Quarantine Projects!

Weldo

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Thanks Weldo. My problem is I'm not set up to cut the pockets as precise as they should be. I was so involved with the other aspects of the project that I just thought I'd figure that out when I got to it. But I'm stunned how deep the wabbit hole of insert nomenclature etc is and how crucial the pocket is to proper function. I'm already set up to grind and profile HSS so I think I'll stick with what I know for now. I'm thinking the same 1/4" HSS setup I use on the shaper will work fine and if not I'll make something else.
That's cool. Inserts are a language all their own.

Weldo, I’m not sure about more durable but it cures in and hour vs days.
I did buy a dishwasher from Craigslist one time for $25 to use as a parts washer for a Willys Jeep transmission and transfer case. I put caster wheels on it. I never got to use it. By the time I was ready I had to back to working out of town.
Creative solutions! It would be a huge time saver to wash a bunch of parts at once. It was mentioned before about dishwasher detergent being very alkaline but maybe you could just use Dawn liquid instead?
 

Weldo

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Here's a pick of the copper thing I mentioned above. It's what I use for cutting lubrication.

The old lathe manual I have says that lard oil is a great cutting oil so I figured I'd make a thing to hold some lard, except it's usually solid at room temp so I needed a way to heat it to melting.

EM520536.JPG

I made most of it out of 1/4" copper tube and some sheet copper. It holds a standard tea light and the pipe on the side hold a small brush. For tapping and drilling I most often just dip the tap or drill in the grease and go to work. The heat of friction melts the lard and it works quite well as a cutting fluid.

EM520537.JPG

The bowl was pounded out from a piece of copper flashing. It was my first attempt at such metal shaping but it went well. I had to anneal several times. After working the metal a while it starts to become harder to move but after heating red hot and cooling it moves almost as easy as lead!

EM520538.JPG

I did some experiments with the annealing process by heating and air cooling and heating and quenching in water. It seemed to make no difference. Usually with steel you must cool slowly to anneal but with copper you can quench it.

EM520542.JPG

It was a fun project!
 

Weldo

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Got my belt sander back together!

First was to install the switch. I got this thing from ebay. It's from BOAT #6 apparantly.

EM520545.JPG

Mounted in the box. I made this enclosure from scratch a few years ago.

EM520546.JPG

Got all the wiring back in. I had to switch rotation of the motor. The motor plate tells you to switch the black and red wires on the inside.

EM520548.JPG

Mounted the sander to the plate. I got this part from ebay as well from an industrial reseller. I got a deal because the guard was bent in shipping. It was easily fixed in a few minutes but after living with it for a few weeks I canned it anyway. I like to sharpen tungstens on the top wheel.

EM520550.JPG

All reinstalled. Does anyone know if it matters how the link type belts are oriented? There's no arrows on it and I can't remember how it was.

EM520553.JPG

Here it is back home next to the drill press. I have the table reinstalled here as well. You can see the top wheel which was covered by the original guard. It makes a good spot to grind tungstens.

EM520554.JPG

It runs pretty well. The rpm of the motor and the motor pulley are the same as the old motor so SFM is the same. However it does have more power. I used to be able to easily stall out the grinder but now it takes much more effort to bog it down. All in all, a win!

On to the next thing!
 

DavidR8

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Here's a pick of the copper thing I mentioned above. It's what I use for cutting lubrication.

The old lathe manual I have says that lard oil is a great cutting oil so I figured I'd make a thing to hold some lard, except it's usually solid at room temp so I needed a way to heat it to melting.
By lard, do you mean Crisco? As in flaky pie crust lard?
 

brino

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Really it would be nice to have a dedicated oven for the shop.

Along those lines I wonder if an old dishwasher could be converted to recirculate parts washing fluid! Maybe disable the heater element and plug up the drain. It would need a filter I guess, or maybe not. Imagine putting a bunch of greasy parts in there, pushing a button and coming back in 45 minutes to nice clean parts!
It's more likely that I could fit a milling machine in the kitchen than an oven or dishwasher in my cramped shop.
But then you guys would all get all my tools for pennies per pound just after my funeral.....
-brino
 

MrWhoopee

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By lard, do you mean Crisco? As in flaky pie crust lard?
Ah, you kids!

