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SIEG X2 Y Axis Stock Screw Dimensional Drawing?

MetalMuncher

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Feb 16, 2014
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Agreed, this is when mine binds, in the middle of a job but it’s only when the Y-axis is almost at its end. Speaking of, can you post a picture of your spacer ?
I've had mine bind at any position along the Y axis. It can jam so hard as to stall the power drive, and be extremely hard to turn by hand. Or, one time, back when I still "gently snugged" the screw as the manual recommends, the screw loosened enough that the top heavy Y xis nut flopped over and completely out of its driven slot. One thing I have not yet tried is getting a replacement nut retainer screw with a slug of nylon embedded in it to lock it in place, similar to the upgrade screws LMS sells so you don't need locking nuts on your gib screws (those work very well!). I've had trouble finding such screws, because I don't know what the industry calls them, so descriptive searches lead nowhere.

I've posted a drawing image of it earlier in the thread in post # 20 which shows the detail of its construction. It is installed now, so if I took a photo of it, all you are going to see is the top of an aluminum rectangle 0.540" thick, matching the width of the crank bearing support block.

One thing I didn't mention before is that adding such a spacer makes it possible for the saddle carrying the table to move toward you beyond being flush in the front of the base casting. Theoretically you could go further with a wider spacer. But since I have a belt driven power drive on the Y axis crank's shaft boss, I could only go this far without having some things make undesirable contact out in front. The power drive uses micro switches to shut it down at both ends of my chosen allowable travel. And to reiterate, this does not "extend" the travel of the Y axis. It "moves" the same amount of overall travel the screw normally allows, placing it further toward the crank, solely to gain space between the back of the table and the face of the solid column, for my DRO scale mounted there.
 
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homebrewed

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FWIW, early on I did have a problem with the OEM Y axis bearing block. The feed screw shaft passing through the block had no lube, so it eventually seized up. I had to remove the feed screw/block and drive the feed screw out with a (soft) hammer. To fix it, I polished the end of the feed screw and the hole through the block and lubed it up well before re-assembling. It's quite possible the thing seized up due to misalignment so things were rubbing.
 

MetalMuncher

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Feb 16, 2014
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It has always amazed me that SIEG doesn't provide any lubrication from the factory on many of the moving parts on their lathes and mills. By comparison, Grizzly will tell you to lubricate their G0752 lathe in several places every time you run it. And their main gears run in an oil bath sump with a "sight glass" to check the oil level.
 
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