Show Us Your Shop Made Tooling!

davidh

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Since I've been watching this thread, I decided to post a few of my own creations:

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nice work, handy stuff too. I need to show off my captured nut too :) just had to. . . . captured nut 002.jpg

captured nut 002.jpg
 

brasssmanget

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I made one of those thread rods with smooth ends last year, and everyone that sees it is totally confused and in awe of how it was done. Quite a conversation piece at my house.....
 

itsme_Bernie

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Re: Shop made tooling

Here's a simple one for ya' I made a depth gauge for my shop press using a pointer and a 6" scale mounted with magnets. Just gives me some idea of where I'm at and helps when using my brake to make more than one part at the same angle.
Wow! What a great idea! Love it! I could put one on top of the arbor press, with an attachment sort of like the tailstock dial indicator adapters...

Bernie
 

Chucketn

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I completed my drawbar wrench/hammer for my X2 mill today. I’m quite pleased with it. It’s not perfect, but I’m proud of it. It was made from a store bought deep socket, and brass and aluminum I inherited in Dad’s workbench. This project was based on and inspired by the Soft Faced Hammer Project on the Projects in Metal Forum.
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Chuck

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Charley Davidson

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Chuck, that hammer is very nice & resourceful, but wondering if the socket will hold up. Is it cast or machined from a solid piece?
 

Chucketn

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Charlie, I don't have a clue as to the construction of the socket. I bought it off the rack at Lowe's. Just a 17 mm deep socket, I think it was Kobalt brand. I don't think I'll wear it out!

Chuck
 

righto88

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Chuck thank you for posting this. I got to put that on my "to do" list. I have been wanting to make one and never tought of using a deep well sockett.
That will make it easy. Yours looks very nice.:man:And like you think I am sure that sockett will last quite a while. And if it did give up the ghost in 5, 10, 15,,,, years, it would be easy to repair.
 

Chucketn

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righto88,

If you don't need chrome on the socket, Im told the black impact sockets are easier to machine. I had a time trying to counterbore the socket for the handle.
I also tried to ad a washer of black plastic between the brass and aluminum in the handle for contrast, bit couldn't get a decent finish on it.

Chuck
 

Harvey Melvin Richards

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Digital Depth Gauge

I made a base for a digital indicator and turned it into a very useful digital depth gauge. The collet that holds the indicator is available from McMaster Carr, MCS, and Starrett. By using different indicator tips, it can be used on very small diameter holes. The base is tool steel that has been ground flat, but not hardened.


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melsdad

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Looks good. How have you used it so far?

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Harvey Melvin Richards

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Looks good. How have you used it so far?

Sent from my SCH-I535 using Tapatalk
I assume you are asking about my depth gauge. Yes, I use it regularly. I have a digital Mitutoyo, 0 to 6" and a vernier Starrett 0 to 6", and I use my modified indicator the most, especially on holes from 0 to 1". It's quick and just as accurate as the other gauges.
 

Jim1942

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I'm nowhere near the machinist that many of you guys are by any means of the word, but I have built a few pieces of machinery that have been a big help around the farm and my shop.

I saw a belt sander that takes a 3" X 120" belt and decided I would get a lot of use out of one. Well, actually I built 2 because I wanted 1 in my wood working shop and another down to my shed where I do some black smithing. I also wanted to build myself a power hammer.

I had an old set of 2 bottom plows sitting down in the woods and thought there was most of what I needed right there.

Attached are some pictures of the belt sanders and the power hammer. Also, is a picture of a hydraulic press that I built. I've had a lot of use out of it, especially when I needed to press a broach to cut an internal keyway. Not much precision, but good work horses on all 3 pieces.

Sorry, but I don't have very good lighting down to the shed. The power hammer and press don't show up good. Perhaps I'll do better later if there is any interest.

Jim

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melsdad

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I built a 2" x 72" belt grinder a few years ago. It is a KMG clone with a 2 hp 3ph motor run off a VFD. I still need to get everything powder coated and make a few more wheels, but she is running good!

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melsdad

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Here is a swiveling vise base that I made for apattot vise. I use this mainly for knife work, but it has been useful for other jobs over the years.
It swivels 360º and at an angle of 45º and locks down very snug with tightening any of the 3 s.h.c.s. in the base
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jbolt

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I thought the commercial rotary broach holders were priced way too high for what they are so I rolled my own. Body and tool holder from scrap 1018 crs, modified MT3/JT4 drill chuck arbor $8, ball and thrust bearings $30. I still need to make a straight arbor for using in the mill. Cutter in picture is 1/2" hex from Polygon. I plan on making my own as soon as I get my furnace built. So far I have used it to hex broach steel pinion gears.

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Jay

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xalky

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That's very cool. I've never seen a rotary broach in action. Is it a vibratory fore/aft motion that cuts the broach?
 

jbolt

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That's very cool. I've never seen a rotary broach in action. Is it a vibratory fore/aft motion that cuts the broach?
Here is a definition from Slater Tools. They have some videos too.


