Show us your Logan lathes!

wa5cab

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There are shall we say six general types of spanners, Face, Hook or Pin, and each can usually be found as either Fixed or Adjustable. You need a Hook Spanner (probably made by either Armstong or Williams) to fit the diameter of the coupling nut that retains the chuck. It can be either fixed or adjustable. The coupling or retaining nut stays on the spindle, has RH threads, and is turned CW (looking from the tailstock end of the lathe) to loosen. You should have no problem finding one on eBay, once you measure the diameter of the nut.
 
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mrbreezeet1

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It looks like it uses a hook wrench, which are sized by the diameter of the part you're tightening. I bet that's
a standard part and shouldn't be hard to find. I bet if you posted a question on the General Home Shop sub-forum
asking what wrench a long-taper spindle chuck uses, you'll get a definite answer.

https://www.smalltools.com/lathe-spindle-nose-identification-chart/

Here's a vid that should help:
Interesting.
I like how he tightened it, then hit it a few times whim a hammer to seat it, then tightened a little more.

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Headrc

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I found one on Ebay ....$30 and it works so I am good now on this one. Thanks folks.
 

Hoyt

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I just acquired a Logan 400, S/N 52434 which puts it as manufactured in 1949. It seems to have spent the past several decades in a woodworking shop (lots of oily sawdust) and the man who owned the lathe (I bought it from an estate) obtained it from a fellow US Naval officer. It came with a 4-jaw chuck and the collet chuck and several tailstock Jacobs chucks. The headstock cover was missing and had been replaced with a homemade fiberglass cover, functional but ugly, and I sourced a replacement. This is the lathe as I received it. I'm in the process of dis-assembling the headstock to replace the back gear and replace the V-belt. I'll just clean it up and not re-paint it.
001-EUZl5ZI.jpg
 

Nogoingback

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What shape are the headstock bearings in?

Welcome to the forum, and congrats on the new lathe.
 

millsrv

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Both of these Power Kraft (Logan) Lathes I acquired within the last year from Craigslist (from two different sellers). Coincidently both lathes are 1953. The one pictured without the quick change gear box has seen little use and has it's original paperwork including factory inspection card dated 9/11/1953. The lathes wound up costing me $500 each and came with 3 and 4 jaw chucks, backing plates, assorted tooling, and one Dumore tool post grinder. I realize that two lathes may be a bit much but the price was right, I have the room, and use them both. The pictured Palmgren Milling Attachment is a more recent purchase along with a QCTP. I machined the T bolt for the QCTP using the milling attachment. Both lathes appear to have the original belts and they work fine especially considering they are 65 years old!

IMG_4397.JPG IMG_4667.JPG IMG_4669.JPG IMG_4670.JPG
 

Nogoingback

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Great deal for 2 lathes and all they came with!
 

millsrv

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I forgot to mention that I added the stands, they did not come with them. The lathe pictured with the quick change gear box I built the stand for the other I modified, someone else made it years ago for a wood lathe.
 

mrbreezeet1

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Both of these Power Kraft (Logan) Lathes I acquired within the last year from Craigslist (from two different sellers). Coincidently both lathes are 1953. The one pictured without the quick change gear box has seen little use and has it's original paperwork including factory inspection card dated 9/11/1953. The lathes wound up costing me $500 each and came with 3 and 4 jaw chucks, backing plates, assorted tooling, and one Dumore tool post grinder. I realize that two lathes may be a bit much but the price was right, I have the room, and use them both. The pictured Palmgren Milling Attachment is a more recent purchase along with a QCTP. I machined the T bolt for the QCTP using the milling attachment. Both lathes appear to have the original belts and they work fine especially considering they are 65 years old!

View attachment 278259 View attachment 278260 View attachment 278261 View attachment 278262
I like that bench with the tool carts under it.

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Hoyt

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What shape are the headstock bearings in?
They appear to be in fine shape, but after 70 years, I'll clean them and re-pack the bearings. From what I've read, I'll need a special bearing grease (?) and put the bearings and grease in a plastic bag and pull a vacuum on it to force the grease into them.
 

