Refinishing paint on my B&S Model 2 Grinder

mike58

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I picked up an old Brown&Sharpe manual surface grinder in good working order. The original touched-up paint on the machine is flaking off in large pieces. I want to get it looking better, not to the level of an OEM restoration but better than just painting over the chipped & missing paint. I've done auto body work & painting. Will a thorough DA sanding with a medium grit disc to blend the chipped areas with the casting then a couple of heavy primer coats work? Would a chemical stripper down to the cast iron then prime & sand & prime a few times be better. Suggestions on how you guys have restored your machines would help. B&S repaint-1.jpg B&S repaint-2.jpg B&S repaint-3.jpg
 

benmychree

John York
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Best is to save all the finish and filler that is still adhering, fill low spots with bondo and for minor divots use lacquer putty, thoroughly sand old repaint down to original finish, prime, and finish with an automotive finish.
 

mike58

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Best is to save all the finish and filler that is still adhering, fill low spots with bondo and for minor divots use lacquer putty, thoroughly sand old repaint down to original finish, prime, and finish with an automotive finish.
Thanks for the advice John makes good sense. I'll follow up with some pics as I work thru it. Mike
 

pontiac428

John Newman
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Be mindful of sanding that leaded paint. You're better off with the chemical stripper. At least that way the dust won't find its way into the recesses of your shop. Yes, this is a Prop. 65 warning.
 

Bob Korves

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Tim9

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Haven’t read all of Bob’s links....but I purchased a gallon of oil based Rustoleum Grey from Loews. It just about perfectly matches my Clausing Grey finish on my 50 y/o 5903 lathe. I used same gallon to paint my Millrite. I’m more than happy with Rustoleum paint for shop tools. Being an oil based paint....no worries about oil inside of cast iron porous castings.
Just clean it good....wipe it down with mineral spirits and then sprayed it with cheap HF HVLP touch up gravity feed gun. Simple thinning with mineral spirits for easy spraying. FWIW...never use that low volatility green mineral spirits. It’ll mess stuff up.
As a side note....I’ve mentioned this in other forums and some responses go on to mention that Rustoleum won’t hold up as good as two part urathane paints. Duuhbhhh. Of course it won’t. But it’s not going to cost 300.00 either nor will you need to totally remove any traces of oil in the cast iron castings. And FWIW, it’s about impossible to get oil out of cast iron unless you burn it out in a fire.

For 30.00 a gallon, it’s hard to beat Rustoleum oil paints for quick easy paint jobs. Of course it’s not going to be as durable as DuPont Irmon. But we’re talking about a damned machine tool. My machines are now presentable and oil / dirt just wipes off. Great stuff for what it is. It’s not a show car. Not a display for a man cave. It’s a damned lathe and a milling machine. And it’s fast and easy.

and....that Rustoleum Grey looks about the same color as your grinder.
 
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