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T-slotted Cross Slide

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Happycamper

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#1
I am planning on ordering one of the MLA cross slide castings for my Logan and have a question. Does it matter which side of the cross slide the gib is on? I would want to install my DRO scale on the right side. Currently on the stock cross slide that’s where I have it and it is a pain to get to the gib screws. So, I was thinking that on the new cross slide I would move the gib to the left or head stock side of the cross slide. Anyone see any problems with that?
 

T Bredehoft

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#2
I've an Atlas/Clausing MK 2, I'm sure we'll all agree its a pretty light lathe. With my four way tool post, turning and parting tools are off to the left of the cross slide. I have put steel gibs in both compound and cross slide. Unless I really crank down on the gibs, any amount of cut wants to lift the right side, where the gibs is/are. If the gibs was on the left side perhaps I wouldn't need it so tight.
 

Cadillac

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#3
Your not gonna wanna do that. Gib on the left puts the play on the side of all the cutting forces. Would think you’d get nothing but chatter. Doing a tapered gib would solve your problems.
 

Happycamper

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#4
I was looking at that Caddy. It seems to me that a right hand cut toward the headstock forces the cutter and holder and thus the compound toward the right. It appears to me the dove tail cuts on that side without the gib is where the force would cause the cross slide and saddle to be forced together to form a more rigid set up. Now having said that, all that theory flies out the window when making left hand cuts toward the tail stock. That’s why I’m asking. I would hate to machine the casting for a left side gib and then cause more problems. As far as doing a tapered gib, wouldn’t that require a change in dove tail angle on both cross slide and saddle?
 

Rob

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#5
I can't speak for a Logan but I have a MLA T Slot cross slide on my Atlas Lathe. I have also never operated it with the gibs on the headstock side. On the Atlas the nut is located in the center of the cross slide and I can put the cross slide on either way so that would allow for placing the gib on the right or left. All I have to do is move the button that my compound mounts on to the front of the lathe.
 

Cadillac

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#6
For all accuracy purposes you are not suppose to cut towards the tailstock anyways. I know theirs the exception but you should make your cuts towards the headstock.
 

benmychree

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#7
I was looking at that Caddy. It seems to me that a right hand cut toward the headstock forces the cutter and holder and thus the compound toward the right. It appears to me the dove tail cuts on that side without the gib is where the force would cause the cross slide and saddle to be forced together to form a more rigid set up. Now having said that, all that theory flies out the window when making left hand cuts toward the tail stock. That’s why I’m asking. I would hate to machine the casting for a left side gib and then cause more problems. As far as doing a tapered gib, wouldn’t that require a change in dove tail angle on both cross slide and saddle?
Fact is that one hardly ever cuts toward the tailstock, and if heavy cutting were done in that direction, the tailstock would likely slip on the ways. Turning the cross slide around is not a good idea, the thrust of a cut should not be taken against a few small screws.
 

Cadillac

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#8
Although on my lathe the compound slide put parrallel with the lathe axis puts the tapered gib at the forces of the cut. A good reason why many take compound off and make a solid tool post. I've made for both my 9x20 and 14x40.
I can't honestly tell you about the angles on the taper. Just thinking here but top and bottom are parrallel, dovetail side angle of dovetail casting side would be the tapered side parrallel to the dovetail. Yeah?
 
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Happycamper

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#9
I usually thread toward the tailstock with my cutter upside down. I thread a lot of barrels and that is about the easiest way to do it threading from a shoulder. Haven’t had any problems with the tailstock giving. But, I don’t know of any lathes that don't have the gib on the right side. Must be a reason for it. I’ll just have to figure out a way to mount the scale and still have access to the gib screws.
 

chips&more

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#10
Just read this post and I must say a lot is going on. On my Clausing 14” I cut to left, I cut to right, I thread in both directions, Have threaded with the cutter upside down and everything is happy no problems. Oh and my tailstock doesn’t move/fly off either…Dave
 

chips&more

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#11
After thinking overnight, some lathes more so the earlier ones, espically with babbitt bearings, did not like to have a cut made from left to right. And the carriage is designed for downward forces. If you turn a tool bit upside down. Be aware of the possible play and loss of rigidity…Dave.
 

Low tech

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#12
My Logan model 1955 has the cross slide gib on the right side . My Leblond Servo Shift has the cross slide gib and compound slide gib on the left side .
 
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