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Speeds And Feeds : Canedy-otto 20" , Model 36 Camelback Dp

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Glenn Brooks

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#1
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Hello All,

I just picked up a really nice Canedy-Otto Model 36 (20" ) drill press. It has the power feed gearing and five speed cone belt pully set up, with low speed backgear. Also two drive cones on the bottom shaft for the original belt driven countershaft. Everything appears to be in really good shape and operable.

However the drive motor and original countershaft are missing. So I haven't seen it in operation yet.

The lower shaft has a v belt pully attached, so I guess the machine was driven off a now absent electric motor.

So, can anyone tell me the proper size modern motor would be to drive this model DP? I have a really nice older 1 hp 110/220 I could use, if it is the right size.

Also, more importantly, does anyone know what speed I step down the electric motor shaft output RPM to operate the DP within its designed speed range.

And what are the factory speeds normally encountered with the five step cone pully and back gears???

Oh yeh, I guess I don't know a thing about what the two drive belt pulleys do that are mounted on the bottom shaft at the rear of the DP. I read somewhere one is a tension pully, the other a slack pully? What does that mean exactly??

Thanks very much for any assistance you might be able to offer.

Pictures:
1) side view - stands 67" tall, fits perfectly laying down in the bed of my Ford Ranger
2) power down feed gearing
3) back gear for slooow drill speeds - slowest is around 36 rpm apparently
4) acme feed shaft to raise and lower table.

Best regards,

Glenn
 

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mzayd3

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#2
A single hp motor should be adequate. I'd try what you have and see how it goes. As far as the speed reduction, I don't really know.


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talvare

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#3
Sounds like you found a nice machine. Here's a pretty handy calculator you can use to figure out your spindle speeds. Spindle RPM really depends on the type of work you'll be doing with the drill press. I have found that my drill press never has a slow enough speed. I would like to make some modifications to it so I could have a range of speeds between 100 and 500 RPM.

http://www.blocklayer.com/pulley-belteng.aspx

Ted
 

John4

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#4
The slack/tension pulleys at the bottom I think are from when it was driven by a overhead line shaft . I think there was a fork arrangement to slide flat belt from drive pulley to idler pulley.

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Silverbullet

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She's beautiful , I would think your motor will power it , but watch the speed to the cone pulleys . You may need larger pulley at the cone then what's there . And smaller on the motor. I'd guess the speed should be 500 rpm or less at the lower cone. Good luck with her and take care of her .
 

benmychree

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#6
I have a Canedy Otto 21" drill similar to your 20"; the spindle speeds are posted on the nameplate as:
back gear:
30, 56, 90, 156

direct:
395, 220, 170, 140
note that the two ranges overlap!
I have a 1750 rpm motor with a 3 1/2" pulley and a 16" pulley on the countershaft, and have a top speed of 350 RPM, there should be probably a (nearly) 4" pulley on the motor. My machine has a factory motor base to the right of the column, and was built in 1947. I suspect your drill should run about 400 RPM or a bit more. 500 RPM on the lower cone would be way too fast, I'd guess about 350 might be close to the mark, but without knowing the pulley diameters and the gear ratio or numbers of teeth of the bevel gears it is impossible to say exactly.
 

Cactus Farmer

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#7
I ,too, have the same machine. It's powered by a 1 1/2 HP 3 PH motor that is as big as my modern 5 HP single phase. Mine was missing the small belt for the back gear arrangement. I had a local machine repair make me a new one. My flat belt pulleys are worn too, so the necessary duct tape was applied to keep the belts on. Low,low will drill a 2" hole with the power feed in A-36 plate. You can hear the metal being sheared! Strong as an ox!!
 

FOMOGO

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#8
That's a real beauty Glenn. Color me green with envy. I agree that your motor would probably be fine if it's 1750 or lower rpm, and you take advantage of the 220v option. Congrats on the score. Mike
 

benmychree

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#9
I do not have an original motor on mind, but a 3 phase 1 1/2 HP Century off a York Refrigeration condensing unit, it is a "soft start" type and comes up to speed gently. I built a scotch boiler years ago and drilled the tube sheet of flange quality boiler plate with power feed at a decent speed. Perhaps you could re crown your feed pulleys and do away with the duct tape. My machine was bought new by a tractor dealer, it had a pressed sheet metal pulley on the countershaft that caused the belt to roll over and slip; consequently it was little used and in near perfect condition when I bought it in the late 1960s the table was nearly completely innocent of holes, and has very few "peck marks" to this day. A friend has a similar drill, and there is not any original surface left on the table, just craters.
 

Glenn Brooks

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Thanks all, lots of good info here. The DP awaits me adding the motor latter in the spring. Haven’t done anything yet to clean it up or add power, mostly due to pre existing projects dragging on for ever. The existing finish and old coating of oil has preserved the cast and machined surfaces nicely. Haven’t been able to justify stripping the old gunk off and exposing the metal underneath to the revenges of Washington winter rust bucket wet season. But, I have some upcoming work for it in a few months, so maybe the big drill bits will get a real workout.

Glenn
 
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