[4]

T-slot cutter questions

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

Suzuki4evr

Registered
Registered
Joined
Sep 29, 2017
Messages
344
Likes
376
#1
Hi guys.

I don't have experience in using T-slot cutters and have a couple of questions.

I am using BMS to make a QCTP attachment and need to make a T-slot. I have a 8mm cutter. My questions is,what is the ideal rpm? Do you climb mill or conventional mill? What should the dept of cut be? And should the cutter touch at the bottom or not. Any extra advise would be appreciated.

Thank you
Michael
 

benmychree

John York
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Jun 7, 2013
Messages
2,225
Likes
1,664
#2
Of course, a slot is first made with an end mill or other cutter to finished width, then the tee slot cutter is centered in the slot, flush with the bottom of the slot, and the cut is made, cutting on both sides of the slot at once, in effect, climb milling on one side and conventional milling on the other; the diameter of the tee slot cutter defines the width of the tee slot, although, some slight adjustment of the tee slot cutter on either side of the center of the tee a lot is possible, but not much, as the shank of tee slot cutter is not much smaller than the slot itself.
 

markba633csi

H-M Supporter - Gold Member
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Apr 30, 2015
Messages
2,760
Likes
1,430
#3
Excuse me what is BMS?
Mark
 

hman

Active User
H-M Platinum Supporter ($50)
Joined
Feb 17, 2013
Messages
1,726
Likes
1,351
#4
bright mild steel
 

NortonDommi

Registered
Registered
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
292
Likes
181
#5
Hi Suzuki4evr,
When you say you have a 8mm cutter ist this for a 8mm stud? If so the standard width for the slot is 10mm. The total depth is 17-21mm. The width of the top of the 'T' is 16-18mm and the depth of the top of the 'T' is 7-8mm.
I cut basically as benmychree says. Run a 10mm slot cutter through to the required depth then center and follow through with the T-slot cutter.
Speed would be about 440 - 550 for 80 ft/min and 100 ft/min surface speed respectively. Adjust as fit. NOTE: Chips are cutter killers so running a vacuum and blowing or flushing with coolant is a must.
 

Suzuki4evr

Registered
Registered
Joined
Sep 29, 2017
Messages
344
Likes
376
#6
Of course, a slot is first made with an end mill or other cutter to finished width, then the tee slot cutter is centered in the slot, flush with the bottom of the slot, and the cut is made, cutting on both sides of the slot at once, in effect, climb milling on one side and conventional milling on the other; the diameter of the tee slot cutter defines the width of the tee slot, although, some slight adjustment of the tee slot cutter on either side of the center of the tee a lot is possible, but not much, as the shank of tee slot cutter is not much smaller than the slot itself.
Hi benmychree.

I get what you are saying, but the application is not for a t-nut,but for a QCTP attachment, so the T-gap so to speak is too far appart for the cutter to be cutting at both sides simultaneously. So must I go full depth or less,making a cupple of passes?
 

NortonDommi

Registered
Registered
Joined
Nov 15, 2016
Messages
292
Likes
181
#8
Take a piece of paper and draw what you need to do. QCTP attachment? Is this holding a QCTP down onto a compound slide or mount? Pencil and paper are the quickest way to sort out a strategy to arrive at an endpoint.
 

Suzuki4evr

Registered
Registered
Joined
Sep 29, 2017
Messages
344
Likes
376
#9
I might have named it wrong,it is a QCTP Tool holder,but here it is.
20180704_103112.jpg
20180704_103102.jpg
20180704_103200.jpg
Hope this will give an idea.
 

FOMOGO

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Sep 2, 2013
Messages
1,782
Likes
1,709
#10
I would say cut the center section with a conventional end mill, then take .020-.050 per pass on the sides depending on your mill. No real need to take it all at once. Mike
 

rgray

Active User
H-M Supporter - Gold Member ($25)
Joined
Nov 26, 2012
Messages
1,001
Likes
520
#11
If you have rigidity you can climb mill it. More likely to conventional mill and climb mill the finish cut for a nice looking finish.
That's how I've done QCTP holders, only mine were dovetail.
Center section where an end mill can remove the bulk of the material is deeper by .005 or so on my store bought ones. Less cutter rubbing when cutting the slot that way.
 

Suzuki4evr

Registered
Registered
Joined
Sep 29, 2017
Messages
344
Likes
376
#12
I thank everyone for their input and advice and that is what I like about this site. I browsed through other sites and I've noticed that on some of those sites the people can get really nasty and to others if the person is new to machining or don't don't grasp what others are trying to help him with,and I don't understand why they do it,but I don't see that here. And that is why we are on this site isn't it, to help each other.

Besides all of that now, what I did at the end of the day is combine all of the info I got and got the job done. First tried cutting rpm at about 400rpm and went up to 700 and full depth. But I didn't force the cutter and it went pretty well. Took n 0.025" final pass and it had a nice finnish. The other side I took smaller cuts but I could go a but faster on the freed (hand feed). So thank you all,I am sure next wiil go even better an with more confidence.

Good day to all and thank you for being such standup people on this forum.

Michael
 

Suzuki4evr

Registered
Registered
Joined
Sep 29, 2017
Messages
344
Likes
376
#14
Thank you Norton,it is much appreciated.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top