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Take the drill out of the tailstock when you're done drilling

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willthedancer

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#1
Unless you like trips to the sawbones for stitches.

Reaching past a drill is .......

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strantor

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#2
pulled a stuck collet out of the spindle once; when it came free I jabbed the back of my elbow into the live center I left in the tailstock. Wasn't anything to consult a doctor over, but it conclude my lathe operations for the day. Good thing it wasn't a drill bit.
 

Ulma Doctor

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#4
done it :bawling:
 

stupoty

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#5
live centers and drills are a good one for a spiky accident , owch

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Uglydog

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#6
Like this?

Daryl
MN
 

higgite

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#7
Is it cruel to "like" the posts in this thread? :grin:

But, I've been there, done that, too, and got the bloody tee shirt. And that's not meant as a British expression, that's literally a bloody tee shirt.

Tom
 

fretsman

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#8
lol, yep, I did this ONCE..........never again......
 

Ben Nevis

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#9
Also known as a case of turner's elbow.....

BTDT
 

Frank Ford

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#10
While teaching the intro to milling machine class at TechShop, I warned the students of the danger in leaving an end mill in the collet, and as I talked, I gestured over at it, neatly slicing the back of my hand, just enuf to draw a bit of blood and a few chuckles. . .
 

brasssmanget

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#11
I leave a center drill bit in a chuck stored in one hole of the collet rack, and I've scraped that thing many times reaching for something else in the rack. I now cover it with a thick doubled piece of rag.
 

stupoty

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#12
While teaching the intro to milling machine class at TechShop, I warned the students of the danger in leaving an end mill in the collet, and as I talked, I gestured over at it, neatly slicing the back of my hand, just enuf to draw a bit of blood and a few chuckles. . .
Ha ha I do that so often I keep the plastic caps that come with a lot of dormer end mills and pop them onto the end mill before I go in to do measuring.

chunks of packaging polystyrene is good to pop onto spiky things to help with visibility and also not spiking ones self :)

Stuart
 

gheumann

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#13
Not only have I learned the hard way to remove whatever is in the tail stock (I use end mills in it too, and they're even deadlier) I ALSO remove the tool on the tool post every time when not in use. Took me a long time to learn that.
 

ch2co

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#14
Better question. Is there anybody that hasn't done this? ;)

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Ralphxyz

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#15
While teaching the intro to milling machine class at TechShop, I warned the students of the danger in leaving an end mill in the collet, and as I talked, I gestured over at it, neatly slicing the back of my hand, just enuf to draw a bit of blood and a few chuckles. . .
What I am finally learning is that once you have performed your operation every thing has to be placed somewhere. You use a hammer you set it down (somewhere). The thing to learn is since you have to set it down somewhere set it down in it's place.
Put it back where it belongs!!
 

Norseman C.B.

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#16
Well I can say that I have never done anything like that
in my experience....!!

And if you believe that I've got a bridge in Brooklyn for sale at a smokin good price.....:mooning:
 

T Bredehoft

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#17
I thought of this thread when I was using my turret lathe and encountered a 1/16 drill bit while moving my hand from point a to point b. Gotta be more careful, can't go around removing tools i'm going to use again.
 

davidpbest

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#18
This happened to me on Thursday night about midnight. This was the setup - 3/4” end mill running at 1500 RPM. I had just squared off the end of the small stainless steel part, then loosened the vise, reached around behind the cutter to remove the part (very stupid), and in a flash, my finger was grabbed by the clockwise-rotating end mill which pulled the finger through the 4mm slot between the side of the vise and the cutter.

IMG_6244.jpg

The result is shown below, taken in the ER about an hour later. If you're squimsh, DO NOT click on the photo. I lost a lot of blood and was pretty weak, thankfully my daughter was home and got me to the hospital pronto, not sure how I could have even called 911 alone. The end of my index finger was basically put through a meat grinder, and the last digit bone was crushed into pieces. The fingernail and tissue below it were badly severed and ultimately removed completely in the ER. Joints and tenons appear to be functioning, and nerve damage appears confined to the inner right side of that finger. Not clear what the longer term prognosis is, but I'm expecting the last digit on that finger will have to be amputated.

This was a stupid accident. I was tired, wanted to finish the job and got in a hurry. Lesson learned: turn off the machine before putting your hands anywhere close and if tired or in a hurry, stop and come back tomorrow.

IMG_6526.jpg
 

ch2co

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#19
Thank you. Warnings of this kind are more likely to get it through our collective thick skulls that you need to be cautious.
Here's hoping that you heal well and quickly.
 

markba633csi

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#20
Sorry to hear about your wound David- Working late, tired, in a hurry. Perfect recipe for an accident, whether driving a car or a machine tool.
Mark S.
 

jpfabricator

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#21
Heal quickly. God bless.

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Downunder Bob

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#22
Better question. Is there anybody that hasn't done this? ;)

Grumpy for a reason
Probably not or else the've just started out machining.
 

willthedancer

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#23
David, mend well!

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wawoodman

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#24
Big owie, David! Get better soon!
 
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#25
I guess I am just lucky, as I have not had any issues with items left in the tailstock. I do push the tailstock to the far end of the bed when I am done with it though, something that was taught to me in high school machine shop many years ago.
 

Downunder Bob

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#26
Something I have to be particularly careful with as my lathe is so short only 16" between centers. so even pushing the tailstock to the end doesn't really get it out of harm's way.
 

Analogr

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#27
What I am finally learning is that once you have performed your operation every thing has to be placed somewhere. You use a hammer you set it down (somewhere). The thing to learn is since you have to set it down somewhere set it down in it's place.
Put it back where it belongs!!
I've put many a screw driver, pliers, or wire cutters in my back pocket. It's kinda hard on the ole' seat.
 
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#28
I've put many a screw driver, pliers, or wire cutters in my back pocket. It's kinda hard on the ole' seat.
I did that once (well, more than once) with a wrench while I went in to get a cup of coffee. Came back out and was going to get back to work, but could not find the doggone wrench. Hunted high and low for it, cussed, swore, carried on like a wild man, could not find the wrench.

Finally one of my sons said, "Hey pops, what's that in your back pocket?"

That was about ten years ago, and he still reminds me of it from time to time, the little brat.
 

Groundhog

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#29
I don't care where a cutting tool is hanging out of which machine, some part of my body will find it. So much so that I keep a bottle of skin "super glue" on the top of the tool box.
 
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xman_charl

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#30
getting tired of cuts...
might just wear gloves all the time?

Charl
 
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