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Radius Turning Tool...

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dlane

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#31
“am seriously going to try to make my own tooling, particularly in a way to get more rigidity for a radius turner. There has to be a better way... I want to be able to put balls on steel sometime.”
Not to hijack the thread but if you can make one of these ball turners , just sayin, it is Shop made by a real good machinist, “ not me” can get about a 1” ball out of it if set up correctly.
D0D471FF-BC7D-44CB-A6E2-3686E90593E2.jpeg 67B1E886-547C-43E9-9C57-949FFBBDE159.jpeg D2D65254-AA2D-4540-894A-02EC55D73F10.jpeg
Came from a tooling garage sale , think I paid $10. For it
First pic is the bottom , second is the top ,third is the guts
 

Ken from ontario

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#32
Dlane,I haven't tried that type of radius turner but it does look more rigid than the one King and I are using but I know one thing, if the radius turner I'm using was build bigger and more solidly (like the one Mr pete uses in his video) I'm sure it'll do the job just as well, the difference is ,it is a simpler design , I always like simple and functional tools.
 

DAT510

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#34
I made a ball turner using a boring head, which is mounted in to a Boring Bar QCTP holder. It allows me to have both a Boring Head and Ball Turner in one.

Much like this one:
 

The_Apprentice

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#35
Not to hijack-
Don't be silly. I am here to learn and master radius-turning, etc... I like seeing input on my threads.

Much like this one:
I remember coming across one of this man's videos before on youtube. Was interesting to see that even old-timers still make use of their old 4WTP and not EVERYTHING revolves around quick-changers all the time. :p
 

The_Apprentice

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#36
After doing some thought recently, instead of doing changes to the radius turner, or changing to a different one, I'm thinking my next big thing for the compound I'd like to try is a milling attachement... to turn my lathe into a poor-man's mill. But I don't know, for the price of one single attachment, it almost starts to make sense just to buy a separate mill altogether. Hmmmm!

Busy Bee:
https://www.busybeetools.com/products/milling-attachment-for-lathe-cx704.html

$300, and that's supposedly a discounted value? I just don't know, LOL. Too bad I didn't have my own milling machine, then I could make my own milling attachment!

As for my polishing experiment, I have experimented lately on ignoring sandpapering and just using green Scotchbright, then adding Mother's to it at the end. Seems to work decent, but I am not 100% sure yet about skipping the sandpapering. Will continue doing experiments on this...
 

Ken from ontario

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#37
turn my lathe into a poor-man's mill. But I don't know, for the price of one single attachment, it almost starts to make sense just to buy a separate mill altogether. Hmmmm!
The price difference is huge thou. there's an ad on kijiji(not too far from you) for a round column mill for $1200, it's possible to negotiate the price for under $1000, now that's a decent mill, 220v ,2 hp motor.heavy mill.:

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-view-details.html?adId=1334037004&requestSource=b
 

The_Apprentice

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#38
Hmm, looks like it's gone now. But to have a larger mill like that here, I would have to somehow get it through very narrow doors into my house, and down an old fashioned extremely steep set of stairs, with very little maneuver room, and I would have to get new wiring done to support 240v. Etc...

A lot of more problems for me unfortunately.

For the moment though, I am about to begin a new project. I stopped by Metal SuperMarkets yesterday to pick up a 1.5"x5" roundbar (hot rolled) and some 1/8 steel rod 24".

I want to try to make a decent mandrel for making jump-rings next. Large jump rings that you can't seem to buy. After me and my girlfriend looked around, we decided to just make our own using a self-made mandrel.

Well, this will be my first turning test on my lathe to see if I can cut into real steel for once and not just cheap aluminum. I"m a bit worried here how things will go... I also have carbide tips for my mini-lathe which I know is not suggested for steel on these non-industrial type machines.

IMG_7609.JPG
 

Ken from ontario

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#39
Well, this will be my first turning test on my lathe to see if I can cut into real steel for once and not just cheap aluminum. I"m a bit worried here how things will go... I also have carbide tips for my mini-lathe which I know is not suggested for steel on these non-industrial type machines.
The last few times I turned steel I used my mister instead of cutting oil and the carbide tip seems to cut with less effort, of course I played with speed /feed and depth of cut until I got the right combination, I wouldn't worry too much about cutting steel,I'm sure you'll be alright with your mini lathe.
 

The_Apprentice

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#40
I think that's what I forgot.. oil for cutting. Now I am wondering, (this may be stupid), but can I use normal engine oil they sell cheap, or does that come with too low of a flash-point? I have looked around, and got so much disputed information on that. Oddly enough, I hear Canola oil is actually used a lot. Only problem is it goes rancid and attracts ants. LOL!

Princess Auto sells Cutting Oil specifically for mini-lathes, etc. But at $35 a bottle, that just seems... a little off. Anyhow, I remember watching my father always have a brush in a coffeecup of oil which he wiped on parts when turning. I'll try filling my cup with canola maybe after my next WalMart trip. :p

As for my trip earlier today, I picked up a few items! Yes, it's just a cheap carbon tap & die set, but I'm new to this and will mostly be doing tests on aluminum for a while... Besides, Harbor Freight had a 20% coupon to use today. But I'm such a newbie, I opened it up-side down, spilling it all out the first time. :p

And, also in the pic is my 100mm ER collect chuck... But I'll be putting my 3-jaw on for a while first. Partly because the collet didn't come with mounting bolts I need to buy still. Grrrr.



die.JPG
 

Bob Korves

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#41
We use lubricating oil to help keep metals from galling when rotating while forced together. We use cutting oil to facilitate removing metal from metal parts when rubbing while forced together. Yes, it all feels like oil when you rub it between thumb and index finger, but it is most certainly not interchangeable.
 

