• We want to encourage those of you who ENJOY our site and find it USEFUL to DONATE and UPGRADE your membership from active member to donating or premium membership. If you want to know the differences in membership benefits, please visit THIS PAGE:

    https://www.hobby-machinist.com/premium/

    Donating memberships start at just $10 per year. These memberships are in fact donations that help pay our costs, and keep our site running!
    Thank you for your donation, God Bless You
  • June Project of the Month (Click "x" at right to dismiss)
[4]

Show us your South Bend Lathe

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!
N

Nelson

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#1
We take great pride in our machines!

This is the thread to post photos of your beloved South Bend lathes, show "before" and "after photos and make our mouths water with the tooling and accessories you have accumulated for your machine.

A picture is worth a thousand words, but some captions would be awfully nice too!

So come on....let's see what you got!


Best,

Nelson
 
S

smithdoor

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#2
DSCN0091.jpg
South Bend 1949
9 x 42 24 CC
Rebuilt 2006
 

aametalmaster

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2010
Messages
610
Likes
168
#3
Here is my daily user my 1974 SB10K. Just happen to be winding mig wire in this pic.
And my 1941 "S" 10L. USN model sold to GE
And my 1919 15" x 6' From the Buckeye Automotive Company...Bob

1919 15 inch SBL 1.jpg wirewinding2.jpg 1941_10L.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

dcms

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Aug 21, 2011
Messages
22
Likes
0
#4
I enjoyed your restoration. Great job!

How do you remove the drawers to the metal cabinet on the 10k lathe you included in the post?

I have a similar lathe and want to remove the drawers in my lathe and repaint.

Don't see how the slides can be unlatched to remove the drawers??

Your suggestions are appreciated.
 

pjf134

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Jan 26, 2011
Messages
616
Likes
12
#6
1502_28_05_11_10_03_46.jpg

1502_13_06_11_10_15_40.jpg
Mine is a SB9A w/3 1/2' bed 1968 year, picked it up in Feb. and tore it apart to fix and paint, finished it up in May. I added a QCTP, live center and drill chuck and some tooling. I am going to make drawers for the table, got the wood, but did not do it yet. The lathe is a little messy now, but nowhere to put the stuff yet until I make some drawers. The first pic is the first day I got it, the second pic is when I was making something on it in June.
Paul
 
Last edited by a moderator:

furpo

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Nov 26, 2010
Messages
150
Likes
19
#7
Just received the Serial Card for my 16”/24” x 10’ South Bend 79833
Looks like it was born a 16” and the 24” added later.
It has only moved 60 miles in the last 75 years and I moved it 45 miles of the 75 mi.

Lathe.jpg Lathe1.jpg Lathe2.jpg
 
Last edited by a moderator:

terry_g

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Jan 21, 2011
Messages
82
Likes
13
#9
I found this lathe about 15 years ago. It came on a pallet with no tooling and a 3 jaw chuck missing a set of jaws.
It was in good condition otherwise.The bench and most of the tooling I built for it.
I replaced it with an Asian machine a couple years ago.
It was metric and could not cut an imperial thread.

Terry


3413278528_0ff61f2110_z.jpg
3413278234_e4d183c9dd_z.jpg
3412470921_b85678768b_z.jpg
3412471425_87c7307aa5_z.jpg
 

Attachments

geotek

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Sep 23, 2011
Messages
72
Likes
5
#10
Back in 1998 I ran into a great deal on a SB lathe. Below is part of the article I wrote about it.
............
A few weeks ago I asked my junk man if he ever picked-up any machinery, and if so bring it by. It may be worth more to me than the scrap yard. He started talking about some old computer printers and stuff he had found, but I explained that I was looking for machine shop stuff, you know, cast iron. He told me he had an old "metal cuttin machin", he didn't know what it was, just that it was 3-phase and nobody wanted it. I told him 3-phase was not a problem, and questioned him some more. He open his glove box and handed me a bent up piece of brass. I looked at the plate and at the top center it said (in bold letters) "South Bend Lathe Works". I told him I was indeed interested. The machine was in a pile of old chain link fence and posts only about two blocks away. It was still on a very large oak pallet, and held down with some large steel straps. I couldn't see it very well, the plastic tarp was disintegrating, but I could see that there was indeed a lathe under all of that. I offer him $250 for the mess, and he gladly accepted the offer. I went to get my engine hoist back from a friend while he and his helper loaded the lathe on his truck with the help of a large front end loader. We got the lathe over to my storage warehouse and unloaded it with the help of the engine hoist. Only then was I able to really get a look at my find. The lathe was a South Bend Heavy 10. It had a Springfield Armory property tag. I'm sure the pallet was the one the government had mounted it to when it was surplused. A quick inventory showed that it had the following tooling: 3-jaw, 4-jaw, hand-wheel collet closer, 17 collets, face plate, drive plate, threading dial, micrometer carriage stop, collet rack, and bunch of other small stuff. A few items were very rusty, but most of the tooling and the lathe itself was covered with cosmoline. The lathe cleaned-up nicely, and with a new paint job looks like new. Most of the ways still have frosting. I removed the 45 year old 3-phase motor and installed a new single phase unit. The machine runs beautifully. BTW, The lathe is on a cabinet stand with three drawers. I even have the key for the drawers!
.................
Here is what the lathe looked like after I scraped off much of the dirt, and after I did a complete tear down and rebuild. I sold the lathe years ago. I was hoping to find someone who understood the significance of the Springfield Armory tag, but the guy who bought it was more interested in building model steam engines than gunsmithing.

