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AvgJoe

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#1
There is a family that I attend church with whose 10 year old son asked his father to learn how to weld. His father is a bean counter and didn't have the equipment or knowledge to show his son. His father knew I had a hobby shop and asked if I could help out. When the boy saw all the equipment in my shop, it was literally like a kid in a candy shop. I showed him how to weld that day and told him to come up with another project if he wanted to learn how to use some of the other equipment in my shop.

He decided on a fidget spinner and I had him make a model and drawings in SolidWorks and he's been committing an evening/week to machine it. On his last visit, he inquired how much a mill and lathe would cost. It was terrible to see the disappointment when I told him approximately how much the equipment in my shop cost (as a point of reference). He has 3 sisters and they're a single income family - mom stays home and home-schools them. From his perspective, acquiring a lathe and/or mill would be a daunting task.

I thought if I could find a small lathe (ie: Atlas or Craftsman) and mill (ie: small Clausing or Burke) that were cheap (or free), that this would be a good way to keep him going in the 20180609_200947[1].jpg So if anyone has a lead on the aforementioned equipment (or similar) and would like to help pass our hobby on to the next generation, please let me know.
 

markba633csi

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#2
Looks like me at his age LOL
 

tweinke

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#3
Thank you for spending time with the young man. If he has the aptitude and the will to learn from someone like it appears he does I'm certain he will go far in life.
 

Janderso

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Welcome to the forum Joe.
Good for you to help this fine young inquisitive mind out.
My Grandson is almost 2. When he comes over he wants to go see Papa’s tools.
Since the schools don’t have machine shops any more, it’s up to us to expose these young ones.
 

Dave Paine

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#5
Nice picture.

So good to see a youngster wanting to learn how to make something. So many do not show interest in crafts, woodwork or metal work.
 

ttabbal

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#6
Awesome to see a young person interested enough to try learning about building things. I'm curious to see his design for a fidget spinner, my kids like those things and I think I could cut one on the Bridgeport. Good on you for helping him learn. I'm thrilled that my kids have a little interest and I have been able to teach them the basics of running a lathe. I need to get some more hoods so I can show them welding.

Can't really help on locating equipment, it's difficult to find gear around here and even if I had it, getting it to Florida would be challenging. :)
 

Janderso

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#7
It's funny, all my life I have been interested in tools and what they do. I have also been buying tools my whole life.
When my oldest turned 16, I bought him a Craftsman set of tools and a box. He thought that sucked.
Now, he is an electrician. He loves tools and has been buying them for the past 10 years.
My youngest is a teacher and could care less.
You never know what will influence younger folks.
They do have to have some exposure so the light will come on.
 

benmychree

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#8
Wonderful to see a young person interested in all my favorite things! However he should not be wearing gloves around machinery.
 

Aaron_W

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#9
That is nice of you to help the kid out and introduce him to your shop. So few opportunities these days for kids to be around tools.

As far as equipment you might look at mini-lathes and mini-mills. Not sure where you would find free, but sometimes you can find used 7x12 lathes in good condition for as little as $200-300.
 

AvgJoe

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Thanks for all the replies.

I'll post a picture of his project - he should be done on the mill tonight, but I'm going to have him hand file fillets (it builds character).

Gloves - the latex gloves were to keep his mom happy... along with an in-depth conversation about safety (with a specific conversation on why we don't wear any other type of gloves around moving machinery). See the attached image of the safety rules tag that's on my mill.
 

Attachments

Tozguy

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#11
It seems a bit premature to be setting your protégé up with machines and his own shop. You did say hobby. If you can, why not continue to instruct him on your equipment in your shop. A few years down the line after he gets an education and a job he can set himself up just like we all did. He will appreciate it more that way. If he really has the machining itch it will last forever. All in good time I say but I really should mind my own business, sorry.
 

derf

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#12
Have to agree with Toz. He can learn on your machines, just like we learned on someone elses. I worked on a lot of machines before I actually owned any. But I always had my own toolbox full of the support equipment I needed. You could help him build up a tool collection for his toolbox. Every machinist needs their own measuring tools and layout tools, and especially a handbook. I'm sure there are members here that have extras or duplicates of tools they don't use that would be happy to donate to a young student.
I have a 1" micrometer that I will contribute......tell us where to send it.
 

brino

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#13
Hi AvgJoe,

A couple thoughts.......

First, Welcome to the Hobby-Machinist!

Second, it is great to see you "stepping up" and helping that young guy follow his interests. I hope you do continue this relationship. Once he has a few projects under his belt, he will understand so much more about how the products he sees and uses every day are made, what materials are better than others for a project and why. This really could help him decide what to do in his life.

Third, That's a big rotary table! It must weight more than the kid using it!

Last, I know it's a big commitment for you, but maybe you could find some low cost (or even free) tools because they need some work. We here know the feeling of using a tool you either made or "brought back from the dead". Maybe this guy could learn that sense of accomplishment too.

-brino
 

FarmDad

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#14
Tools given to a boy are soon forgotten . Tools earned and bought are a lifetime treasure . Just some food for thought before you invest much into setting him up .

Edited to add...

Its a great thing to step up and teach a child , however pride of ownership and the desire/ability to stick with something cannot be gifted . That must be earned as they go along the learning process and invest of themselves the amount they are willing.
 

