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Restoring An Old 1992 Standard Modern 1034

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Srbowles

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#1
Hello Folks! I am interested in restoring, or attempting to restore an old Standard Modern. I have some photos here of one in an auction. Does anyone know if this is too far gone or is it worth a try to bid on something like this? If so, what would be a good offering bid? Thanks for your opinion!

Steve
 

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dlane

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#2
Shame it’s setting outside getting rusty ,if you search buying a lathe should give you an idea of what to lookout for.
 

BtoVin83

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#3
I'll throw my 2 cents in, not an expert in this. It looks like it has been cannibalized to fix other lathes. If you can't make the missing parts you might have more just in parts then the lathe is worth. Plus why was this one designated to donate parts rather than be repaired? A lot of people claim it"s just surface rust but in my opinion the rust pits the surface and creates a nice surface to sand sown the soft part, the saddle and the tail stock. So the lifespan will seriously shortened unless reground or scraped ways. If they gave it to you and paid for delivery it might be salvaged, too bad I hate to see machinery treated that way.
 

dlane

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#4
I’m not seeing anything missing except the Danger sign is missing on the first two pics, the surface rust should clean up good if not deeply pitted , biggest thing to check is bedway ware, if cheep enough could be worth it if ways are good
 

Dabbler

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#5
I think SM lathes are great iron. I'd give a 10X34 a place in my shop almost any time. Be very careful with this purchase. You shouldn't bid too much as it will require TONS of work.

Everything will have to be dissassembled, and they ways will take many hours of careful stoning to get right. In my opinion, it has been left too long in the rain. That rust looks deep. Having the bed reground (a valid option) will cost you just south of $2000. Modern tool here does that and they recently gave that figure for a 12X36 Taiwanese lathe.

To be honest if you wait, a decent used lathe should come up that is better cared for under 2K$.
 

4GSR

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#6
The lathe in the first picture would be the only one out of all them worth salvaging. The others have broken handwheels, missing parts to the compound, etc. For me to rebuild, any of them, they are rebuildable, but to a novice, no.
 

dlane

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#7
Didn’t notice they were different lathes , (op ,have pics of one at auction).
:beer bottles:
 

markba633csi

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#8
One of our members AJB bought one of those a few years ago and fixed it up pretty nice, check out "crying shame" in the auction site listing section to see pictures- I think he paid about 1800$
Mark S.
ps I think these are actually 1334s not 1034s
 
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dennys502

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#9
With the amount of rust on the ways that they have - personally to me they are scrap metal or parts.
 

jwmay

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#10
I take exception to something from 1992 being called “old”. My first lathe was from 1946. It’d have to be prehistoric by this standard.

The answer to your question is more about your personal interest, ability,available time, available disposable income, and purpose in owning a machine tool. Btw, my 1946 lathe got disassembled and sold in pieces after I figured out my own answers to this very same question. Then I bought a 3 year old barely used machine and have been quite happy.

Disclaimer: I’m very very new around here and to machining in general.
 

projectnut

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#11
the
I take exception to something from 1992 being called “old”. My first lathe was from 1946. It’d have to be prehistoric by this standard.

The answer to your question is more about your personal interest, ability,available time, available disposable income, and purpose in owning a machine tool. Btw, my 1946 lathe got disassembled and sold in pieces after I figured out my own answers to this very same question. Then I bought a 3 year old barely used machine and have been quite happy.

Disclaimer: I’m very very new around here and to machining in general.
I think in this case "old" is a relative term. Given that these machines are for sale by Government Liquidators means they were more than likely from a military installation. The military (at least in the past) believed that very few pieces of equipment should be retained beyond half their expected service life. This was to insure that in the case of a national emergency all equipment would be capable of performing for extended time periods at full operating capacity. This philosophy may have changed in recent years given budget problems, but it was the standard for decades.

Many government entities operate on budget that includes replacement of capital equipment and perishable tooling on a scheduled basis. When a piece of equipment has reached the age where it is deemed cost effective to replace it, the machine is replaced regardless of its condition. It's another of those Catch 22 situations. If you don't spend the money in the year it's budgeted for it won't transfer to the next budget cycle. The money is "lost", and the next annual operating budget is reduced by that amount. So now the money is no longer available the piece of equipment may or may not last until the next budget cycle. Rather than take a chance that the machinery will make it to the next budget cycle the common practice is to CYA and replace it as scheduled, period. In many cases machines are left unprotected outside to further justify that they are indeed in poor condition and warrant replacement.

Most commercial operations would not consider machines of this age "old". They would be in the prime of their productive life, and expected to produce for another 15 years or longer. Frankly these machines are newer than all the machinery in my shop. The oldest machines in my shop date to the early 1900's. Several others are from the late 1930's to the late 1940's. With the newest machines ranging from the 1960's to the late 1980's.
 
