D97196-D880-4212-801E-31AD8B84391F.jpeg

Oh - I also made a list of all the other things to be done whilst the apocalypse reigns. ;)
6B5D04A2-B6CF-4112-A5CA-764B2683D119.jpeg
 
Last edited:

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,547
POTD was more progress on the enclosure for my Tormach mill. The enclosure will have a 6" table that overhangs the front of the mill. I have stainless steel tubing that runs along the front edge which needed to be braced back to the chip pan for stiffness.

There are 4 brass plugs in the front of the chip pan that can be removed for anchor points for a lower support bracket. I started by making new ones out of brass. Plan was to make bushings with a threaded inside hole for screwing brackets to. They mic'd at around 0.629" or very close to 16 mm or a touch over 5/8". The thread pitch was spot on to both 1.4 mm or 18 threads/inch. I had some 5/8" brass so went with English plugs: 5/8" OD threaded at 18 threads/inch though they very well could be M16 x 1.4. They mic'd at the same diameter at both ends, so not a pipe thread. Too bad, would have liked to try threading on my Grizzly G0709 lathe with a taper attachment.


Plugged holes in the base of the chip pan
20200330_161734.jpg

Chucked up some 5/8" brass and faced.
20200330_161941.jpg

center drilled
20200330_162015.jpg

tap drilled for 5/16"-18
20200330_162114.jpg

power tapped with a spiral flute tap
20200330_162228.jpg

scratch pass on the OD for the 18 tpi. "Close enough" as I'm guessing it was probably a metric 1.4 mm pitch thread which works out to 18.14 tpi.
20200330_163058.jpg

Used a screw pitch micrometer to measure one of the plugs with a 0.600" pitch diameter.
20200330_163227.jpg

Last pass
20200330_163944.jpg

Low and behold, hit 0.600"!
20200330_164054.jpg

parting off the bushings
20200330_185128.jpg

used a thread repair file at the chucked end that had just been parted. Ran the lathe in reverse and held the file on the back side of the work. That way the file worked itself off the thread.
20200330_185251.jpg

Original plugs to the left, new bushings in the middle. Some 5/16" cap screws for threading in the bushings.
20200330_190942.jpg

New bushings in place. Put a drop of red Loctite on the bushings and ran the cap screws down. I put a piece of masking tape between the washer and the bushing which made removing the cap screws easier; didn't unscrew the bushings.
20200331_150605.jpg


Next step was making some brackets for the bottom support. I used 1 1/2" angle iron for these. Rough cut the length on my band saw, then cleaned up one end on the Bridgeport. Flipped the pieces and cleaned up the opposite side so they were all the same width. Ran a quick CNC routine to cut a radius on the end. Then spot drilled and drilled a through hole for screwing a Creform tube bracket to.


Set the rough cut angle pieces vertically and cleaned up the ends.
20200401_141850.jpg

Ran a CNC routine to cut a radius on the end, then spot drilled holes which were completed on the drill press.
20200401_145558.jpg
20200401_155416.jpg

Assembled two brackets together and drilled the attaching holes to the chip pan on the BP. Spacing is 1.60" on the Tormach chip pan, so matched that on the BP.
20200401_163623.jpg


Screwed the brackets to the Tormach chip pan and attached some braces from the tubing that runs along the front of the mill. Really stiffens things up.

20200401_163633.jpg


Thanks for looking,

Bruce
 
Last edited:

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,547
POTD was more work on the Tormach enclosure. Worked on the lower door tracks this time. The original owner used 1/4" Plexiglas that ran in an extruded aluminum track. I figured on reusing the track. His enclosure had two sliding doors that gave about a 3' opening to the mill. My design is two panels that are hinged on the ends and sliding doors. In use, I'll have 3+ foot sliding doors in front and if I want, can swing them open for a close to 8' access to the front of the mill.

The track slips into a piece of aluminum extrusion. Plan was to screw that extrusion to the bottom of the swinging doors. Started by making some 1/4"-20 nuts that fit the extrusion. Cut the pieces on a bench shear, then drilled and tapped on the drill press.


nuts for the extrusion cut from 1/8" steel plate. Tap drilling.
20200329_154453.jpg

Tapping 1/4"-20 holes on the drill press
20200329_160553.jpg



Made brackets to attach the aluminum track extrusion to the door frames. These are 1/8" aluminum plate cut to size with a bench shear.