1585074789014.png

Lard oil is the clear, colourless oil pressed from pure lard after it has been crystallized, or grained, at 7° C (45° F). It is used as a lubricant, in cutting oils, and in soap manufacture. The solid residue, lard stearin, is used in shortenings…
 

Weldo

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Lard oil is the clear, colourless oil pressed from pure lard after it has been crystallized, or grained, at 7° C (45° F). It is used as a lubricant, in cutting oils, and in soap manufacture. The solid residue, lard stearin, is used in shortenings…
Hey thanks for clearing that up! I've actually never found a good explanation of what lard oil even is. As for me, I am indeed using bacon drippings. Actually I think my latest batch was from the New Years pork roast. I filtered it through some paper towels. I was kind of worried about the salt content but now I don't think it's a problem, in fact it may be why my cutting lard never seems to go rancid...

"The tails follow" is the recommendation for link belt rotation.
In that case I think I did it right. The links kind of look like arrows I guess and they point WITH direction of rotation.

The fun of sheltering in place is about to begin. AR15 barrels R Us. The junior shooters will have plenty to burn in the next couple of years.
What all you gotta do to 'em? Chamber? Profile outside? They look pretty chunky for AR barrels!
 

Weldo

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Lard oil is the clear, colourless oil pressed from pure lard after it has been crystallized, or grained, at 7° C (45° F). It is used as a lubricant, in cutting oils, and in soap manufacture. The solid residue, lard stearin, is used in shortenings…
If I wanted to make lard oil could I just buy the tubba lard you pictured and press the crap out of it? Would that yield me purified lard oil?

I've only ever found one place on the net that sells it, here but now I can't find it on their site.
 

Bamban

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What all you gotta do to 'em? Chamber? Profile outside? They look pretty chunky for AR barrels!
They are 1.005 straight so I can chamber them through the Jet 1024 headstock which has a limited spindle bore of 1-1/16.

Chamber, cut to finish at 20 for service rifle, turn the front end for the .750 gas block, drill/ream gas port, thread muzzle for flash hider, crown.

The 12.xxx inch long section inside the handguard will remain at 1.005.

These barrels will be used in service rifle high power competitions, at distances 200, 300 and 600. The adventurous ones, with the same 80 grain ammo, might try their hands at 1000.
 
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Weldo

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Cool! And this is for a school team?
 

Skierdude

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I'm working on my mill DRO project.
Have the x and y axis done. Need to mount the display and put the table back on.
#MeToo - DRO install I mean. Got the display mounted - the easy part. Working on the Y axis next - the trickiest part.

We’re in lock down for 4 weeks here in New Zealand so hoping to get a few projects completed. I just hope I have the right materials available.

Keep safe everyone.

David P
 

DavidR8

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#MeToo - DRO install I mean. Got the display mounted - the easy part. Working on the Y axis next - the trickiest part.

We’re in lock down for 4 weeks here in New Zealand so hoping to get a few projects completed. I just hope I have the right materials available.

Keep safe everyone.

David P
Be great to see pics as you proceed. :)
 

MrWhoopee

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If I wanted to make lard oil could I just buy the tubba lard you pictured and press the crap out of it? Would that yield me purified lard oil?
You would have to try it. I'm not clear on whether the commercial lard is before or after pressing.
The stuff is cheap enough.
Let us know.
 

Rootpass

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This quarantine will be responsible for more DROs being installed than anything else. I finally mounted my Z axis using scrap aluminum pieces. The taper on the side of the mill is 2 degrees so I made an angle to put it the vise. BB6AE34C-7409-4221-BDBA-683A1A04A705.jpeg 2ECDEC58-CB07-4F94-88D5-97BD916589EE.jpeg A6DAF083-BACC-4487-AA44-139E6D8493DF.jpeg
 

Weldo

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Got some more work done!

Made a bunch of rags out of an old bath towel. We all know the home shop runs on good rags! I had to throw out my previous collection of rags. They were all so filthy that the stuff I attempted to clean got even dirtier!

