Restoring an old powered hacksaw

kb58

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To the OP, I had to laugh when your neighbor offered it for "free."

This is the same sort of neighbor who offers seeds to his neighbors, saying "I just can't seem to get these to grow", figuring correctly that pride will take over, the neighbors will grow them, ending up with too many to eat, and end up giving him some "in payment."

In your case, your generous neighbor ends up with someone who has a fully functioning saw, so he'll probably be showing up eventually with this or that to cut, so that you can "show off" the saw to him. Pretty clever on his part... and he doesn't have a big, barely-working saw cluttering up his shop :)
 

evan-e-cent

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IMG_2327-Hacksaw before restoration-WEB.jpg

I mentioned to an engineering friend that I was going to the "Men's Shed" to use their electric hacksaw. He said he has one that he never uses because he orders all his stock cut to length. Is he gave it to me. The thick layer of dirt was testament to the fact that it had not been used for decades. I didn't take a photo until after cleaning the thickest layers of dirt. I tried to buy some orange epoxy paint but could not get anywhere near the right colour. So I used the Epoxy Ultra-Blue that I had used to paint my Boxford lathe and drill stand. So now they all match.

IMG_2327-Hacksaw before restoration-WEB.jpg Hacksaw cutting 80mm stainless steel-WEB.jpg.jpg

Here it is cutting the 80mm diameter stainless steel bar that I used to make the ball turning attachment that I posted today. Apparently in South Africa they call this a "Strongarm".

Cast into the arm is "HAWKINS CH-CH". The abbreviation CH-CH is for Christchurch in New Zealand. I did some research and found that Hawkins Foundry in Christchurch was advertising this kind of equipment from 1932 to 1946. He was the maker of postage franking machines and NZ was one of the first countries in the world to use the system starting in 1905.

In the last photo, at the bottom you can see a white pill box. It contains a microswitch. the bar through the middle is spring loaded to push up. There is a larger sleeve on the shaft that turns the switch off then the blade gets to the bottom.

Originally this had some kind of lifter mechanism to raise the blade on the backstroke. It would have been hydraulic, but it is missing and I have not yet made a replacement. It also needs a guard on the belt and moving parts.

Auto-cutoff-switch-WEB.jpg
 

evan-e-cent

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I am new to Hobby-Machinist. I posted a long reply with photos of a hacksaw I restored, but there is no sign of my post after 24h. I wonder why??
 
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