Drilled mounting holes on the drill press after cutting to size
20200330_144700.jpg

chamfered the tops with my bench shear
20200330_145250.jpg

brackets, nuts and extrusion.
20200330_151758.jpg


Brackets screwed to a couple of Creform tubing brackets on the bottom of the swinging doors.
20200330_160742.jpg

20200330_160754.jpg

door closed
20200330_160801.jpg

door swung open. The aluminum track will have 1/4" panels in them to close off the mill; slide open for access.
20200330_160813.jpg



Thanks for looking, Bruce
 
Last edited:

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,547
POTD was yet more work on the Tormach enclosure. Worked on the top of the sliding doors. The plan is to use Unistrut for a track for the tops of the sliding doors. The Unistrut was cut to length and screwed to the tops of the swinging door frames.

Went to the lathe to make roller wheels that will run inside the Unistrut. Basically, just bushings made from Delrin. Faced, turned to diameter, shoulder cut to depth and parted. Then flipped the roller wheels and chucked in a collet. Center drilled, drilled a through hole and countersunk for clearance for an attaching cap screw.


Faced and cut the inside roller diameter
20200401_112324.jpg

Turning the OD
20200401_112515.jpg

Parting
20200401_112633.jpg

Flipped the roller wheel and chucked in a collet, center drilled
20200401_112810.jpg

Drilling a 3/8" axle hole
20200401_113044.jpg

Countersinking with a 5/8" end mill
20200401_113139.jpg


Made some hanger brackets from 3/16" aluminum. The roller wheels will attach at the top, plastic sliding doors at the bottom. Did the drilling on the CNC Bridgeport. Really nice to program in the drill locations and make 4 brackets that are spot on to each other.


Hanger brackets made from aluminum, drilling on the BP
20200401_114435.jpg


Hanger bracket and roller wheel in a chunk of Unistrut. The plastic sliding doors will screw to the hanger brackets below the Unistrut.
20200401_115648.jpg


Brackets and rollers in place.
20200401_125118.jpg


Still lots of work to do. The framework of the enclosure is lacking in structure, so will be attaching some angle iron to the rear corner posts and tying it back to the base. Hopefully get that done tomorrow along with the sliding doors.

Thanks for looking, Bruce
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,547
POTD was, you guessed it, more work on the Tormach enclosure. I'm about to the point of attaching the sliding plastic panels to the front doors and was concerned about the stability of the enclosure frame. I hadn't put any diagonal bracing on the vertical tubing which made for a shaky structure. I plan on using the fixed plastic panels on the doors to set them square as they'll be screwed directly to the frame. My concern is if the structure tilts one way or the other, then the doors won't fit. I also have some turnbuckles which may come in service to square up the doors.

I've got a good supply of stainless steel Creform tubing so used that for diagonal bracing. The end brackets are narrower than the wide portion of the brackets so some bushings were needed to space the ends. Otherwise, the tubing on the diagonal braces would interfere with the chip pan and base. Bushing were made from 1" aluminum. Simple lathe job of facing, center drilling, drilling the bushing hole and parting.


Facing the 1" aluminum
20200403_105053.jpg

Center drill
20200403_105130.jpg

1/4" clearance hole
20200403_105259.jpg

parting off
20200403_105504.jpg

A stack of washers would have worked too, but preferred the look of the bushings
20200403_105726.jpg 20200403_105852.jpg


Cut the tubing to length, screwed on the end brackets and screwed the diagonal bracing to the rear vertical tubes and the chip pan/base. Holy cow did it make a difference in stiffness! I was going to do a diagonal from the RH rear tube to the base, but it's not needed. Next steps are hanging the plastic front door panels and moving the controller arm.

Thanks for looking, Bruce


new LH fore/aft brace
20200403_120519.jpg

RH side brace
20200403_120545.jpg

Rear brace. Yes, need to work on managing all of the cords and air lines . . .
20200403_120601.jpg
 
Last edited:

pdentrem

Active User
Registered
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
Messages
2,297
Added some collimation screws to the focuser of the telescope I have been working on. Found the focuser was not square to the mirrors! They are four brass which you can see two in this photo. Filled the hollow space in the casting with Steel Bed from Brownells and drill and tap 6X32.
Oh well, since trapped in the cabin getting some projects done.
Pierre

