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Reloading press rebuild question

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Liljoebrshooter

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#1
I am going to rebuild another press and would like to have input on my setup.
I have done one of these before and wondered if there is a better and maybe a more accurate way to do this.
I turned the adaptor for the thread and then using that for mounting the press on the lathe.
I then turn the bottom so I can use the steady rest to hold it. Then using a boring bar to open the bore to accept a bushing.
I then take the press out of the lathe and press the bushings in, put it back in the lathe and bore the bushings to the correct size.
Is there anything I can do to make sure the holes on the top and bottom are straight?
Thanks for any help.
Joe Hynes 20181203_181315.jpg 20180103_182819.jpg 20180104_175529.jpg
 

Liljoebrshooter

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#2
A few more pics 20180103_190058.jpg 20180104_170759.jpg 20180105_155858.jpg
 

Liljoebrshooter

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#5
After using the boring bar to get the hole very close to finish size, I used a small hone to get the final size to keep clearance very tight.
This is a press that is converted into a bullet making press. So the ram is slightly different.
Is there a different way to skin this cat?

Thanks
Joe Hynes
 

benmychree

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#6
If that is a steel bushing with a steel ram (unhardened) sliding in it with a close fit, galling can be expected; the bushing should be bronze or cast iron, but a hard shaft would also help if using steel as a bushing material, and finish quality is also an important issue. The only way to get it (truly) concentric, so far as I can see is to line bore it, with a threaded bushing to guide the boring bar on the top end.
 

Liljoebrshooter

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#7
The bushing is a high load bushing from McMaster. I bought a couple to try them out. The other press I did, i used a bronze bushing.
The shaft is 1144 TGP, it is very consistent diameter wise and straight.
Here is a picture of the other press I did.
20171219_185055.jpg
 

derf

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#8
Are you actually making bullets, or just re-pointing them?
 

Liljoebrshooter

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#9
Making jacketed bullets for benchrest shooting.
20180115_191537.jpg 20171128_181431.jpg 20171201_191457.jpg 20171209_183051.jpg
 

pontiac428

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#10
What cal and grn wt. are you making? What's the cost per 100 doing it that way? Obviously in BR you're checking everything, so I assume they fly well. Is there a competitive edge in forming your own, beyond what you can get from normal weight sorting? Do you think the efforts diminish the returns at this point (like meplat uniforming)?
 

ThinWoodsman

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#11
Kinda curious about the cost benefits myself. I do a lot of hand-loading, and after amoritizing brass over 5 uses the bullet is by far the most expensive part. Been thinking of casting my own, but hadn't considered jacketing.
 

Tozguy

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#12
For score shooting, 30 BR is the favorite calibre but it is difficult to find good bullets for the twist rates involved (15 to 17:1 twist are common). So several top shooters have taken to making their own out of necessity. This situation may be changing but for now hand made bullets rule in score shooting. It is a lot of work, attention to detail and investment in equipment and raw materials so I doubt that there is an economic reason to do it.
 

Liljoebrshooter

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#13
There is absolutely no cost savings making your own bullets. I am trying to make a good bullet for competition.
Yes, you can buy good bullets, but they are never the same.
The dies are the expensive part, I just bought a used set that was close to $2000.
20181115_160945.jpg
I can make a 6mm bullet from about 63 gr to 68gr.
There is very little sorting and I don't know of anyone that tips or does any work on the meplat in short range benchrest.
 

pontiac428

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#14
Ah, of course. Short range 30 BR is a perfect example- where to find 110 gr .30 projos? My most sought after projectile is the Berger 6mm 135 gr, which is easy to find. Next is the 175 gr .30, also easy to find. I try to contain my delusions of wildcatting to commonly available source components, so even a funky build may not push me in that direction. Hmmm. I'd love to be convinced on the usefulness, so please continue sharing the enlightenment! (For point of reference, I shoot highpower, prone, and F-class. Not classes won by marginal gains like BR. Does punching a single hole in the paper for short range bench ever get boring?) :cool:
 

derf

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#15
I was just wondering how that press works.....I saw it was a Lee. All of the Lee presses I have seen has a toggle stop on the linkage which prevents the ram from going all the way to top dead center and full dwell.
 
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