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Standard Engineering Works Mill

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paoldschool

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#1
So today I purchased a new to me, very old Standard Engineering Works #2 (I think), horizontal milling machine. It is a little rough around the edges, but it is mostly all there. The only information I have been able to find is a few pictures on Vintage Machinery dot org. I was wondering if anyone has ever used one or seen one for that matter. I know it has a Brown and Sharp #9 spindle, 12 spindle speeds and four x axis feed speeds. It has a single over arm, and a 7 x 29ish inch table. Oh and.the most important part, it's REALLY HEAVY!!! I'm guessing about 1,200 pounds, or so... I will get some pictures as.soon as it is off the trailer.
 

Martin W

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#2
Congrats on the new mill Waiting for pictures.
Cheers
Martin
 

benmychree

John York
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#3
Pictures rule!
 

brino

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#4
Congratulations!
I am "watching".
-brino
 

paoldschool

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#5
So here it is, off the trailer and in the shop. The motor was replaced at some point with a much smaller one. So I am on the hunt for a 1 hp motor to put back on it. The only problems that I have found is that it is extremely dirty... I guess that is most old machines. Really the indicator dial that the feed selector rides on is broken in half. One of the spindle speed selector levers is broken, and the chain that holds the counter weight in the column for the main head is broken. Oh, and the door on the rear of the main casting that actually has the company name on it is missing. It should be a fun project, and a great addition to my shop!!! Mill1.jpg Mill1.jpg
 

FOMOGO

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#6
Looks like a keeper. A little love and she will look like new. Cheers, Mike
 

paoldschool

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#7
Mill3.jpg Mill2.jpg
Here are a couple more. I am thinking about documenting the tear down and restoration of this machine on YouTube. We shall see!!!
 

paoldschool

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#8
So I moved the mill into it's new home in my shop today. Did a bit more exploring, and lubed everything up good. The most amazing thing to me is it used 2" wide chain to drive the motor to main gear box, and gear box to spindle. It makes less noise than the belt drive on my modern vertical mill!!! It is smooth as silk. I started knocking the first layer of crud off also. I really can't wait to go through everything and start making some chips with this old mill!
 

benmychree

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#9
That is why it is called a "Silent Chain" My 1925 Dodge uses one to drive its starter/generator.
 
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#10
Isn't it amazing how we use to build things. Last for fifty a hundred years and still easy to get right back into new condition. No vee belt made today will ever compare to the chain drive of yesteryear. Just my opinions of our now it has to be new every few years or throw away nation.
 

paoldschool

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#11
I love old machinery. It is just durable and works. Most of the time repairs can be made with off the shelf parts, bearings, etc, that can had easily. Even if some "special" part is needed, they can be easily made most of the time. Even complex parts can now be modeled and printed, then cast again in metal. Not to mention it is just plain fun to rebuild and run these machines.
 
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