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Recomended pinters?

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COMachinist

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#1
I been thinking about getting a 3 d printer been looking on Amazon and Ebay. I think I would like one that will use all the filaments, nylon seems be a strong long lasting filament. I plan to do some items for my air guns and things for SWMBW. LOL. I saw this one on Ebay “HICTOP Prusa I3 Cr-10s DIY 3d Printer With Filament Monitor Upgrade Dual Z-axis” it looks like a nice printer. I have been looking for a while, but I think I’m ready to do it. Looks like ithere to stay.
Any in put would be welcome, I have Fusion 360 hobby, and getting better at using it. Seams cheeper to proto type things than starting with a cnc mill.

Thanks
CH
 

Dave Paine

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#2
I have a CR10S. Your link is not working for me not sure what difference a HICTOP version may be. Likely not much difference.

I purchased the CR10S over the CR10 for the following features :
a) Dual Z axis lead screws. In this design two stepper motors. Some other printers have two lead screws with single stepper motor and a belt to connect the two screws.
b) Filament sensor. If the filament runs out the print will be paused. You can then resume when new filament has been fed through the monitor and extruder. I used this feature when I wanted to change filament during a print. Cut the old spool, let the sensor detect no filament, then switched spools and resumed the print.
c) Resume after power failure. Last week we had a power blip during high winds. I was over 1 hr into a 3 hr print. When I got to the printer it was asking if I wanted to resume. I clicked "Yes".

The feature works as expected. FYI when the printer stops there will be some small amount of filament which will ooze out of the nozzle due to pressure in the extruder. This may be seen in the print depending if the pause was while printing infill or external surface. I was printing a slotted box for desiccant and got this small blob on one of the ribs. Not a big deal for this print.

Slotted_box_slight_blob_from_power_failure_8806.jpg


I am happy with my CR10S and can recommend this printer to others.

Just be aware that 3D printing has a big learning curve. The slicing software which converts STL files to GCODE files is critical. I have tried several. Some work better than others for me. I am still learning on how to tweak the settings with a given slicing software application.

Some of my first attempts at printing were these handwheel upgrades for the CR10 bed height adjustment.

Top left was no name brand blue tape. Fused so well to the print it will not come off. I switched to 3M Painters blue tape. Normally come off easily, but some slicing software manages to make even the 3M fuse to the print.

The stringing was due to my not knowing how to set what is called "Retraction" correctly. This reverses the filament in the extruder on layer changes to avoid the oozing and stringing. Part of the learning curve.

Handwheel_evolution_bottom_view_8578.jpg


Another learning curve is the filament. This spool of clear PLA sometimes gives a good print, then sometimes a failed print.

I printed this file for a knob and it worked. I changed size slightly in the slicing software, then the next print failed. I knew it was the filament.

Jig_knob_failed_print_top_view_8821.jpg


I changed to another manufacturer of PLA and the same file printed fine, as expected.

Jig_knobs_Hatchbox_filament_better_results.jpg


I still struggle to be able to get good bridging, which is the term for printing horizontal sections without support.

This is about the best I have achieved, but still some sagging.

Bridging_test_15_still_some_sagging_8731.jpg


I am not trying to put you off, just advising some of the learning curve issues. When things work it is a LOT of fun.
 

COMachinist

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#3
Thanks, it sounds like a good starter printer. I know from research there is learning curve. I took a class over at the local Librery that has 3d printers. It is 20 miles over there that is why I want to get my own.
Again Thanks
CH
 

Hawkeye

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#4
It took me a while to get my i3 working and there are still a few things to get working better, but it's great to suddenly remember "oh. I can make that out of plastic." Between 3D printing and the X2 CNC mill, there are a lot of possibilities. The manual machines still get lots of use, though.

I finally got a successful print for a lost-PLA casting of an aluminum cover for the oil filter on my Aspencade. Top and bottom are 2 layers thick, perimeters are only 1 layer thick, 5% infill. It's amazingly strong, but should melt out quite well.
 
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