Ken from ontario

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#42
But I'm such a newbie, I opened it up-side down, spilling it all out the first time. :p
:excitement::excitement::excitement:

If there's a NAPA, or Fastenal or even home Depot near you, then I would suggest you get a small bottle of cutting oil mainly because you are cutting steel and not Aluminum.
WD-40 ,,Kerosene, would be alright with Aluminum but with steel we need all the help we can get,right?
And, also in the pic is my 100mm ER collect chuck... But I'll be putting my 3-jaw on for a while first. Partly because the collet didn't come with mounting bolts I need to buy still. Grrrr.
I use the mounting bolts from my 3 jaw chuck,all they are ,is just 1.1/8" M10 or M12 threaded rods with nuts, by the way, your HF shopping cart looks decent, I like the ER chuck the best.:)
 

The_Apprentice

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#43
I must be getting old, I never paid attention to NAPA or Fastenal and never knew they existed, probably because my father never went there that i remember growing up. But checking out, yes we have them here locally.

NAPA sells cutting oil for much less than Home Depot, that is for sure. Definitely should avoid Home Depot at all costs. LOL

I will try to pick up a 500ml bottle from Napa today and see how it goes. If it doesn't last long, I'll grab the 4L pack from Princess Auto in the future.

I'll probably stick to just using the method of using a paint-brush to apply, though it seems some people prefer the spray-bottle on their lathe? Seems to me that would result in spraying oil droplets all over the place where it is not always intended.

In the meantime, two days ago I took apart my steady-rest and greased it up, as it was hard to move the elements to adjust. Working on my mandrel will be the first time I'm using one of these, hope it TURNS out well (no pun intended).
 

The_Apprentice

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#44
Ok now! What a day... Went today to pick up some cutting oil. And man, did it cause a lot of smoke. (At least I assume it's the oil and not the metal that caused it). Made me think about the days of black gunpowder and being in the middle of a division of musket line-infantry right after a full round of volley-fire. LOL

I started turning the hot-rolled steel today. It was actually a SUCCESS! Kind of got my self confidence up a bit with this thing... also did some new things, working with a steady-rest, etc. At the end of the day I tried to do a bit of polishing of the metal, tried using sandpaper of different grits but...it seemed to help somewhat but still not really quite where I wanted. No big deal, it's just a mandrel I'm building here, nothing fancy. I still am curious how to get a good polish though on steel (assuming it is even possible). I will do some research on it, as I think Mothers is only for Aluminum :)

Ohh, and now I need to drill some holes into the bar, which is going to be hard. Especially with no drill press or mill. Well, I have some ideas for getting a hole into the side of round-bar...

Maybe I can lay the bar into a vice or centering jig, and manually start with a very fine drillbit first after using a center punch... or...

I can try to mount the bar into a jig onto a faceplate on the lathe, and then use the tailstock.... possibly to drill. I don't know... will have to experiment some more..

All in all, today was a good learning experience.

IMG_7612.JPG
IMG_7618.JPG
 

The_Apprentice

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#45
Even though I got my center-punches, haven't touched the mandrel in days. Instead I tried another random experiment. Playing with some aluminum pipe and trying to make it look like a million bucks. Ahah!

First time I got to use my jaws to clamp on an item from the inside. Unfortunately I can not get a good grip for getting things on center. Now I know why they have those large pipe-type centers to go into the tailstock. I will probably look soon to pick one up for my mini.

I thought I could use my radius tool to round the end of pipe like this (for a rounded bevel)... found out that it is IMPOSSIBLE, just a limitation due to how the tool is made, you can't get in with it, without redesigning the tool. Oh well, I was able to cut a groove into the side of the pipe, but that's all you can do with the radius tool on a piece like this.

Ended up just using carbide to cut a chamfer on the edges of the pipe. But even that is wobbly, because I need to find a way to get pipe perfectly on center. I'm not too worried about it, just another project I'll work on tweaking... and more tools to buy!

pipe.jpg
 

The_Apprentice

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#46
Today we are back on track with the radius tool again. I did some further testing... and cringed while getting ready to cut into 304 stainless steel. I wasn't too sure the tool would be up to the task, but I am happy with the results.

What I was not happy with is there seemed to be quite some play between the handle and the cutting tool. After I took this picture, I took the radius tool apart, and found out the problem was between the hinge-bolt connected to the handle, and the inner yoke. There was a tiny set screw down there I re-tightened, and also cleaned out a bunch of shavings inside between the set-screw and a drilled hole for it to catch into. It feels much more rigid now so I will do some further tests tonight and see if the improvements help.

Some things I don't like is how the inner and outer yoke are kind of rough cut with odd etch lines. I'm not sure how they originally cut this, but it does make things rub and jam quite a bit when I tighten the rest of the frame. Added some chain-lube but I think down the road I will see if I can grind part of the frame somehow and make it more smooth and less catchy.

In the meantime, I'm trying to figure out solutions to get a mirror polish on this 304... I will have to find a good way to smooth out those mini cut-lines first somehow... I'm sure scotchbrite isn't going to be the same solution it was with aluminum.
ss.jpg
 

Ken from ontario

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#47
When I work with it I lift the handle up before the start of the radius and keep holding it that way until I get to the end ,I'm thinking it gives a more consistent cut .
 
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