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Spray Or Brush Paint A Machine?

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great white

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#31
I'm just using a spray on (rattlecan) black hammer tone on my Atlas. It works fine for my use.

A good degreasing if the paint is still in good shape and then respray. For parts that are chipped and flaking, I use aircraft stripper and then degrease and spray.

I'm not overly worried about the durability/layer thickness of the paint, if it chips or wears its an easy touch up.

I use the hammer tone as the surface finish of the Atlas isn't smooth anyways. The hammer tone just works with the surface irregularities.

I just want my old lathe clean and usable. Had the old green paint been in good shape, I probably wouldn't have even bothered to repaint.

It isn't a show queen, but a nice coat of paint makes everything feel just that little bit nicer when you use it.

:)
 
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AR1911

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#32
I have always sprayed paint. Sometimes automotive paint, later industrial paint, through an HVLP gun. But now I only use Plastikote (Valspar) engine enamel. It is made to spray on bare cast iron, adheres well to aluminum, tolerates chemicals, and has a low-gloss appropriate to machine tools. Over time it has proven durable. Lately I mostly use #216 New Ford gray.
 

Eddyde

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#33
I am thinking about using bed liner for a machine coating, seems like it would be practically indestructible. Has anyone tried using it that way?
 

AR1911

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#34
Ack! Please don't do that to a nice machine!
 

great white

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#35
I am thinking about using bed liner for a machine coating, seems like it would be practically indestructible. Has anyone tried using it that way?
It adds a fair bit of thickness to parts. I'd take that into account for parts you have to fit back together once coated.

Personally, I wouldn't use it.

:)
 

Eddyde

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#36
Ack! Please don't do that to a nice machine!
I think if done carefully with the right product, one could achieve a reasonably nice finish. It is not only what the machine looks like when you are done painting it that matters, it's also what it looks like a few years later.
 

silence dogood

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#37
When you guys prepare a machine for paint, what do you do with the old surface? I have a mill that looks pretty rough and some of the paint, and filler underneath, is soft from the coolant and way oil that it has seen in its life. I don't have the time to go over it thoroughly to clean it down to bare and repaint. Will a bit of bondo over the seriously cratered areas stick? Will the paint stick to it?
Right now, if you don't have the time to prepare the machine to paint, just do what you have been doing. In other words keep it wiped off and oiled. You are just wasting your time if you don't properly prep before you paint. It does not matter what paint or/and filler that you use, that paint will not stick well at all to grease, oil, dirt, and whatever.
 
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f350ca

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#38
When you guys prepare a machine for paint, what do you do with the old surface? I have a mill that looks pretty rough and some of the paint, and filler underneath, is soft from the coolant and way oil that it has seen in its life. I don't have the time to go over it thoroughly to clean it down to bare and repaint. Will a bit of bondo over the seriously cratered areas stick? Will the paint stick to it?
As said above, unless the surface is TOTALLY oil free paint or bond won't stick. A simple test is to spray the surface with water, if it beads the paint won't stick, if it spreads and wets the entire surface your probably good to go. Wiping a surface with a solvent soaked rag just spreads the oil. I've had the best luck with citrus based water soluble degreasers. Scrub the surface with the solvent then rinse off with water.
_MG_3404.jpg
 

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TommyD

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#39
My dad swore by porch & floor enamel. We painted everything with it including a crane truck.
I am using it on a Dake #2 arbor press I'm fixin' up in my gay-raj, alkylid enamel applied after a good scraping off of the old flaking paint with a acetone cleaner. I'm hoping multi coating will smooth out the poor casting on the frame, gawd it is rough.

I'd attach pictures but for some reason my tablet keeps losing internet connection when I try to attach photos.
 

Morten

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#40
Bengalack/Arcanol

IMG_8892.JPG
 

63redtudor

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#41
+1 on the New Ford Gray engine paint. I used it on the little Crafstman 109 I rebuilt, mainly because I all ready had it on hand. When I rebuilt my grandpa's Sheldon I just continued using it. I like it as dirt and grime show up well, and as an engine paint it holds up against oil pretty well. I have access to a paint booth which helps as well.
 

Glenn Brooks

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#42
Just painted my new to me Burke #4 mill with a polyurethane Interlux marine undercoat ( because I had some left over) and a top coat of polyurethane single part Interlux marine top sides in Kingstone Gray ( again had a quart left over). Degreased and prepped everything with acetone and white shop rags. Used a cheap chip brush on both. The marine top sides paints have a nice levelling agent and flow pretty smoothly. Didn't like the color so put a second coat on using existing left over custom dark gray-blue rustoleum enamel ( ahaha more left over) that matches my Dalton lathe. So both machines are properly color coordinated! If only the rest of my shop was in such good shape.

I was going to spray everything, but when I went to buy the spray gun, learned I needed a $200 high capacity air compressor - which made my $30 spray job jump to $350 once all the additional accessories were laid out. Apparently the small 5- 10 gallon air compressors don't put out enuf air, resulting in blobs of paint being intermittently thrown onto the work, rather than a smooth glossy finish.

So nixed that, and experimented with a 4" fine cell foam roller for the final top coat. The foam roller turned out great. I like it a lot better than brushing. Almost as good as spraying and a much better than brushing. No steaks or brush marks anywhere. So never going back to brushs for refurbishing machine tools again. Maybe when I find a decent second hand high capacity air compressor I might consider spray painting again - but for now, a $10 package of foam rollers does a fantastic job.
 
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