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Slitting saw use

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chucksterock

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I need to make a protective cover for a test sample that has some fragile thermocouples sticking up. The current plan is a chunk of nylon with a cavity milled out and then slots cut into the walls for the sample to slide into and by held captive by. Now the trick is that the width of the slots is only 1.5 inches. Width of the slot is .125 inches. I'm thinking that a slitting saw could do that, but it would be cutting both slots at the same time. Climb cut on one side and conventional on the other. I'm hoping the saving grace is that it's only cutting nylon. But then I know plastics can be tricky too, so maybe it's the opposite of a saving grace. Any words or wisdom out there? Thank you!
 

BaronJ

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#2
Your question doesn't make much sense ! I think that you need to do a sketch of what you are trying to do.
 

T Bredehoft

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#3
Cutting plastic with a slitting saw, the climb/regular cutting isn't much of a problem. Just keep everything secure and use some lubricant.
 

P. Waller

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#4
If you are building an assembly that employs sensitive data monitoring components why are you asking questions in a hobby forum?

Would it not be more productive to ask such questions in a venue more suited to what you are trying to do?
 

JimDawson

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If you are building an assembly that employs sensitive data monitoring components why are you asking questions in a hobby forum?

Would it not be more productive to ask such questions in a venue more suited to what you are trying to do?
Because there are a few thousand years of combined experience here. Many of our members make chips professionally, and even those that don't, have widely varied skills and experience. That's what makes H-M so great. :)

To answer the OP's question: Nylon can be a bit tricky in that it is a bit sticky to machine. Turn the saw much slower than you think you should, adjust the feed as needed. Keep it cutting, don't let the saw rub. As said above use some kind of lube, just about any oil would work. Try to clear the chips in the saw gullets with an air blast while cutting.
 

mikey

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#6
Now the trick is that the width of the slots is only 1.5 inches. Width of the slot is .125 inches. I'm thinking that a slitting saw could do that, but it would be cutting both slots at the same time. Climb cut on one side and conventional on the other.
Chucksterock, I think the way you're describing the cut is causing some confusion and that impacts on our ability to answer you. Are you saying the slot must be 0.125" high and 1.5" long? If so, then a slitting saw will easily cut that with a plunge cut but it will leave a radius at the ends of the slot. If the ends of the slot must be square then an end mill might be a better solution.

More information would be really helpful.
 

BaronJ

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#7
Hi Guys,

One important thing that hasn't been mentioned is that plastics, Nylon in particular, absorbs water and swells, as I recently discovered !
If the job Chucksterock is doing, requires any precision he needs to take this into account.
 

PHPaul

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#8


As I read the description, this is what I think he is trying to accomplish.

The "dado" is 1.5 inches wide and he wants to cut .125 inch slots on both sides to slide a circuit board into.
 

RJSakowski

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#9
If the material isn't locked in, I would choose Delrin over Nylon. Comparably priced, similar mechanical and thermal properties, better electrical properties, and machines better than Nylon.
 

mikey

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#10


As I read the description, this is what I think he is trying to accomplish.

The "dado" is 1.5 inches wide and he wants to cut .125 inch slots on both sides to slide a circuit board into.
Well, that does make a difference. The OP needs to clarify.
 
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