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[4]

To sleeve, or not to sleeve, that is the question.

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jpfabricator

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#1
The back story.
I have a Francis Reed drill press that I have been tinkering with for a few months now.
The previous owner used a bolt that had been roughly ground down to resemble a MT#2 by hand to hold the chuck in place.
He fought with it, and tried to drive his home made taper into place with a BFH, and he also confessed that it had spun in the socket numerous times.
In frustration he sold it to me.

I pulled the shaft and centered it in the 4 jaw and took a skim cut to clean it up a bit.
I checked the socket with a MT2 drill adapter, and found that the socket is shaped similar to this.
20170310_211522.jpg


The socket is not long enough to re-ream the hole, so a MT2 is out of the equation.
20170310_195409.jpg


I do have a MT3 reamer, but the shaft is not big enough in diameter for a MT3.
20170310_195421.jpg

Could I make a sleeve and silver solder it onto the end of the shaft to add to the diameter?

Should I thread and locktight on a sleeve?

Should I just wheel it out to the curb and tell y'all where it is?(sarcasm!)

What do y'all think?


Sent from my SM-S320VL using Tapatalk
 
Last edited:

Ulma Doctor

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#2
i guess it would depend on your level of dedication to saving the the poor thing.
i suppose you could silver solder a sacrificial plug in and recut the taper into the plug.
but you'd need to be dead nuts to have any hope of concentricity
it can be done if you have the will and the inclination :)
 

markba633csi

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#3
You could epoxy in a new piece that's approximately the right taper and put threads on the end, switch to a threaded chuck. OR (and this is probably what I would do) you could fill the inside with a thick layer of JB weld and then re-bore it to MT2 as best you can, then epoxy the chuck taper in place forever. Done.
Mark S.
ps you could also do a hybrid of the two methods- make your own dual taper shaft after JB welding and boring the inside.
 
Last edited:

ewkearns

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#5
I would probably insert a plug. Freeze the plug and heat the spindle.... Allow the existing metal to drive the drill tang and rely on the repair for location.... only.....

However, faced with the same sort of issue.... a bad rack on a quill, I made a new quill....
 

rgray

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#7
Is there enough material in the shaft to bore it to a straight hole and use a chuck adapter that is straight shank?
Straight shank with flat and set screws.
These were just sitting on my desk begging me to ask.
20170311_152440.jpg
 

DAT510

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#8
A couple thoughts....

Would there be enough length to re-ream to MT2 if you used a "Stubby MT2"?

Or

What about the reverse of ewkerns idea.... "shrink fit" a sleeve over the existing shaft and then ream to 3MT?

Chris
 

jpfabricator

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#9
I'm leaning towards that! I found an axle shaft from a pickup that's begging to be put into service. I also have a big brush pile thats begging to be used to aneal said axle. It's already used to spinning in circles!

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tq60

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#10
Given the taper is a constant rate you should be able to go in and first bore out a bit of the back where the slot is in the bottom then if the major shape is good meaning no high sports to drive the reamer off center ream it lightly until you have enough area to work.

You do not need 100 percent good and can have pits.

It work well enough for now.

Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337Z using Tapatalk
 

RJSakowski

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#11
I would make a stub which approximates the bad taper and weld, braze, or epoxy in place. The stub would have enough material extending past the spindle to turn a male Jacobs taper to fit your chuck. Remove the spindle indicate on a lathe and turn the taper.
 
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