"Rotary broaching, also known as wobble broaching, is an exclusive, fast, amazing and accurate method of producing internal and external polygon forms on the end of a workpiece.
The Rotary Broach Tool Holder can be used on any CNC, Swiss, milling, screw or other turning machine. The Rotary Broach Tool Holder has an internal live spindle which holds an end cutting broach tool.
In a lathe, screw or other turning machine, the Rotary Broach Tool Holder is mounted stationary while its internal live spindle and rotary broach rotate with the workpiece. Driven by the workpiece, the rotary broach tool's corners are continually changing contact points on the workpiece, making a wobbling type action while it cuts each corner of the form. In a milling machine, the Tool Holder's body rotates with the machine spindle while its internal live spindle and the rotary broach tool remain stationary. This also creates a wobbling type action while the rotary broach tool's corners are continually changing contact points on the workpiece.
Form sizes can be broached up to 2 inches in aluminum, 1.5 inches in brass and 1 inch in steel. This is only a point of reference as many other materials and depths have been successfully rotary broached.
The recommended forming depth of rotary broaching is up to 1.5 times the distance across flats or the diameter of the inscribed circle profile to be broached. This again is only a point of reference. Depending on the application, deeper depths can be achieved."
 

xalky

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OK, so it's very similar to a rotary hammer drill in action. What I want to know is how is he producing the wobble?
 

GK1918

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Care to share how you did this one?

When you do, use locktite in there. Long ago we machined several even knurled the ends. Then left them at auto and hardware stores
on the counters.......used for advertising.........
 

McGuyvers shop

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I've had a little brass hammer for many years that someone made long ago. It is definitely used and I always think about who made it and what they were thinking when they made it. It's a good feeling to know that something you make will last for generations, so with that being said, I decided to make my own version of an aluminum / brass inserted hammer that hopefully someone 40 years from now will appreciate. Very basic, but I enjoyed it very much.

alum hammer.JPG
 

melsdad

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I thought the commercial rotary broach holders were priced way too high for what they are so I rolled my own. Body and tool holder from scrap 1018 crs, modified MT3/JT4 drill chuck arbor $8, ball and thrust bearings $30. I still need to make a straight arbor for using in the mill. Cutter in picture is 1/2" hex from Polygon. I plan on making my own as soon as I get my furnace built. So far I have used it to hex broach steel pinion gears.

View attachment 66105 View attachment 66106 View attachment 66107

Jay
Jbolt, That is a very clean and slick looking design! Can you elaborate on the tool with some sizes and maybe part numbers to the bearings?

How do you adjust the broaching tool to run concentric?

Thanks
 

rangerman

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OK, so it's very similar to a rotary hammer drill in action. What I want to know is how is he producing the wobble?
It produces a wobble because the longitudinal axis of the cutting tool is off by a degree or so compared to the axis of rotation of the work being cut.
When the work rotates ( or vice versa with the cutting tool) the cutting tool is carried with it but since the tool center line is not square with the work a rocking motion is produced whereby the cutting edges of the tool move in and out in a reciprocating motion against the work.
It's just like the tool edges are chiseling the work in a rapid succession.

I hope I have explained it simple enough.
 
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xalky

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It produces a wobble because the longitudinal axis of the cutting tool is off by a degree or so compared to the axis of rotation of the work being cut.
When the work rotates ( or vice versa with the cutting tool) the cutting tool is carried with it but since the tool center line is not square with the work a rocking motion is produced whereby the cutting edges of the tool move in and out in a reciprocating motion against the work.
It's just like the tool edges are chiseling the work in a rapid succession.

I hope I have explained it simple enough.
I know that now. I was so fascinated by it that I'm actually building one now. You can read about it here: http://www.hobby-machinist.com/showthread.php/19945-Shop-made-Rotary-broach-holder-and-broaches

Marcel
 

ARM

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I've had a little brass hammer for many years that someone made long ago. It is definitely used and I always think about who made it and what they were thinking when they made it. It's a good feeling to know that something you make will last for generations, so with that being said, I decided to make my own version of an aluminum / brass inserted hammer that hopefully someone 40 years from now will appreciate. Very basic, but I enjoyed it very much.
Hi McGuyver
Nice work
Not bad at all
Good show.
aRM
 

hman

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I completed my drawbar wrench/hammer for my X2 mill today. I’m quite pleased with it. It’s not perfect, but I’m proud of it. It was made from a store bought deep socket, and brass and aluminum I inherited in Dad’s workbench. This project was based on and inspired by the Soft Faced Hammer Project on the Projects in Metal Forum.

Chuck
That's definitely a beautiful piece of work, and your pride is justified. I've had my X2 for a number of years, and one of the first things I did was to dig through my "slush pile" of old wrenches to find one that fit the drawbar. I shortened it to about 6 1/2", just right to tighten the R8 collets sufficiently without going "farmer tight."

Very soon thereafter, I decided I needed to add some kind of soft-face hammer, to help release the collets. Being crude and lazy, I just found a random chunk of aluminum and milled it to fit (about 9/16 by 1 1/2 by 3/4"), sanded the curve to fit the wrench, and added a slot to accept a small hose clamp. It's been extremely handy, especially since I don't have to turn it to alternate between wrench mode to hammer mode.

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burtonbr

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I haven't made many tools or fixtures, myself. One of the reasons for joining this forum to learn more about machining and how to set up and make some of the tools and things I need. I've gotten many good ideas from many of you members here and my project list is probably longer already than I'll ever be able to complete with what I have. Thanks for that to everyone.
I was able to make a barrel vise for Thompson barrels and was very happy when it actually worked to remove 2 very stuck barrels from receiver nose sections without galling them, that I could not get out trying many other methods. its not too complicated but for one of my first machining projects I was pleased when it was successful.

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randyjaco

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I am not sure who I stole this from, but I really liked the idea. My big Clausing has a lot of torque and I have needed a quick vise for some of my drilling. So here is the evidence of my crime. :))

Randy

Quickvise 1.jpg Quickvise 2.jpg
 
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