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TIG Surprise!

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Janderso

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#1
Hi,
I have a grand total of 8 hours on a Miller Diversion 180 TIG welder. I have learned that EVERYTHING must be very clean to get good results.
In the process of welding some nuts on to 3/4" ready rod for my Bridgeport leveling project, I had a big surprise.
The threaded rod has a shiny zinc? plating and the nuts have the same type of finish. Having no experience TIG welding this material I just ran the weld area by the wire wheel and went to town.
With in 5 seconds I had a pop and noticed a ball on the end of the Tungsten.
I learned something. Grind down to bare metal.
TIG machines are great, they are versatile and you can do a variety of welding on all kinds of material. MIG on the other hand is a must in a shop. I need a MIG machine.
Please see the PIC.
 

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Ed ke6bnl

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#2
that zinc plating is bad for welding, I have dipped the parts in pool acid to clean (way far from the garage) wash dry and weld.
 

pontiac428

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#3
Zinc coating will certainly contaminate your weld, but the condition of your tungsten looks like you either made contact with the work, or you are set to DCEP (reverse) polarity. You want to be in DCEN (straight) polarity for DC TIG welding. If you think you have the polarity set right, then try a larger gas cup and orifice to improve cooling.
 

Janderso

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#4
I'm all ears. The machine is set to "steel" doesn't that set it to DC automatically? I know aluminum setting is AC. My other welds looked pretty good but I do find the tungsten rounding out fairly fast. If I dip, I know it immediately. These two were not dipped, this is all contamination. New to me.
I do have a small narrow cup with no lens. I am using 3/32 tungsten-gray. I had the amps at 110.
Thank you Mr. Pontiac, I'll get out the manual.
-Argon gas at 25psi
 

DAT510

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#5
In addition to contamination, be careful with welding zinc / galvanized coatings. The out gassing will poison you.
 

pontiac428

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#6
3/32" tungsten should hold up to that level of heat normally. You can run zero to 5/32" of stick out with that electrode, depending on the weld angle. For the project you've described, I'd go tungsten flush with the cup or just slightly proud. You should be able to go for hours on end without sharpening your tungsten unless you "dip" it. Try to grind your tungsten lengthwise with respect to the electrode, it has a notable effect on arc stability. Also, grounding (because someone's gonna say it) and HF start is okay as long as the machine can switch to DC after arc start. Test your settings on some clean mild steel scrap if you can. I think you'll get it shooting straight.

Edit: Gray tungsten (ceriated) should be saved for aluminum. I do all my steel with red (thoriated) tungsten. Affects the arc, mainly, but can make a difference if it's getting tricky.

Gas at 25 psi or cfm? You should be using a flow gauge, not a pressure regulator here.
 
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Cooter Brown

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#7
Zinc fumes will give you metal fume fever, you need to at least wire wheel the zinc coating off before welding with any process.
 

Janderso

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3/32" tungsten should hold up to that level of heat normally. You can run zero to 5/32" of stick out with that electrode, depending on the weld angle. For the project you've described, I'd go tungsten flush with the cup or just slightly proud. You should be able to go for hours on end without sharpening your tungsten unless you "dip" it. Try to grind your tungsten lengthwise with respect to the electrode, it has a notable effect on arc stability. Also, grounding (because someone's gonna say it) and HF start is okay as long as the machine can switch to DC after arc start. Test your settings on some clean mild steel scrap if you can. I think you'll get it shooting straight.

Edit: Gray tungsten (ceriated) should be saved for aluminum. I do all my steel with red (thoriated) tungsten. Affects the arc, mainly, but can make a difference if it's getting tricky.

Gas at 25 psi or cfm? You should be using a flow gauge, not a pressure regulator here.
In response, I find the quality of the tip erodes quickly and that effects the arc quality. gray-oops, I think I knew that. I have blue and red, I'll try it. My stick out is too far!!. That is probably why I am getting so much heat on the tungsten? Cooling gas? I use a pressure reg.
I obviously need some instruction-back to Youtube. Metal tips and tricks, and Old Tony have been my go to for welding with TIG. I better pay better attention.
To buy, Pyrex, clear gas cups, gas lens. I need to see what I am doing. Also a flow gauge.
Thank you.
 

pontiac428

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#9
If your Miller has a Tweco torch, a set of collets, cups, and lenses should be cheap to buy at your local welding supply. Miller brand and off-brand less so, but they're still consumable parts. Flow regulators are available with either a dial gauge or a ball rotameter, and shouldn't break the bank either- but you're definitely going to want to change that equipment out.
 

Janderso

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#10
Whoa, I just watched Jody with metal tips and tricks. His stick out is quite liberal. He was using a flared out short cup with a lens.
He makes it look so easy.
 

Janderso

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#11
I'll take some pics of my equipment tonight.
Jody was using a Furick #12 ceramic . What do you think? Oh, with a gas lens
 

Cooter Brown

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#13
Your argon is set to 33 CFH that is way to high, TIG welding wants an argon flow of about 8-15 CFH. With a high CFH you create air turbulence and pull dirt into the weld area from the room you're in.
 

umahunter

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#14
WARNING !!!!!!!!!!!!! Be careful welding zinc or galvanized parts if you inhale to much you can get metal fume fever the sucky part is it can take hours to show up I made that mistake long ago had to go to the hospital to get injections to relax my stomach contractions I didn't know throwing up that hard was possible I was literally holding my hands over my eyes throwing up cause I thought they were gonna pop out lol to say it sucked was an understatement
 

umahunter

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#15
I'll take some pics of my equipment tonight.
Jody was using a Furick #12 ceramic . What do you think? Oh, with a gas lens
A gas lens distributes the gas better and more evenly so you can have a lil longer stick out if needed you usually want a short stick out buy yourself a Pyrex clear cup gas lens it helps when you're starting to be able to see through the cup
 

Janderso

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#16
Mr. Brown, the regulator pressure increases when the valve is turned off. If I were to torn on the machine, open the valve and tap the pedal, it goes down to 20.
I know this because I noticed the same thing yesterday morning.
I said, wait a tick, that’s too high. :)
Pyrex looks like the way to go.
After watching more videos last night, I have some changes to make.
This weekend.
Jesus, Mr. Umahunter, that sounds like a terrible experience.
 

P. Waller

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#17
Not suprising at all, I do a good deal of TMAW and often end up with a large blob of material on the electrode when I get it to close to the puddle.
I am a terrible welder, but often get through the job. Most of what I do is in the food and Pharma industries.

Machine After Welding takes care of most of this, the parts look unwelded when finished, this is a laborious task with manual machines.
I shall be doing so tomorrow morning and not enjoying it one bit.
 

Ray C

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#18
TIG surprises will also happen when a June bug does a suicide dive-bomb into the bright light... Scared the pants off me! It instantly blew-up with the bang of a firecracker.
 

jbolt

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#19
I've had the zinc blob from not removing enough of the zinc coating and getting the weld into it. I weld outside under a canopy and I have found the stubby gas lens with a 7 or 8 cup handles most of what I need even with a little breeze. With the gas lens I can run the electrode another 1/8" out which is perfect for visibility. Haven't tried a glass cup yet but I would probably break it in no time.
 

Janderso

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#20
The Pyrex cup with the titanium protector sleeve looks like a great idea. The thought of looking through the cup would sure add to visibility. You young fellows with good eyes might not feel the need.
I sure do like the 2X magnifying insert I put into the weld helmet!!
 
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