heavy10s.jpg restore.jpg
 

zetec7

Iron
Registered Member
Joined
Nov 20, 2010
Messages
14
Likes
0
#11
I'm pretty new to machining, and I'm almost ashamed to show my lathe (compared to the rest of the machines on here, that are so clean that they look like they were just uncrated from the factory), but what the heck. I love the old girl.

It's a 1947 South Bend 9" X 54" "C" model. I've acquired a milling attachment for it, made a ball-turning attachment, and it's now sporting a QCTP. The old girl (my wife calls it my mistress) is unrestored - the paint is original. When I got it, it had very little tooling beyond a 3-jaw and 4-jaw, and most of its change gears were missing (I have them all now), but there was absolutely zero measurable spindle runout, and the bed ways were good except for the odd ding near the chuck (closer to the chuck, though, than I'm likely to cut), and most of the scrape marks still clear.

There have been several improvements made since the pictures were taken (stainless steel chip pan now, instead of the Tupperware container lid in the picture, nicer lamp, overhead radiant heater for those cold nights in the shop, Phase II toolpost, etc.)

One day I'll probably restore it...but since I use it pretty much daily, I hate to take it out of service...

lathesmall.jpg lathesmall2.jpg ballturnersmall3.jpg
 

ScrapMetal

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
2,048
Likes
119
#13
My SB 11" circa 1939 Model 411A



I really have to take a pic of how I've got it set up now. :eek:

-Ron
 

vstewart5

Swarf
Registered Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2011
Messages
6
Likes
0
#14
Ran accross this thread and have to chime in..Im a newbie from Ohio and am just starting on going thru my 1941 south bend lathe..It's a model 183-B 14-1/2 with a 1.5HP 3 phase motor...Has a few issues and in the process of tearing it down and repainting and fixing the issues...I will post more pict's as it progresses along...
P1010160.jpg

P1010160.jpg
 

Old Iron

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Sep 29, 2010
Messages
1,558
Likes
35
#15
I got this off ebay for 600.00 a few months ago, The different color stuff is from another 13" I was working on. But the bad was well worn so when this one came along I went after it.

Lathe.jpg

Collet Closer stud and nut.

Colletstud.jpg

Colletstud2.jpg

Tool Cart I setting up for it Ya I know its a mess.

Cart1.jpg
 

Attachments

ScrapMetal

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
2,048
Likes
119
#17
I finally took some new pics! :biggrin:

Here is a copy of the card from SB/Grizzly...
Now, in all it's glory (and detail)...
-Ron
 

joebiplane

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Messages
351
Likes
15
#19
Hey South benders !

Is there a list or chart that tells what year a South bend was built by the serial Number???

I am looking for a 1942 lathe to restore as a :drink2:70th Birthday / Christmas gift to myself
:tiphat: thanks...joe diamond@easyliving.com
 

ScrapMetal

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
2,048
Likes
119
#20
According to Steve Well's compilation: http://wswells.com/serial_number.html It looks like the '42 models started somewhere around serial #122000.

Once you find one that you like you can get a copy of the original factory index card for that lathe from Grizzly (who owns the rights to SB now) to verify the year. Here's the "card" from my '39...



As you can see, it has information that can be real useful if you want to restore it to how it came from the factory.

Hope that helps,

-Ron
 

joebiplane

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Messages
351
Likes
15
#21
Thanks Scrap,
Exactly the information i was hoping for.
grizzly charges $25.00 for the ser # card ??? is that correct?
joe
 