Nogoingback

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On my Model 200, the stock bearing had a seal on one side only, so it might work to put in the bag and simply work it in by hand. My understanding is that overgreasing should be avoided and that 1/3 of the volume should be greased, but hopefully the resident bearing experts around here (and there are some) will weigh in on that subject.
 

Hoyt

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It appears that Chevron SRI-2 is the bearing grease to use. I ordered it from Amazon for $12.85.
https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01FL5BYGC/
The suggestion (from Scott Logan, IIRC) to soak the bearings in Pine Sol, rinse with hot water and repeat until the water runs clean worked as promised.

Repacking the bearings using using a kitchen vacuum food-saver worked well. I found it easiest to do one bearing at a time, coating the edges heavily with grease and placing the bag under vacuum. The only problem I ran into was knowing just how much grease was in the bearing since the recommendation is to fill it only 1/3 to 1/2 full. I probably got too much grease in each one, but . . .
 

rambin

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I've heard of a trick done back in the day where you put grease in a metal pail, throw in your bearings, and put the bucket over a fire. The hot grease thins out and soaks into the bearings and when it cools the grease thickens and they're greased. Never tried it but it does makes sense. Just a thought. Vacuum bag sounds easier but never tried either
 

Richard White (richardsrelics)

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View attachment 211393
This is the only picture of my 820 I have right now. The history I know of it is that it was originally owned by Essex Wire in Fort Wayne. My brother's friend's granddad acquired it, and parked it in a shed for untold years. It was given to my brother, who later said I could have it. It was dusty, dirty, and full of crap. So far I've cleaned, oiled, bought a new chuck, new single phase 120v motor (I no longer have the three phase motor and now need the step pulley) and a drill chuck for the tailstock. I've been at the computer for several days drawing a taper attachment that I probably won't make anytime soon. Looking at these restored lathes makes me want to strip it down and repaint it.
Message me or come visit me,would LOVE to help you get this up and running again.. I am in Kendallville
 

Leal N

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I thought I would post my two: The '62 1825 was done last year. The '51 955 was just finished up!

289869 289870
The 955 was a fun project. I reluctantly (too many projects) purchased it from a debris hauler. He said it was heading for the scrape yard. Given its terrible appearance, I thought I could get some parts for the 1825. Being a turret lathe, the ways cleaned up nice and were in great shape, so I wasn't going to part it out. Hence, the clean up and putting my South Bend 10L on hold. It has the original Peerless 1/2 1PH motor with a Lovejoy variable pulley. I have never seen quite the setup this one has. The variable brass speed handle has an LA- designation. It also has a brake and tailstock with a beefy quill and point indicator towards the handle (with is graduated). It was a basket case...but fun!
 
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A618fan2

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I thought I would post my two: The '62 1825 was done last year. The '51 955 was just finished up!

View attachment 289869 View attachment 289870
The 955 was a fun project. I reluctantly (too many projects) purchased it from a debris hauler. He said it was heading for the scrape yard. Given its terrible appearance, I thought I could get some parts for the 1825. Being a turret lathe, the ways cleaned up nice and were in great shape, so I wasn't going to part it out. Hence, the clean up and putting my South Bend 10L on hold. It has the original Peerless 1/2 1PH motor with a Lovejoy variable pulley. I have never seen quite the setup this one has. The variable brass speed handle has an LA- designation. It also has a brake and tailstock with a beefy quill and point indicator towards the handle (with is graduated). It was a basket case...but fun!
You did great justice to those lathes - VERY nice work!

John
 

OldManPatterson

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I have two Logans at the moment, but for now, I'll just share the one at work. It's a 927 (which I don't see many of), serial number 56767. I got it from a state auction. Much of the lathe was in excellent shape, but the bull and back gears had been severely crashed, and needed repaired. I've sorted most of that out now, and I went through the whole machine, replacing bearings and repainting everything. I went for a "Fallout" paint theme, for anyone familiar with the game, and I'm pretty happy with it. IMG_20190511_203221_349.jpg
IMG_20190511_203221_350.jpg
 
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