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AJB

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#12
As someone mentioned above, I took a chance on one of those lathes a few years ago and I am well satisfied with the machine. Check the "Crying Shame" post where I go into some details on the one I bought. I considered the purchase to be a gamble, but I figured that if the lathe was a bust, I could recoup half my money on selling the accessories.

The gamble paid off for me and I now have a North American made, fully functional, fully equipped, and very tight machine at less than 2/3rds the cost of a new Chinese import (which is what I likely would have bought if the SM hadn't worked out).
 

Srbowles

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#13
Shame it’s setting outside getting rusty ,if you search buying a lathe should give you an idea of what to lookout for.
projectnut: Thank you for the suggestion. I’ve been trying to gather information on the different metal lathes and this forum is great!
 

Srbowles

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#14
I'll throw my 2 cents in, not an expert in this. It looks like it has been cannibalized to fix other lathes. If you can't make the missing parts you might have more just in parts then the lathe is worth. Plus why was this one designated to donate parts rather than be repaired? A lot of people claim it"s just surface rust but in my opinion the rust pits the surface and creates a nice surface to sand sown the soft part, the saddle and the tail stock. So the lifespan will seriously shortened unless reground or scraped ways. If they gave it to you and paid for delivery it might be salvaged, too bad I hate to see machinery treated that way.
This is actually a gov’t auction where there are 9 of these Standard Moderns up for sale. Right now, the the are ranging from $45 - $410. The bidding is over on Monday. Thank you for your 2 cents!
 

markba633csi

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#15
If I could get one of those for 500 bucks I wouldn't care about the rust much LOL
Notice also that most of them have the carriage parked near the headstock so at least that area of the ways should be decent
Mark
 

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#16
If you can get one in the $500 range, and have a lot of time (and like using elbow grease) a SM lathe will last you a good many years. I am concerned about the rust, yes, but at that price it is worth a gamble. [Especially if it includes at least one chuck] :encourage:
 

pdentrem

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#19
Funny, how must people would rather buy old American iron instead of the cheap imports and a lot of the comments in this topic were “don’t buy it”. ;)
 

projectnut

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#20
Funny, how must people would rather buy old American iron instead of the cheap imports and a lot of the comments in this topic were “don’t buy it”. ;)
Those who prefer Old American Iron" usually have the chance to inspect the machine and actually see it run. With this style auction there is virtually no way to see it run, or anyone there that knows anything about the history of the machines. It's essentially "a pig in a poke". There is the possibility you can get a good machine, but an even greater possibility that you'll get a piece of junk. Some are willing to take the chance if the price is right. If you do end up with a great machine more power to you, if you don't it could cost more to refurbish it (if it even can be refurbished) than it would cost to buy new.
 

Ken from ontario

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#21
There is the possibility you can get a good machine, but an even greater possibility that you'll get a piece of junk.
That's the scary part, I really wanted a bigger lathe than the mini lathe I have but the possibility of getting a piece of junk was greater than I anticipated .
I still will entertain the idea of buying an older model lathe if I could buy a second one as a part donner ,this way at least I have some hope I can get one good lathe out of the two.
 
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Dabbler

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#22
Ken, there is a problem with that idea. almost every lathe you get will be worn in the same areas, broken at the same weak point, etc. If you aren't afraid of the work, and can use a 3m pad to rub the rust (to be sure it isn't too pitted), I'd bid a low-ball on the best of the lot. If you lose, no biggie - if you win, you have a project.

about the ways: if you rub the tail stock end, and near where the chuck would end, the both should come up bright with small, .5mm pits in them. That way is recoverable with a lot of elbow grease. Bigger pits or not coming up bright, walk away, and don't even bid. An experienced rebuilder could make a great lathe out of a bad one, but only for a pastime. it isn't worth the work if the ways are badly pitted.

- oh, for the want of a tarp! :cry::cower::frown 2:
 

PaulWestSki

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#23
Hello Folks! I am interested in restoring, or attempting to restore an old Standard Modern. I have some photos here of one in an auction. Does anyone know if this is too far gone or is it worth a try to bid on something like this? If so, what would be a good offering bid? Thanks for your opinion!

Steve
Did you bid on one?
 

Srbowles

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#24
Yes, I did. I was placing bids up to $430, then backed out. I think after I learn more about lathes and actually working with one for a while I may go back and bid in another one of the gov’t auctions. As I remember some of the final bids were up to $500 - $600 on the Standand Moderns. The site doesn’t really allow you to go back and see what they sold for. I guess that’s not too bad if you know what you are getting into. I did not. This forum, from my initial post, convinced me to think about what I want to do right now - either spin some metal or try and figure out how to restore one of these old dogs. After additional research and reading in this forum I’m thinking seriously about the Precision Matthews PM-1228VF-LB.
 

Dabbler

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#25
The Standard Modern machines after the 1970s changes are very well built machines, and as long as they haven't been severely abused they can be a great value!
 
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