WarrenP

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It's great your helping him with something he is interested it... I have one comment though, shouldnt you teach him NOT to wear gloves when using the lathe/mill etc? Even those that seem to be able to tear off easily really might not one time and it only takes once to have a catastrophy happen. Better to get a little dirty. Good Luck with it all..
 

TonyRV2

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#16
I've got to agree with what a few others have already stated. What you've got yourself here is an apprentice. And one of the early lessons for your young apprentice should be one on how to keep a tidy shop. :)
 

vtcnc

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#17
It's great your helping him with something he is interested it... I have one comment though, shouldnt you teach him NOT to wear gloves when using the lathe/mill etc? Even those that seem to be able to tear off easily really might not one time and it only takes once to have a catastrophy happen. Better to get a little dirty. Good Luck with it all..
+1 on this comment. Saw a pretty good bruise on a machinist hand about two months ago - latex glove started up on a drill press spindle and tore off. Only a split second and he was lucky it broke away.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

Janderso

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I thought about it. I have not taken off my wedding band in over 30 years.
I took it off.
I’m already missing 2 fingers on my left hand. I don’t need to lose any more.
My wife is fine with it.
She did say, if any women make a pass at you, tell them you are spoken for :)
Agreed, no gloves, no jewelry, no long sleeves or loose clothing.
 

vtcnc

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I thought about it. I have not taken off my wedding band in over 30 years.
I took it off.
I’m already missing 2 fingers on my left hand. I don’t need to lose any more.
My wife is fine with it.
She did say, if any women make a pass at you, tell them you are spoken for :)
Agreed, no gloves, no jewelry, no long sleeves or loose clothing.
Jewelry and machinery is a land mine waiting for you to step on it. I was 16 working at a grocery store. The delivery driver for the morning fish order jumped down out of his truck while holding onto the side door rail. Wedding ring skinned his finger clean (well, pretty clean as far as I could tell). Called 911 and sat there with that guy pulling ice out of the fish bins to try and relieve his suffering. No moving parts, no warning signs on the truck...just physics. That was tough to look at.
 

TonyRV2

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From the files of "I was once young and dumb, as opposed to old and dumb"... I was using the bridgeport in our shop to do a government job (a part for my car), and I leaned over to get a good look at what I was doing. Before you could say 'Italian necktie', the end mill grabs ahold of my tie and starts reeling me in. (This is why engineers should stay OUT of the shop...but I did get less ignorant as I'd aged). Fortunately I had the where with all during my panic to reach up and hit the off switch. No problem...I had at least 3 or 4 inches to spare, but the tie was trashed. So suffice it to say, I no longer wear any kind of loose clothing or jewelry of any kind when I'm working in the home shop, and now that I'm retired with my neck intact, I never where neckties except for the very occasional occasion.
 

Tozguy

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We were not allowed to wear neckties, rings or watches when in the plant. Not even the plant manager. Clip on ties and pocket watches were ok.
Long hair (only females wore them long back then) had to be tied up. Heard stories of one who got her scalp ripped off before the rules were enforced. Told my sweetheart that I wore her ring around my heart. Seems to have worked cause we celebrated our 50th last year.

Getting back to your protégé, he is fortunate but so are you. There is nothing quite so rewarding as watching a youngster flourish with our help. God bless the both of you.
 

core-oil

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#22
I wonder if I can add my two pence worth, By the looks of things you have a youngster in your shop who seems to have that something in his being which makes him want to work with his hands, O how I wish the U.K. could get back to the ethos of the 1950/s nowadays we are polluted with bean counters and politicians, & scurvacios bankers, Look where it has got our manufacturing industries , engineering etc, Virtually zilch , Zero Non Existant! Sorry for my rant.
When one comes across a kid who wants to learn, There are many good video,s and You Tube programmes which show how to make things,+ books, But nothing beats the fun of achieving an outcome whem something works, How about showing the youngster how to go about making a simple oscillating cylinder steam engine, These little things are a good base point for basic workshop skills , If he gets a modicum of success , you very well might have lit the fire of a budding engineer, Keep him on a path of workshop hand skills, marking out , sawing to near a line &filing, to size ,This can tie up with a project such as a simple engine
As you build up the kids confidence, with accent on shop safety , you may have the satisfaction of helping him on a happy path through life
 
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#23
I know exactly how you feel for this young man . For three years I apprenticed a young man in small engine repairs and rebuilds . It's the way I could help pay bills fixing and selling. Now back to my buddy , he now is 17 but when he started coming over he was about 12 , he's autistic but so smart just shy and has some light twitches with his eyes. But I'd never say he was autistic if I didn't know. His mom and now x dad came and asked if he could spend time here . What could I say , YUPP no problem three days a week he took motors apart and learned how to rebuild engines from boring and honeing the cylinder to cutting valves and carb settings how to set by ear not just adjustments.
I gave him tools I had doubles and bought things for him too. If his mom or dad had a garage I had planned on giving him a lift table . But he's good still comes by just to see me and very grateful for our times in the shop.
You extend yourself when you teach a child your trade , it's the only real way they understand to learn from there piers and elders. Schools push book learning it's ok but some are smarter then books and loose interest , but give them hands on and brain work the books will then be used.
Thank you for helping this young man your steering his course for awhile till he chooses what to do. Great job.
 
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