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Table-Top or Toolpost Shaper

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Here's a "working" concept of a small shaper. The design goal is for it to work in the lathe via a toolholder in the toolpost or, on a small table-top fixture. The main use will be for cutting fairly small keyways in pulleys or gear bores. I'm also using this project to learn Fusion 360 after many years of Alibre CAD.

The design is based on the classic Whitworth "Quick Return" slider/shaper mechanism. This is the first time I've used a CAD program for all the conceptual diagrams. I did not use a pencil or notepad for hand sketches like I usually do. I used pencil/paper only for a handful of trig problems and also to calculate the position, torque and speed of the slider rod given the small gear motor that was selected for the project.

This diagram is no-where near what it will finally look like. This diagram only shows the mechanical model to prove-out the basic design. My design goal was to have a shaper that had an adjustable stroke up to 3.25". Fusion 360 has stress analysis and simulation abilities and this conceptual model was used to verify the range of motion and stress areas. The computer model actually "works", in that the motor shaft can be turned and all members move accordingly. It was a fun little project to learn Fusion 360.

For reference, in this model, the slider rod is 8.5" long. The block that holds the slider is theoretically pinned in this model as is the motor and the plate that the assembly is mounted on.
Shaper Concept.JPG

The gear motor will be here in a couple weeks along with a fresh supply of small bearings. I'll work on the model until I'm happy with the "final" design and then I'll build it. Most of the components you see are in their final form but, the enclosure, clapper box and self adjusting mechanism is not even started yet. That will be pretty cut-and-dry.

I'll post a few more pictures at various milestones as things progress.

Ray
 

Comments

At every level, the tools employed impact any given situation. snip
I’m not sure what you mean by “impact”. The spectrum of impact is broad.

Writing prose is a creative process. There is a significant element of creativity even in documentary writing. The author does not have to alter his/her understanding of language, grammar, sentence structure, theme, etc. to use any number of tools. I can create the same text by putting pencil/pen to paper, using a typewriter or numerous word processing applications, all without any perceptible change to my creative thought process.

When it comes to CAD tools, the producers of the tools seem to think it’s of no significance that a user’s creative thought process must be altered to agree with the tool’s paradigm. It’s so common that I suspect it must be a goal. I don’t know why.

I read all of the quoted reply and the examples you described were easily doable in ProE, 20 years ago, without all the history bookkeeping that is necessary to maintain reasonable model serviceability in Fusion 360. I haven’t heard any advantages of the multiple-component-within-a-component paradigm.

Common (linked) dimensions between multiple models, families of models, mathematically calculated dimensions driven by formulas (relations) and more were all easily done in ProE 20 years ago. All these relationships were automatically applied at the next regeneration of the affected file(s).

I understand that simulation capabilities such as motion, FEA, fit/tolerance analysis, etc. are much better integrated into many CAD tools today. However, I think it’s an aberration that a conventional “parts’ and “assemblies” paradigm has to be altered/translated to use a high end tool from a long standing supplier.

This isn’t a controversy that I need to pursue further in your thread. Already the thread is more about using Fusion 360 than about the shaper. I’ll be happy to let it lie.
 
Ray C said it up front, The purpose of this article is to self teach Fusion 360, not specifically to design a small shaper. I think he has and is doing a remarkable job, in both cases. The fact that he chose the more complicated mechanism of a quick return, was mainly part of the learning process in the program, and not specifically to make a better shaper. I think he is doing it elegantly well.

benmychree is, I think, making unnecessary criticism and stirring, and, as you say, not exactly breaking the rules, but being mischievous. A small slap on the wrist should suffice, but if he persists then perhaps some loss of privilege might be in order. I'm not generally in favour of overactive punishment for small infringements.

In writing this I'm assuming that because I can then I'm permitted to. If I'm out of order, please say so, and I'll keep quiet.

Downunder Bob
 
All,

Be apprised that the gear-motor won't be here for another week or so. Without it, I cannot get exact dimensions to model it. That's got progress slowed-down just a little bit.

This project has two purposes; one is to make a little shaper suitable for mounting in a toolpost holder on the lathe. It would be ideal to cut keyways for pulleys and/or gears while they're still mounted in the lathe. I also intend to make a fixture so it can be used on the table top as well. The other part of this is to learn Fusion 360. This weekend, I was going to start making some parts but, I was swamped with yard work and other chores and couldn't find time to work in the shop. In the interim, it's perfectly fine to chat (and vent if the need arises) about CAD.

extropic. I know how you feel... In the 80's and early 90's, I was perfectly happy with Ultrix/Unix and BSD/SunOS. Then came Windows-based operating systems and progress came to grinding halt. It took 15+ years for windows XP to become available whereby I could almost accomplish 50% of what I took for granted using BSD/SunOS. I was not happy that we got Windows rammed down our throats.

As for ProE. I'm not familiar with it but assume you are. It is now available as a product called Creo. The original ProE appears to have been acquired and/or diversified over the years. Along the way, I'll bet the program you once knew has changed a lot. FWIW, I get pretty annoyed each time Microsoft makes big changes to the Office products. I know how you feel...

Downunder...
Life is good and we'll see how things go. I'm just posting when I have something to show and will show pictures at various milestones. I'm not trying to do "tutorial" write-ups these days. Folks can just ask questions if the need arises and I'll gladly help if I can.

Ray
 
All,

Be apprised that the gear-motor won't be here for another week or so. Without it, I cannot get exact dimensions to model it. That's got progress slowed-down just a little bit.

This project has two purposes; one is to make a little shaper suitable for mounting in a toolpost holder on the lathe. It would be ideal to cut keyways for pulleys and/or gears while they're still mounted in the lathe. I also intend to make a fixture so it can be used on the table top as well. The other part of this is to learn Fusion 360. This weekend, I was going to start making some parts but, I was swamped with yard work and other chores and couldn't find time to work in the shop. In the interim, it's perfectly fine to chat (and vent if the need arises) about CAD.

extropic. I know how you feel... In the 80's and early 90's, I was perfectly happy with Ultrix/Unix and BSD/SunOS. Then came Windows-based operating systems and progress came to grinding halt. It took 15+ years for windows XP to become available whereby I could almost accomplish 50% of what I took for granted using BSD/SunOS. I was not happy that we got Windows rammed down our throats.

As for ProE. I'm not familiar with it but assume you are. It is now available as a product called Creo. The original ProE appears to have been acquired and/or diversified over the years. Along the way, I'll bet the program you once knew has changed a lot. FWIW, I get pretty annoyed each time Microsoft makes big changes to the Office products. I know how you feel...

Downunder...
Life is good and we'll see how things go. I'm just posting when I have something to show and will show pictures at various milestones. I'm not trying to do "tutorial" write-ups these days. Folks can just ask questions if the need arises and I'll gladly help if I can.

Ray
Like what you're doing Ray, keep it up. bad luck about the delay on the motor. still Rome wasn't built in a day

Likewise, I was perfectly happy with DOS3. was writing my own programs in QB4 got to fairly good at it. Then they had to bring out windows, resisted for as long as I could, but finally succumbed. HAd to give up programming, was getting to hard. Eventually got like win xp so they upgraded and upgraded, I stayed with xp, but eventually had to buy a new computer, it came with win7, finally came to terms with it, and you guessed it win 8 had taken over, then my laptop needed replacing and it was win 10. I've just about given up. the learning curve is getting harder and taking up so much time I'm missing out on what I want to do. The regular changes to office 365 drive me crazy.
 
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