Shop Made Diamond Tool Sharpener

brav65

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Thanks for commenting Brooks!
I wish we were neighbors too, we'd sure have a lot of fun and PO the neighbors for sure!!!
Hopefully my threads give the impression of being there, i guess it's the next best thing!

My relationship with windex is strictly platonic....:)

It's a very inexpensive cutting agent.
I learned of it's value from Richard King's scraping class,
we used windex on our work when we were stoning the surface between scraping cycles.
you'd simply brush off the chips and give a couple squirts of windex, stone the area and wipe dry.
then another blue up on the surface plate for the next cycle.
it's cheap and effective.
Care should be taken to dry off the remnants after use, it may rust iron bearing pieces

I have used dollar store window cleaner for cleaning the bores and chambers of my war relic rifles after shooting corrosive primers.
the windex/water ratio in the cheap window cleaner neutralizes the corrosion left behind when the shell goes bang.
after the treatment of a patch with the cheap stuff, i'll run it down the bore until it comes back 90% clean
i'd then clean the rifle as normal and re-oil for storage.
corrosive ammo will literally eat your firearms if given half a chance!

thanks for reading!!!

Thanks for clarifying Mike. You know your in trouble if you start using windex as a medical treatment
 

Uglydog

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Have you found this 600 grit diamond wheel to work well.

I have also wished I had a Glendo for sharpening scrapers, and perhaps salvaging lathe cutters.

Does this RPM work well?

I haven't put enough thought or research, so I guess this is the beginning of the project.

I've got several scraping projects lined up for the summer.

Any idea what was used before diamond wheels? Carbide goes back farther than diamond wheels, doesn't it?

Thanks,
Daryl
MN


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Ulma Doctor

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Hi Daryl- thanks for reading ,

the 600 grit works very well indeed.:D
the RPM may be a tad slower than the accu finish or glendo, i don't feel that it will be much of a hinderance.
it leaves a very nice edge on the carbide i have sharpened so far,
i don't think i'd change very much if i was to do it again.

I didn't put a lot of thought into the project,i basically had a few beers and built it in my head while i was at a party.
i made a couple changes to the original idea on the fly and came up with what we got here today!

i have a bunch of projects as well, it's going to be fun!!!

I can't say for certain what they used for sharpening carbide in the old days,
i'm thinking that they probably used the green grinder wheels before diamond wheels, but it's only a guess.
the subject is certainly worthy of research .

all the best
mike
 

Uglydog

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I had the privilege of spending the day with Richard King. I neglected to ask about the history of sharpening carbide. However, I did ask about speed and grit. Historically, he used a 250 (roughing) and a 600. Both at 300-350rpm. Recently he stumbled on some 1200. He remains convinced that all are appropriate depending on the objectives. He uses a glendo and swaps out the diamond wheel as needed.

Fortunately, I've got a solid set up that meets those rpm needs specs. OK it weighs 200 pounds but it's already here! I'll need to create an tiltable table and fashion a method to attach the diamond wheels.

It's terrible to be relegated to long days in the hobby shop trying to figure out a problem!


Daryl
MN
 

Ulma Doctor

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Sounds like you have the power plant and diamond wheels.
the platform might be able to be constricted with some 1/4 plate and some angle iron.
i'm sure you'll come up with a masterpiece of your own!
keep us informed, i'd sure like to see it!
 

randyc

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Feb 5, 2015
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...i don't think i'd change very much if i was to do it again...

Since you wouldn't change it much if you had it to do over, then I'd say that it has met it's design goals !

Recalling our earlier discussion about wheel speed, while watching your video an advantage of slower speed occurred to me. With very slow RPM, out of balance conditions aren't important because the wheel and associated rotating parts never approach critical speed.

(Critical speed, for those unfamiliar with the term, is when a rotating object reaches a specific RPM that causes the center of gravity to shift toward the center or rotation - the effect is somewhat like a vibration resonance. Hours could be spent balancing a wheel statically but once it approaches critical speed, it's a whole new situation, usually a bad one !)

Thanks for all of the detailed information. Using Windex is an interesting idea - intuitively I'd not embrace it but if Rich King likes it then so do I, LOL :)
 

Ulma Doctor

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I initially didn't like the idea of windex, but after using it for a couple years,
i am becoming a little like the father in my big fat greek wedding as Brooks(brav65) pointed out earlier! :eagerness:
it really works!

thanks for reading, and the input of information as well.
i hope the information may help others to take a stab at creation!
 

hman

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Feb 17, 2013
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Here's my version of this type of grinder. I started with the motor from a ceiling fan that a neighbor was throwing away. It's a single speed motor that runs at about 200 RPM. Most ceiling fans are multi-speed, and one of them might have been better - but this one was free.
kHPIM4226.jpg
Turned a hub of Delrin. Added a Harbor Freight #37081 "funnel tray" and a sleeve around the hub. Used "Go2" glue to seal around the sleeve and washers, so I could some day add flood coolant.
kHPIM4227.jpg
Very fortunately, the diamond wheel that comes with Harbor Freight #98862 and the 240 grit diamond wheel I got from Amazon
http://www.amazon.com/uxcell-100x32...766198&sr=8-8&keywords=diamond+grinding+wheel
both have the same 20mm center hole (as does the 600 grit wheel that Ulma Doctor found on eBay - THANKS, UD). Note the outer sleeve on the hub - cut from a vitamin pill bottle. It and the inner sleeve attached to the tray should keep coolant (and grit/swarf) out of the motor.
kHPIM4232.jpg
The allen wrench goes into a 5/32" hole in the hub, ala "tommy bar", to keep the shaft from rotating when I (hand) tighten the 1/2-20 bolt.
kHPIM4229.jpg kHPIM4230.jpg
 
Last edited:

Rick Leslie

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Jul 30, 2012
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Very timely that I stumble on this thread. A while back a good friend gifted me two cup wheels. I made an arbor for the mill and use one for a poor substitute for a surface grinder. The other is slated for tool grinding. Now, I just need to make some time and shamelessly copy these ideas. Thanks for the info and photos.
 
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