E3ADA815-2881-47C5-8782-981EECEE40E4.jpeg
 

savarin

Active User
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Aug 22, 2012
Messages
2,617
At least your still working on your scope, I haven't been able to work on mine since Christmas, I have sever withdrawal symptoms, :bawling:
 

mattthemuppet2

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Messages
2,209
made some new jaws for my HF 4x6 bandsaw
IMG_9361.JPG
IMG_9365.JPG

more details here
 

pdentrem

Active User
Registered
Joined
Jan 28, 2011
Messages
2,297
I find it hard to understand why on most of these machines, the jaws never come up to the blade in any position. Always having to cobble together a sub jaw etc etc to make safer cuts. Pierre
 

mattthemuppet2

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Sep 28, 2013
Messages
2,209
I don't know either. The original moving jaw could be shifted closer to the blade, but then the guide rollers would hit it. There was lots of frustration that went into the design of these :)

Also made a cute little gear puller to get a gear off my circular saw motor (doesn't work anymore)
IMG_9367.JPG
IMG_9368.JPG
IMG_9369.JPG

motor still doesn't work after taking it apart further, but at least I have the gear off now!
 

silverhawk

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Messages
401
I finally had the chance to cut my first gear. I'm trying to install a heavy 10 hand lever collet closer, and I wanted to use an original-style gear (one of those long ones). I cut one blank already, but realized I forgot to add the gear width itself, so I had to re-cut it (it was a half inch too short - I might thread the end of the bad blank and add a chunk of metal just to finish this one). Anyway, setup was a bear. I should use a self-centering chuck on the indexing head, but I only had a 4 jaw independent. I finally got it centered, then I got the axis centered for the mill and proceeded to cut :









Now, I had added a boss in there because I wanted to be able to bolt on a plate I can use for a lathe brake (I really don't like putting it in back gears to remove stuck chucks). Because Harbor Freight mini mills don't have room, I had to move everything to the drill press (and change the direction the chuck was holding it to get the boss to the outside). Again, setup was the pain. Once done, three holes that I can tap.





I'm pretty stoked! I only need to cut the keyway now.
 

Surprman

Active User
Registered
Joined
May 6, 2014
Messages
206
I finished my Aloris tool post nut-handle. I made the ball on the handle from 304 stainless today. I plan to “blue” the nut and handle (which are hot rolled steel). Looking forward to not having to look for the wrench every time I want to adjust the tool position.
I did an “oil blueing” treatment to the nut and handle this morning. The part should not see much abrasion/wear and I just wanted a color change and a little rust resistance. I think it came out pretty good for my first time. It was pretty easy too - just heat up gradually until it reached a nice blue/grey and then dunk it in oil to cool down. I used some black epoxy to permanently affix the handle and knob.
 

Attachments

silverhawk

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 6, 2015
Messages
401
I did an “oil blueing” treatment to the nut and handle this morning. The part should not see much abrasion/wear and I just wanted a color change and a little rust resistance. I think it came out pretty good for my first time. It was pretty easy too - just heat up gradually until it reached a nice blue/grey and then dunk it in oil to cool down. I used some black epoxy to permanently affix the handle and knob.
That looks pretty good!
 

Bamban

Active User
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Jul 13, 2014
Messages
1,026
Had to take a break from the barrel work.

Nothing high tech, just a simple 2 collar test bar. 1-1/8 drill rod, 3-1/2 inch aluminum discs from eBay. Bored them to slide through the rod and stop at the knurled section. Pressed the discs to position with the 20 ton shop press. Just for added insurance I spread some retaining compound on the knurling before I pressed the discs into the rod.

The rod ends were drilled and single point cut the centers.

Had a test bar before made from 2 inch bar stock, but a pressing project forced me to sacrifice it.

This new one should last a long time.

20200404_215348.jpg
 

GreatOldOne

R'lyeh Engineering Works
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2014
Messages
314
In the shop, I finally got round to mounting my York vise / Power arm combo that I restored and had been sitting on my bench for god knows how long. I've made some plates that are mounted under the bench with threaded holes for the power arm and the original fixed vise that I had mounted there - that way I can swap them out whenever I want to. The plates are held in place with some counter sunk screws.

IMG_0890.jpeg
IMG_0891.jpeg
IMG_0892.jpeg

Whilst I was doing that, the 3D printer was going in the study - and the first lot of parts for my larger shop vac hose have been sorted out. The parts are held together with the snap ring in the front of the pic, and it allows the two other parts to rotate. It took a while to figure out the correct thread to connect to the barrel of the vac (it's M68x5, but I eventually made it M65.5x5 for a smoother fit - this meant editing the Fusion 360 thread files to create the profile). The 'thread' for the corrugated hose that will go in there is a 2mm triangle section spiral with a pitch of 6mm.

