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Quill Adjustment Screw

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K\Harnish

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#1
My Craftsman Drill Press (113.213150 - Made in Taiwan) has a lot of play in the quill, especially at at the full end of the travel. This play is greater along the X axis (in mill terms) than along the Y axis. (More side to side than front to back.)

Yesterday, I finally got around to taking the whole thing apart. All the bearings seem fine with no noticeable play.

I don't understand the quill adjustment screw - just in front of the return spring. It has 2 flats, and rides in a groove in the quill. However it can only turn about 10 degrees before it jams into the sides of the slot. If this is to limit front to back movement, it seem the groove in the quill should be much deeper to give a bigger bite on the walls of the groove. If it is to control side to side movement, it seems I should be able to turn it more than 10 degrees.

My solution, so far, is to cut a new screw with the end turned down to a snug fit in the groove. I made it out of brass so I won't be damaging the quill. This should allow much better adjustment for side to side play, but will not give me any front to back adjustment.

My search on YouTube found videos for adjusting Delta and Ryobi DP and both of them mentioned that the flats were on the same axis as the slot of the screw. That makes me think I am missing something if all 3 brands (or at least 2 brands - who knows who made the Craftsman) are using the same design.
 

Bob Korves

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#2
With the close fitting quill to head and a snug fitting adjustment screw there should be very little play in the quill, though it can wear pretty quickly into being looser . Regardless, adjusting out the play at only one point is mostly a "feel good" adjustment. My Taiwan made Enco drill press (1986) has the same setup, as do many or most others. Drill presses in general are not high precision machines...
 

RJSakowski

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#3
I have the same adjustment on my Taiwan made drill press, ca 1980. I believe its purpose is to act as a drag so when you release the crank, it doesn't slam back.

edit: I went down and took a look at mine. The manual just says "quill set screw" so no help there. My screw only rotates less than a quarter turn and seems to limit the rotational travel of the quill. This could be due to the a swaging of the point in 35 years of use though. If I tighten it, it does increase the drag on the quill return and it also reduces the rotational free play of the quill.

Unfortunately, I can't back mine out to look at the point (probably another indication of a swaged tip).
 
Last edited:

dlane

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#4
The screw is just to keep the quill in line with the pinion gear , most don't have adjustment for sloppy quills . I picked up this DP that has adjustable quill , the front of the casting is split with three screws to tighten up the quill bore it is an older central machinery Dp , haven't seen meny like it , but I like it.
image.jpeg
image.jpeg

Not sure how one might tighten up the quill bore on other DPs without the split
I did have to put a good Chuck on it and made some new handle ends
Sorry first pic is goofy
 

mikey

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#5
If your Craftsman drill press was made in Taiwan, it was probably made by Rexon.

That screw should not bind; it should be adjustable all the way in, even with flats. The purpose of the screw is to remove lateral play in the quill and you adjust it by advancing it until the quill binds, then back it off until the quill just runs free before locking down the jam nut.

If the flats on the screw prevent the screw from turning then you have at least three options: Turn the flats round, turn a new screw with a round tip or make a square or round nosed insert and back it with the adjuster. Nothing says the nose of the screw has to have flats. My RF-31 mill/drill has the same arrangement and the nose of the screw is rounded. If I recall, the screw on my Craftsman drill press (made by Rexon) is also round.

Hope that helps.

Mike
 

K\Harnish

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#6
If your Craftsman drill press was made in Taiwan, it was probably made by Rexon.

That screw should not bind; it should be adjustable all the way in, even with flats. The purpose of the screw is to remove lateral play in the quill and you adjust it by advancing it until the quill binds, then back it off until the quill just runs free before locking down the jam nut.

If the flats on the screw prevent the screw from turning then you have at least three options: Turn the flats round, turn a new screw with a round tip or make a square or round nosed insert and back it with the adjuster. Nothing says the nose of the screw has to have flats. My RF-31 mill/drill has the same arrangement and the nose of the screw is rounded. If I recall, the screw on my Craftsman drill press (made by Rexon) is also round.

Hope that helps.

Mike
This is what I have, and my solution:
IMG_1599.JPG

IMG_1598.JPG

IMG_1600.JPG

RJS, I suspect you cannot back your screw out because the diameter of the screw is wider than the slot. That is what is confusing me - why was it made this way?
(On my 3rd photo you can see where I galled the groove a bit trying to adjust the old screw.)

Since the only way I know to insert the old screw is with the quill out (put in the screw, put in the quill, check adjustment, pull out the quill, adjust the screw…) I decided to hold off re-assembly until I got a few replies to my question. Now I will finish the rest of the clean-up, check for any more responses, then re-assemble.

I'll keep you posted.

K
 

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