vstewart5

Swarf
Registered Member
Joined
Oct 28, 2011
Messages
6
Likes
0
#22
I copied this info and hope it helps also!!!
Although South Bend have comprehensive records of their lathe production (and can quote an exact dispatch date for almost every machine ever made) it is possible, thanks to the efforts of Geoff Swayze, to calculate an approximate date of manufacture - to plus or minus one year or so - if you enter the serial number (stamped at the tailstock-end of the bed) raised to the power of 0.0059 then multiplied by 1812.
The procedure is as follows:
On a scientific calculator (the one with any version of Windows will suffice) enter the serial number, say 84243; then hit the X^Y key (X with a superscript Y); type in 0.0059 then hit the "=" key followed by the multiplication key (*) followed by 1812. You should obtain 1937.4 which is within one year of the real date of manufacture, 1938.
Until a change of policy in 1947 - and a production total of approximately 186,500 lathes - South Bend used a simple sequential numbering system, but after that Serials were broken down between different types of lathe with numbers assigned sequentially within a group. Adding the highest number seen in each category post-1947 to pre-1947, gives a total production of just a over 330,000; however, by the 1970s, South Bend's range was very limited and most of the lathes produced during the last 30 years of the 20th century were the eternally-popular model 10K - a direct descendent of the original 9-inch lathe of the 1030s.
On many South Bend lathes, especially those built before the early 1920s, while the serial number is stamped into the end of the bed at the tailstock end, numbers are also stamped into many other parts - sometimes, but not necessarily, the last three digits of the serial number. These would have been used to identify components taken off an initially assembled lathe for final finishing or painting. Such items might have been
Examples include the top of the leadscrew hanger bearing bracket, the changewheel bracket, the leadscrew, on the concealed surface of the rack where it abuts against the bed and on the inside of the apron, etc,
 

ScrapMetal

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Apr 6, 2011
Messages
2,048
Likes
119
#23

Pacer

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Apr 20, 2011
Messages
430
Likes
9
#24
I bought this 1943 Heavy 10L with 4 1/2 foot bed in May - it was sorely mistreated, with the operators not knowing what an oil can was, or how to use one. Surprisingly tho, it was still in its very original state - never oiled it, and never repaired anything either... which was good, no cobbled up, butchered patches.
So I set out to do a complete tear down, replacing or repairing through out (which was a LOT of replacing) and new paint on reassembly. There are a lot of SB parts floating around, but they can be exasperating to find for your particular lathe, and, can be quite pricey when finally found. So, I made anything that was at all practical/possible in my home shop - 7 gears, about 9 shafts, installing oilite bushings in worn castings, rebuild tail stock and apron, etc. Purchased new lead screw and cross/compound screws and nuts, etc, etc, somewhere around $2500 worth of parts, etc, not counting the hundreds of hours of labor put in it. But, I must stress that my labor on this, and other tools, is my hobby (passion?) and I wouldnt have it any other way...

This was taken shortly after it was unloaded, not only a lot of dirt/crud, but a lot of rust - the tail stock & chuck were removed for hauling...
SouthBendheavy10L001-1.jpg

This is it when I finished it in mid Sept. I added a lot of personal stuff - VFD, the chip tray, the back splash & shelf, QCTP and tool caddy (just behind the chuck) also, note just under the gear box the little tray I fashioned to catch the constant oil drips that an old SB puts out (that is, if you oil it!)

10Lfinished04.jpg

Saw in one of the previous post the shipping card from SB showing all the info on date shipped, who to, bed length, etc. I sent to Grizz and got mine too...

Image0001.jpg

Heres a pic of the head stock gear train and gear box giving an idea of some of the work that can go in just this section of the lathe...

Gearshaftsreplacesnag-it.jpg

And, sprinkled all through the tear down, you will run into stuff like this tail stock clamp plate in this pitiful state of "repair" and the replacement I made...

Tailstockclamp001.jpg
 

Attachments

joebiplane

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 22, 2010
Messages
351
Likes
15
#25
Coop,

You have my dream machine (except I want one to restore myself )....1942 model A on April 1st your machine and I will be " 70 " . Sure wish I looked as good as your SB
Joebiplane
 

lazyLathe

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2011
Messages
173
Likes
0
#26
:thumbzup:Now that is what i call a restoration!!!!:worship:

Andrew
 
N

Nelson

Guest - Please Register!
Guest - Please Register!
#27
Made a great article for the Home Page!


:tiphat:
Nelson
 

irishwoodsman

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Nov 19, 2011
Messages
965
Likes
2
#28
Coop,

You have my dream machine (except I want one to restore myself )....1942 model A on April 1st your machine and I will be " 70 " . Sure wish I looked as good as your SB
Joebiplane
great job on the restoration, patience always pays off.
 

Tommie D

Active User
Active Member
Joined
Dec 18, 2011
Messages
54
Likes
9
#29
Here she is! My model B after 20+ years of neglect (by me). I bought this back in the late 80's to do a side job so that it could pay for it's self. I used it for a few weeks then parked it in my sister's garage where it has been ever since. Tonight I went over and moved a bunch of "stuff" that was in front of it and pulled the cover off of it. To my suprise it wasen't a total rust bucket. From what I could find out it's a 1946 model. Serial number 178706, The numbers across on the other side of the bed are B101, Their is very poor lighting in her garage but when I looked at the change gear cover it had what looks like catalog number 477Z and bed length 3 1/2 ft. Their was even the original can of SouthBend spindle oil sitting on the bench. Right after I bought it I remember that I contacted SouthBend and ordered a parts manual and a few other things for it. I will have to look around for that stuff but I have a feeling it is in one of the many boxes I left at my old house. I sure am glad my oldest son still lives there.


030.JPG 031.JPG

030.JPG 031.JPG
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top