EM520555.JPG

The cutting up of the towel led to the next thing, rehabbing the scissors! These were my grandma's scissors she used exclusively for fabric and sewing work. They must be at least 60 years old and in need of some attention. Although even in this state they work very well.

EM520556.JPG

Some rust had accumulated.

EM520557.JPG

Here they are after half an hour of wire wheeling, sandpapering and scotchbrite.

EM520561.JPG

EM520562.JPG

They work so beautifully! Even the sound of them is pleasant! They'll cleanly cut a piece of toilet paper all the way to the tip of the blade. Sweet!
*Disclaimer* One square of toilet paper was sacrificed for testing...

Also I organized my grinding wheels. They used to just sit on the top shelf in a pile but look at 'em now!

EM520563.JPG

Tomorrow I may finally balance my bench grinder. I picked up the Oneway kit a few months ago.
 

Weldo

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I see. I saw junior and my mind went to "high school".

When chambering a barrel there's a lot to consider isn't there? How deep the chamber goes can affect how accurate the gun will shoot and could even make it unsafe.

I seem to remember reading something about the tiny bit of free space in between the projectile and the rifling of the barrel. Like if the bullet has to travel too far before it contacts the rifling, then accuracy can be affected negatively. Gunsmith machining is definitely a whole nother world. Lots of intricacies.
 

matthewsx

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Got some more work done!

Made a bunch of rags out of an old bath towel. We all know the home shop runs on good rags! I had to throw out my previous collection of rags. They were all so filthy that the stuff I attempted to clean got even dirtier!

View attachment 318039

The cutting up of the towel led to the next thing, rehabbing the scissors! These were my grandma's scissors she used exclusively for fabric and sewing work. They must be at least 60 years old and in need of some attention. Although even in this state they work very well.

View attachment 318040

Some rust had accumulated.

View attachment 318041

Here they are after half an hour of wire wheeling, sandpapering and scotchbrite.

View attachment 318042

View attachment 318043

They work so beautifully! Even the sound of them is pleasant! They'll cleanly cut a piece of toilet paper all the way to the tip of the blade. Sweet!
*Disclaimer* One square of toilet paper was sacrificed for testing...

Also I organized my grinding wheels. They used to just sit on the top shelf in a pile but look at 'em now!

View attachment 318044

Tomorrow I may finally balance my bench grinder. I picked up the Oneway kit a few months ago.
I love the basic stuff: Rags, grandma's scissors:applause 2:
 

mmcmdl

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For a 61 YO dude , I did a lot today . Finished the pit . cut two lawns , started parting out the Cub , put down 50 lbs of grass seed , inquired about a back hoe for the bota , put some tiles in the upstairs bathroom , have all my cans ready to go the scrapper ( which is closed do to crono ) . Tomorrow I break out the chain saws and load the pit once again , Sun night was the first trial run which went great . Once Im assurd the chain saws are up to snuff , I'll get bck on the shop stuff .
 

mmcmdl

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Once again I lose 3/4 s of the pictures . I will find them cuz their going onto CL . :grin:
 

mmcmdl

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Tonight , I will be counting the change jar . I hope to come out with 3-4 Gs . I've scoped out a 28 ft trailer that would solve my problems short hand .
 

Bamban

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I see. I saw junior and my mind went to "high school".

When chambering a barrel there's a lot to consider isn't there? How deep the chamber goes can affect how accurate the gun will shoot and could even make it unsafe.

I seem to remember reading something about the tiny bit of free space in between the projectile and the rifling of the barrel. Like if the bullet has to travel too far before it contacts the rifling, then accuracy can be affected negatively. Gunsmith machining is definitely a whole nother world. Lots of intricacies.
Not any more intricate than other machining. It still boils down to Machining 101 - cutting to a dimension while maintaining set up and workholding integrity.
 
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westerner

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But then you guys would all get all my tools for pennies per pound just after my funeral.....
It seems every idea I come up with for a Q project ends up with the above as the final step....
 

westerner

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And I do not mean to say THE BUG is what will get me:cautious::grin:
 
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