[4]

Restored JD Wallace wood jointer

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

Johnwright

Wannabe machinist
Registered
Joined
Aug 19, 2014
Messages
76
Likes
26
#1
I was visiting with a friend in his shop, just sitting around B/Sing and he told me about an old wood jointer he had been given many years earlier. Naturally, loving old equipment I asked if I could look at it and he finally found it on a shelf in a lean-to shed attached to his shop. It was a heavy, rusted clump of cast iron and I could barely make out what it was, but of course I began hauling it out into the daylight. Some of the parts had been taken off, I'm presuming in order for someone else to inspect it for damage. The cutterhead had at some time gotten loose and suffered some damage to the bearing shells. We decided that the patent date of 1917 was enough to give up on it being of any value since the cast iron shells and the steel cutter head would need to be replaced. Regardless, he asked if I wanted it and never being one to pass up free equipment, we loaded it up in my truck & away I went. A few days later, I disassembled the heavy thing just to see if everything else was undamaged. It would need a cutterhead assembly and nothing else, if that is I could get enough rust off it. I used electrolysis to get some of it cleaned up enough to use a wire brush on it, but the larger castings were too large for my small 5 gallon bucket I use for most rusty parts. I mixed up some mollasses mix and it sat for several weeks working it's magic. I finally found someone who sells old equipment (djfshop) I believe in Minnesota, that had exactly what I needed. For less than $50 in a few days I had the parts in hand and after close inspection I began looking for new bearings. In a town about 45 miles away, I found a bearing supplier (Motion Industries) that could get the specialized bearings and I had them in a few days. I began the final cleanup, I assembled everything, tested it out and painted it a machine gray color. It works flawlessly and was well worth all the aggravation, but I thrive on the satisfaction of getting old iron running again. I am using it often in some wood working that I also enjoy. Thanks for perusing my longwinded post, and enjoy the pics. image.jpeg image.jpeg image.png image.jpeg
 

mikey

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Dec 20, 2012
Messages
4,480
Likes
4,845
#2
Neat story and nice save there! It turned out really nice, Johnwright.

I have an old Boice Crane jointer that I saved in much the same way and plan to convert it from belt to direct drive, too.
 

benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
2,568
Likes
1,886
#3
I too like to see old machinery saved, and have done so a number of times; indeed, it does look nice.
I have a Oliver 6" jointer that is quite similar to it.
 

ELHEAD

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Feb 13, 2014
Messages
255
Likes
194
#4
Great job I have had that same joiner for about 45 yrs . Does yours have the original drive coupling, with the two plates with dowels and punched leather washer. Mine finally gave up the ghost 10 yrs or so ago. Replaced it with a Lovejoy. Thinking my Wallace wad antiquated I tried a Craftsman for a while. Went back to the Wallace. And haven't looked back. The Wallace with less than half the HP did a better job. Mime is still unrestored. Will take pic and post next time on the shop.
 

middle.road

Actively Learning...
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 28, 2014
Messages
1,535
Likes
828
#5
That Sir, is bloody gorgeous!
Fantastic job.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top