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Power requirement for RF30/31

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Investigator

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#1
I'm getting very close to finishing the rebuild/repaint of my new-to-me mill/drill. I'm about to install the new spindle bearings and finish the assembly. I have moved the machine from the rebuild location at my fathers, into my shop at home. I hope in the next few days to power it up.

My question is about the power. As it sits now, it is wired for 110V. It would be very easy for me to run a 220v line to the location. If I power it with 220v, I need to rewire the switch. If I keep in at 110v, I need to know if a 20amp circuit is enough.

My initial thought is to leave it as it is now and just use it on 110V. But since I don't have a manual for this machine, I have been reading the Grizzly manual for the g3358, the Shop Fox manual for the 1007, and the Grizzly manual for the g1006. Of the 3, only the manual for the G1006 calls for a 20 amp 110V circuit. The other 2 call for a 30 amp 110V circuit.

All 3 manuals spec a 2hp motor which is what mine has.

For what it is worth, the machine I have has the standard household 110v plug on it. A 110V 30 amp plug is different. By this logic a 20amp circuit should be fine.

Opinions? Suggestions?
 

Dave Paine

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#2
I would run a 220Vcircuit and rewire or replace the switch if it does not break both 220V conductors. I prefer the lower amp draw on 220V.

What is the nameplate amps. Some manufacturers round up fractional HP ratings to the next whole number, so 1 1/2HP may be rated as2 HP. The amps are normally correct.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#3
the 110v 20 amp circuit would be sufficient to operate the mill.
you'll only pull around 15 amps unless you are really trying to stall the mill.
you'll almost never see a 30 amp 110v circuit unless you are in an industrial area
 

yendor

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#4
I have a Jet-15 which is one of the RF Family RF-30 if I'm not mistaken.

The Motor on mine is clearly marked for both 110V and 230V.
16/8 - (16 Amp for 110v and 8 Amp for 230V)
 

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I have a Jet-15 which is one of the RF Family RF-30 if I'm not mistaken.

The Motor on mine is clearly marked for both 110V and 230V.
16/8 - (16 Amp for 110v and 8 Amp for 230V)
Love to see a pic of your machine.
 

mikey

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#6
I'm attaching the RF-31 manual. Per our discussions, there probably isn't a lot of difference between that and the RF-30. Hope it helps.
 

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Ulma Doctor

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i found the motor specs funny in the manual, it said 1-1/2 - 2hp on the RF-31 like they don't really know what the actual HP
 

mikey

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i found the motor specs funny in the manual, it said 1-1/2 - 2hp on the RF-31 like they don't really know what the actual HP
Mike, you know as well as I do that on an Asian machine, 1-1/2hp is equal to 2hp, and 2 Asian horses is equal to 1 American horse. :)
 

Ulma Doctor

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Mike, you know as well as I do that on an Asian machine, 1-1/2hp is equal to 2hp, and 2 Asian horses is equal to 1 American horse. :)
yes, sir i believe i have seen that stat before.
i just can't believe that there is no truth in the motor specifications.
i guess i'm just funny like that
 

Investigator

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Mike, you know as well as I do that on an Asian machine, 1-1/2hp is equal to 2hp, and 2 Asian horses is equal to 1 American horse. :)

Based on this, does this mean the specs for capabilities of the machine are off as well? If they over rate the motor, have they over rated the drilling or face milling capacities also?
 

mikey

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I was joking. I have no idea what the motor is really rated at. Most Chinese motor ratings are higher than they really are, whereas most American motors tend to be under-rated.
 

Investigator

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#12
Sorry Mikey, hard to read sarcasm on line sometimes.
And the ultimate reality is that no matter what it's still not a Bridgeport. Having said that, I bet I will still be happy with it as long as i remember to use it within it's limitations.
 

mikey

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#13
You're absolutely correct. The round column on our mills is a PITA but it is not a big deal if you plan your work. Aside from that, it is a basic milling machine that is much heavier and beefier than many of the benchtop milling machines you see. I actually like mine and since replacing the bearings, I find it more than accurate enough for my needs.
 

yendor

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#14
I'll post up some pic's for you of my machine in about (2) weeks or so.
I'm right on the back end of finally finishing my basement shop after almost 18 months of no organized place to work.
Right now everything is moved to one side and covered in drop cloths.

The Framing is Done, Rough Electrical is in & Inspected, Sheetrock is up and in the process of being painted.
But... I've got an all week Sales Meeting next week, then a quick trip to Watertown, NY for my sons promotion to Captain, then a Week in Hawaii.
I'm not thinking I'll be making much progress in the next (2) weeks
 
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