IMG_0896.jpeg IMG_0899.jpeg

I'm now busy printing out the hose cuff that goes on the other end of the hose, along with some tools to connect to it.
 

jwmelvin

Registered
Registered
Joined
Jan 11, 2018
Messages
278
I like those 3D-printed vacuum adapters. The guy who first taught me to machine in the college shop, Fred, said when he retired that his greatest advancement was splitting the vacuum hoses in the middle so clogs could be cleared. He was a huge champion of the vacuum and hated air nozzles, which push chips and grit in deeper.

I made a printed nozzle to clean out my T-slots:
 

Cadillac STS

Active User
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Jul 20, 2012
Messages
877
Nice idea to have the thrust bearing on the QCTP

EDIT: Noticed it about $7 on eBay for a needle thrust bearing like that with 2 washers!
 
Last edited:

terry_g

Active User
Registered
Joined
Jan 21, 2011
Messages
84
I have not posted here in a while. Here is last nights project.
Twenty five years ago I bought A Southbend 10K lathe. One of the jaws was missing for the 3 jaw chuck so I bought a new chuck for it.
I paid almost as much for the chuck as I paid for the lathe. I had a few options but I bought a quality chuck made in Poland.
I remember cringing at the price when I bought it.
About eleven years ago I sold the Southbend and bought a Chinese 12 x 36 lathe. I swapped chucks and gave the new
owner of the Southbend the chuck that came with the Chinese lathe which was also a decent quality chuck.

A few months back I was making some heavy duty washers for a gear puller. I sawed four 3/8" pieces off a chunk of 1 1/4"
round stock and chucked all four of them in the lathe to drill them. When the centre drill hit the washer it spun in the chuck.
Over the years the jaws and the slots in the chuck had worn and the jaws were no longer square in the chuck.

I took some pieces of scrap aluminium from an old cleaning rod and made spacers so I could tighten the chuck jaws with them still open.





I attached a Dremel die grinder to the tool post using rubber bands made from an old motorcycle tire tube.



I fed the grinding wheel back and fourth on the chuck jaws grinding very lightly for the better part of an hour and several beers.





I cleaned up all the abrasive dust and then put a piece of bar stock in the chuck and dialed it with a dial indicator. Zero run-out.
Its probably more accurate now than when I bought it.


Terry
 

ACHiPo

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Feb 2, 2017
Messages
899
All the corona-virus tidying up projects motivated me. I finally got around to getting my 8C collets mounted to my mill. I attached the rack to the bed cover. I needed some counterweight, so I put some hooks on the back to hang wrenches. My lead hammer and parallels further weigh things down so the collet rack doesn't tip forward. Took the opportunity to clean up my collets as well--a little 0000 steel wool and Gibbs Brand Protectant did wonders. IMG_0178.JPG IMG_0179.JPG
 

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,547
POTD (actually a couple of days ago) was putting a table top on the front of the Tormach mill enclosure. Didn't shoot any pictures of the fab process. The top is a piece of Nuvel (solid surface counter top material like Corian, but it's about 3/16" thick) left over from our house construction in 1993. There's a 1" square piece of tubing that sets on the edge of the chip pan, button head cap screws go through the Nuvel, tubing and the chip pan. The front edge simply sets on top of the enclosure tubing.

Thanks for looking, Bruce


Mill side view. Table top sets on a piece of 1" tubing that sets on the edge of the chip pan. The table is 8" deep and is sloped about 1/8" high on the front side so coolant will (hopefully) run back into the chip pan.
20200404_115139.jpg

20200404_115110.jpg

Front view with the enclosure doors removed.
20200404_115102.jpg
 
Last edited:

BGHansen

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Nov 23, 2014
Messages
1,547
POTD was finishing up the sliding/swinging doors for the Tormach. Pretty happy with the end result. The doors slide back and forth very smoothly for quick access to the mill. Pull a couple of pins, swing the doors open and the entire front of the mill is accessible.

There are brackets at the swinging edge of the doors that attach to the front tubing of the enclosure. Plan was to insert a couple of bushings for retaining pins in the doors. Made the bushings from 303 stainless.


Turned some 1" 303 down to 3/4", and a shoulder turned to 1/2"
20200404_154905.jpg

Parted on the band saw, really like my HF 7 x 12 saw
20200404_155037.jpg

Chucked up the bushing in a collet and faced the stand off to height
20200404_161446.jpg

Center drilled with a 3/8" center drill, then a through hole with an F drill (0.257" for some clearance to a 1/4" pin). I went deep on the center drill to get a "free" chamfer lead in on the pin hole.
20200404_162022.jpg


Next step was knocking the 1/2" bushing holes in the Creform brackets. Did that work on the Bridgeport.


