• June Project of the Month (Click "x" at right to dismiss)
[4]

The Next Generation

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
Click here to donate to this forum and upgrade your account!

AvgJoe

Swarf
Registered Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2018
Messages
3
Likes
17
2
#1
There is a family that I attend church with whose 10 year old son asked his father to learn how to weld. His father is a bean counter and didn't have the equipment or knowledge to show his son. His father knew I had a hobby shop and asked if I could help out. When the boy saw all the equipment in my shop, it was literally like a kid in a candy shop. I showed him how to weld that day and told him to come up with another project if he wanted to learn how to use some of the other equipment in my shop.

He decided on a fidget spinner and I had him make a model and drawings in SolidWorks and he's been committing an evening/week to machine it. On his last visit, he inquired how much a mill and lathe would cost. It was terrible to see the disappointment when I told him approximately how much the equipment in my shop cost (as a point of reference). He has 3 sisters and they're a single income family - mom stays home and home-schools them. From his perspective, acquiring a lathe and/or mill would be a daunting task.

I thought if I could find a small lathe (ie: Atlas or Craftsman) and mill (ie: small Clausing or Burke) that were cheap (or free), that this would be a good way to keep him going in the 20180609_200947[1].jpg So if anyone has a lead on the aforementioned equipment (or similar) and would like to help pass our hobby on to the next generation, please let me know.
 

tweinke

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 24, 2014
Messages
792
Likes
464
20
#3
Thank you for spending time with the young man. If he has the aptitude and the will to learn from someone like it appears he does I'm certain he will go far in life.
 

Janderso

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
419
Likes
166
15
#4
Welcome to the forum Joe.
Good for you to help this fine young inquisitive mind out.
My Grandson is almost 2. When he comes over he wants to go see Papa’s tools.
Since the schools don’t have machine shops any more, it’s up to us to expose these young ones.
 

Dave Paine

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
May 10, 2014
Messages
719
Likes
508
#5
Nice picture.

So good to see a youngster wanting to learn how to make something. So many do not show interest in crafts, woodwork or metal work.
 

ttabbal

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2017
Messages
447
Likes
458
20
#6
Awesome to see a young person interested enough to try learning about building things. I'm curious to see his design for a fidget spinner, my kids like those things and I think I could cut one on the Bridgeport. Good on you for helping him learn. I'm thrilled that my kids have a little interest and I have been able to teach them the basics of running a lathe. I need to get some more hoods so I can show them welding.

Can't really help on locating equipment, it's difficult to find gear around here and even if I had it, getting it to Florida would be challenging. :)
 

Janderso

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Mar 26, 2018
Messages
419
Likes
166
15
#7
It's funny, all my life I have been interested in tools and what they do. I have also been buying tools my whole life.
When my oldest turned 16, I bought him a Craftsman set of tools and a box. He thought that sucked.
Now, he is an electrician. He loves tools and has been buying them for the past 10 years.
My youngest is a teacher and could care less.
You never know what will influence younger folks.
They do have to have some exposure so the light will come on.
 

Aaron_W

H-M Supporter - Premium Member
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Nov 14, 2016
Messages
280
Likes
315
20
#9
That is nice of you to help the kid out and introduce him to your shop. So few opportunities these days for kids to be around tools.

As far as equipment you might look at mini-lathes and mini-mills. Not sure where you would find free, but sometimes you can find used 7x12 lathes in good condition for as little as $200-300.
 

AvgJoe

Swarf
Registered Member
Joined
Jun 12, 2018
Messages
3
Likes
17
2
#10
Thanks for all the replies.

I'll post a picture of his project - he should be done on the mill tonight, but I'm going to have him hand file fillets (it builds character).

Gloves - the latex gloves were to keep his mom happy... along with an in-depth conversation about safety (with a specific conversation on why we don't wear any other type of gloves around moving machinery). See the attached image of the safety rules tag that's on my mill.
 

Attachments

Tozguy

Active User
H-M Supporter-Premium Member
Joined
Feb 15, 2013
Messages
1,594
Likes
1,036
#11
It seems a bit premature to be setting your protégé up with machines and his own shop. You did say hobby. If you can, why not continue to instruct him on your equipment in your shop. A few years down the line after he gets an education and a job he can set himself up just like we all did. He will appreciate it more that way. If he really has the machining itch it will last forever. All in good time I say but I really should mind my own business, sorry.
 

derf

Active Member
Active Member
Joined
Oct 3, 2015
Messages
516
Likes
559
#12
Have to agree with Toz. He can learn on your machines, just like we learned on someone elses. I worked on a lot of machines before I actually owned any. But I always had my own toolbox full of the support equipment I needed. You could help him build up a tool collection for his toolbox. Every machinist needs their own measuring tools and layout tools, and especially a handbook. I'm sure there are members here that have extras or duplicates of tools they don't use that would be happy to donate to a young student.
I have a 1" micrometer that I will contribute......tell us where to send it.
 

brino

Active User
H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
Joined
Jan 2, 2014
Messages
3,339
Likes
3,336
#13
Hi AvgJoe,

A couple thoughts.......

First, Welcome to the Hobby-Machinist!

Second, it is great to see you "stepping up" and helping that young guy follow his interests. I hope you do continue this relationship. Once he has a few projects under his belt, he will understand so much more about how the products he sees and uses every day are made, what materials are better than others for a project and why. This really could help him decide what to do in his life.

Third, That's a big rotary table! It must weight more than the kid using it!

Last, I know it's a big commitment for you, but maybe you could find some low cost (or even free) tools because they need some work. We here know the feeling of using a tool you either made or "brought back from the dead". Maybe this guy could learn that sense of accomplishment too.

-brino
 

FarmDad

Swarf
Registered Member
Joined
Feb 25, 2014
Messages
25
Likes
24
2
#14
Tools given to a boy are soon forgotten . Tools earned and bought are a lifetime treasure . Just some food for thought before you invest much into setting him up .

Edited to add...

Its a great thing to step up and teach a child , however pride of ownership and the desire/ability to stick with something cannot be gifted . That must be earned as they go along the learning process and invest of themselves the amount they are willing.
 
[6]
[5] [7]
Top