Found center side to side with an edge finder and drilled a 1/2" hole through the Creform brackets.
20200404_164746.jpg

Installed the drilled brackets to the enclosure tubing and used the bushing and a 1/4" transfer punch to mark the bottom of the tubing for drilling.
20200405_101733.jpg

Used the bushing and transfer punch in the bracket on the top side to mark the center of the bracket hole for drilling the tubing.
20200405_102320.jpg

Brackets and tubing drilled out, just about ready for the bushings. Didn't shoot pictures of it, but put the bushings in the brackets and set the table top in place. Drilled up through the bushings and through the table top.
20200405_102822.jpg

Bushings in place through the table top and bushings. Clamped a door frame in place and drilled up through the bushing and through the tubing so the holes line up.
20200405_104053.jpg

Bushings through the table top, brackets and enclosure tubing.
20200405_103703.jpg



On to the retaining pins. These were made from 1/4" 303 stainless with 3/4" brass knobs.


Cutting a 1/4"-20 thread on the 1/4" 303 pin.
20200405_110010.jpg

Chucked up and faced some 3/4" 360 brass.
20200405_110721.jpg

Center drill
20200405_110813.jpg

Tap drill for 1/4"-20
20200405_110932.jpg

Tapping the 1/4"-20 knob hole. I really like using a piloted tap wrench on the mill, lathe and drill press. Always keeps the tap on center and square.
20200405_111223.jpg

Knurled, screwed in the pin and parted
20200405_112051.jpg

Chucked up the pin in a collet and faced the top of the knob
20200405_113212.jpg



Final product. As mentioned before, pretty happy how it all came out. The sliding doors give a 3' access to the front of the mill. With a quick pull of a pin, the door swings out of the way for more access.

Thanks for looking, Bruce


Doors slid closed, pins in place.
20200405_113633.jpg

Doors slide open for quick access.
20200405_113641.jpg

Swinging doors closed, door panels open.
20200405_113730.jpg

Pull the two pins and swing open the door for full access.
20200405_113802.jpg
 
Last edited:

FOMOGO

Active User
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Messages
2,237
Bought a Lambrich live center last fall just before we left for the winter. Got a great price on Amazon, believe someone here posted a heads up on it. Anywho, When I received it I noticed it would tighten up when turning it in one direction, so I decided to tear it down and take a look. First order of business was to make a pin wrench to open it up. Found a suitable piece of scrap for the handle, cut off the torch cut side, drilled a hole to fit over the center, did the layout for the pin location and drilled the holes for a light press fit in the wrench. Turned a piece of rod for a slip fit in the holes of the center retaining nut, cut them to length, and pressed them into the wrench. The simple wrench worked great. Disassembled/cleaned all the parts, and found a scared area on the main bearing surface which you can just see in the 7th pic. Hit the affected area with some fine emery cloth, cleaned, greased and reassembled. Now works nice and smooth in both directions. One more thing off the list. Cheers, Mike

IMG_20200405_103216097.jpg IMG_20200405_103510169.jpg IMG_20200405_104904696.jpg IMG_20200405_114339780.jpg

IMG_20200405_114347284.jpg IMG_20200405_114654101.jpg IMG_20200405_121850778.jpg IMG_20200405_114339780.jpg IMG_20200405_123444198.jpg IMG_20200405_125515772.jpg
 

hman

Active User
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Messages
2,758
In the shop, I finally got round to mounting my York vise / Power arm combo that I restored and had been sitting on my bench for god knows how long.
That's a fantastic looking restoration! I've never seen that nice a vise on a swivel (power) arm before. Panavise is nowhere near as good.
 

GreatOldOne

R'lyeh Engineering Works
H-M Supporter Gold Member
Joined
Mar 20, 2014
Messages
314
Nice idea to have the thrust bearing on the QCTP

EDIT: Noticed it about $7 on eBay for a needle thrust bearing like that with 2 washers!
yeah, they’re not expensive, and it makes tightening the post & getting more clamping pressure easier.

That's a fantastic looking restoration! I've never seen that nice a vise on a swivel (power) arm before. Panavise is nowhere near as good.
Thanks! Its only been sat on my workbench waiting to be mounted for 2 YEARS! :oops::D
 
Last edited:
It can take up to an hour for ads to appear on the page. See our code implementation guide for more details. If you already have Auto ad code on your pages there's no need to replace it with this code
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock