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  • As some of you know, I have wanted to stop managing H-M for some time. It's a tremendous strain on my personal life. I want to set up my own shop. In September, September 15, to be exact, it will be 8 years that Hobby-Machinist has been in existence.

    I have been training VTCNC to run things here. Dabbler is going to learn too. I feel that they are ready to start taking over the operation. I will be here to help in case they need, but I don't think they will. Tony Wells is and will be here also to consult with. I will be doing backups, upgrades, and installing addons. Other than that, I will not be around. I am leaving this place in good operating condition, and financial condition.
    --Nelson
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Tool and cutter grinder build

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mark_f

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I made a little more progress today. I needed a plate 4" diameter and .125" thick. The only thing I had was 5" diameter and .315" thick. It took a lot of turning , but I cut it down to size.

index cover plate.jpg A couple hours in the lathe and I got my plate. After I went to all the trouble to make this plate, (it was in the original design), I discovered I don't really need it, as I changed the design of the tool holder, but am going to use it anyway so my efforts are not wasted. :rofl:
index plate.jpg I also set the index plate up on the rotary table and drilled the indexing holes.

The bearing faces on the tool holder body seem to be a couple thousandths out of being perpendicular to the bore in the body. I am sure there is probably a way to set it up and machine them square, but I can't think of it. So, I guess I will hand scrape them square to have the accuracy of "no" end play in the spindle.

index plate.jpg index cover plate.jpg
 

mark_f

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Today was spent on finishing details. They take a lot of time but must be done as perfect as you can do them to yield the desired accuracy in the end.

boring the spindle.jpg The spindle was chucked up in the 3 jaw chuck for boring. The TIR was .003". To improve this a .002" shim was put under the offending jaw, making the TIR of the spindle under .001". Once dialed in the spindle was bored to 1.251" for the collets and a 10 degree taper cut in the front to an O.D. of 1.485". The nose on the collet was shortened to 1" long prior to boring.


This is a trick I was taught years ago. I keep loose feeler gauge leaves for this purpose. My 3 jaw usually clamps up to .001" to .003" run out. Sometimes by putting a small feeler gauge leaf under a jaw the TIR can be reduced dramatically.



rear of spindle.jpg The finished spindle wall is approx. 1/8" thick.
spindle bored for collet.jpg The front nose has the 10 degree angle for the 5C collet.

I chucked up the tool holder body and spent some time "inspecting" it with a dial indicator. Indicated the bore while in the chuck until it was as close to straight as I felt It would get and skim cut a few thousandths of the front face, turned it around and repeated the process on the other face. This improved the fit, but now I will hand scrape these faces to be as close as possible to parallel.
The spindle still has to be threaded on the rear end and keys added for the index plate and hand wheel. These key ways will be done on the lathe.

boring the spindle.jpg rear of spindle.jpg spindle bored for collet.jpg
 

gmcken

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Thank you for sharing the build with this group. I would like to get a copy of the plans of this machine when finished. You are truly a talented machinist.:talktogod:
 

mark_f

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Thank you for sharing the build with this group. I would like to get a copy of the plans of this machine when finished. You are truly a talented machinist.:talktogod:
No problem.Just remind me as there are too many requests for the plans to remember.
 

NEL957

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Mark
Nice, very nice. It will not be long now.
Looking good
Nelson
 
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mark_f

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Great day today! I am almost done with the tool holder. I am waiting on some material to finish it up.:victory:
toll holdertemp assembled.jpg The tool holder is close to done. I still have to thread the end of the spindle. I gave the body another coat of paint to freshen it up. now that most everything is done.

tool holder temp assembled 3.jpg I cut a slot for the bottom clamp. I will make the clamp bolt tomorrow.

tool holder temp assembled 4.jpg Cut a bar for the mounting to the base unit.

tool holder temp assembled 5.jpg I bored the hole for the split cotter clamp for the spindle.
tool holder temp assembled2.jpg

I still have to engrave the degrees markings on the index dial. I have to do the same on the rotary table base also. I am waiting for a warmer day as the two will take most of the day to do.

I didn't think I was going to like the tool holder.Due to all the changes, I built it kind of "by the seat of my pants" machining, but I am pleased with the outcome now that I see it close to completion. I still have to make the index pin, but it will be made of brass. (gotta have some brass on everything for a little "bling"):rofl:

toll holdertemp assembled.jpg tool holder temp assembled 3.jpg tool holder temp assembled 4.jpg tool holder temp assembled 5.jpg tool holder temp assembled2.jpg
 

mark_f

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Mark
Nice, very nice. It will not be long now.
Looking good
Nelson

Thanks, it is getting there. I am still deciding on a motor. I am also looking at big changes for the wheel head. I am going to "beef" it up some and looking at changing the elevation mechanism to either an acme screw or a ball screw. Cost is not much different, So I am leaning towards the ball screw.:makingdecision:
 

mark_f

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Someone help me understand something. This machine is using mostly split cotters to clamp various parts in place.In the prints , there are small "slots" milled in the back of the split cotters and a set screw with a lock nut screws into the body to locate in the slot. I fail to understand the purpose of this. It can't be to stop rotation as they can't rotate once in place. I have other things with split cotters and they don't do this. To me this seems like "overkill". Is there a purpose?

Opinions wanted......:dunno:
 

cjtoombs

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In my opinion they must be there for assembly. As you state, they can't rotate once the shaft is in place. I've seen this done on other things with split cotters as well. I figure if you can get it together without them, you probably don't need them. If you planned on having it apart a lot, I guess they would probably save some time on assembly.
 

NEL957

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Mark
Do you have a picture of that cotter? I've read different articles and do not remember a set screw on any of them.
Nelson
 

mark_f

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Mark
Do you have a picture of that cotter? I've read different articles and do not remember a set screw on any of them.
Nelson

All the cotters in the Bonelle prints have them, if you have a copy. I have come to the conclusion they are not needed , but if I am wrong, I could always add them.
 

NEL957

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Mark
I'm with you on that, I believe the slit and a pinch bolt would be sufficient. The only problem I see in the slit method is the grit can find a home in there. As a solution one could use RTV or silicon sealer in the color of your machine. When tightened the silicone would collapse and block any dust from entering. When loosened it would relax and look like normal but remaining closed from the dust.
Hope that was some help.
Nelson
 

Randy803

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Really great work and I have enjoyed following this...
 

Jim2

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In my opinion they must be there for assembly. As you state, they can't rotate once the shaft is in place. I've seen this done on other things with split cotters as well. I figure if you can get it together without them, you probably don't need them. If you planned on having it apart a lot, I guess they would probably save some time on assembly.
+1

I made a vise stop as one of my first projects after I bought my mill

Installed.jpg


It locks w/ split cotters, and it's sitting on the shelf most of the time. When it comes time to bring it out, lining up the split cotter to get it mounted on the shaft is kind of a pain! I had not ever heard of using a slot and setscrew as a remedy. I may want to try that! I believe that I've seen someone solder a key in there for the cotter to slide on. A setscrew would be much easier than a soldered key. Still, you'll have to make sure that the cotters line up during assembly anyway. . . .

I guess it's one of those little details that set one tool apart from the others?

Jim
 

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mark_f

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+1

I made a vise stop as one of my first projects after I bought my mill

Installed.jpg


It locks w/ split cotters, and it's sitting on the shelf most of the time. When it comes time to bring it out, lining up the split cotter to get it mounted on the shaft is kind of a pain! I had not ever heard of using a slot and setscrew as a remedy. I may want to try that! I believe that I've seen someone solder a key in there for the cotter to slide on. A setscrew would be much easier than a soldered key. Still, you'll have to make sure that the cotters line up during assembly anyway. . . .

I guess it's one of those little details that set one tool apart from the others?

Jim

This would solve your problem. But in my case, the cotters are always in place.

You mill a small short key way in the rear side of the cotter,and put a set screw with a lock nut in the piece. Adjust the set screw into the slot so it only locates the cotter but lets it move as needed. No more alignment problem.
 

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rwm

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Mark- I may have missed this? What kind of motor are you planning on using for this and where are you sourcing it from? What would be the HP requirement/RPM?
R
 

mark_f

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Sorry,I have been gone for a while. I was down for the better part of a week with the flu and couldn't even get out of bed for several days. It is also too cold to go to the shop. The temperature has been from 10 degrees to -7 degrees. My little heater only keeps the shop about 20 degrees above ambient. I have been working inside for days on drawings. I am also looking for needed material pieces. Looked at Speedy Metals , but way too expensive once shipping is added. I ended up ordering a couple needed pieces from eBay. I have a couple ideas for the motor, but they are really out on the fringe of lunacy, so I will tell you about it if it works. I will get going again when the shop is warm enough to work in.
 

mark_f

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Mark- I may have missed this? What kind of motor are you planning on using for this and where are you sourcing it from? What would be the HP requirement/RPM?
R
The hp requirements are small. 1/6 to 1/4 hp is ample. I would like to have 3450 rpm, but with pulleys other speeds will work. I thought of a way to use a bench grinder motor, but a better idea came up so I am looking into that.
 

mark_f

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I"M BACK !!!!! I borrowed a heater for a few days so I could get some parts made. I wanted to start on the wheel head while I am waiting for material to get here to finish the tool holder. I made two designs for the wheel head. One was aluminum and the other was steel. I couldn't decide which one to use as they are both good. Since aluminum is easier to work with, I tried that first. I squared up a block of aluminum on my mill, then took it to the lathe and bored the hole for the column. My design calls for brass bearings in here , but if it works OK with out them , I'll leave them out. This photo shows using the 4 jaw chuck to bore the block . The hole is offset and not centered in the block.


boring wheel head block.jpg

I accidentally cut the bore .002" oversize. I hope it will still grip with the split cotter. We will see.

boring wheel head block.jpg

wheel head block and split cotter.jpg
I put the block in my drill press and drill the hole for the split cotter. I step drilled until I got a .750" hole That has .125" interference into the bore.

making split cotter.jpg
I made the elevation block from aluminum and the column is steel. I had no brass for the split cotter so I made it from aluminum also. I turned a piece to just slide in the drilled hole and drilled it for the 1/4-20 locking screw, then put it on the mill and used a fly cutter to cut the notch. The cotter was then sawed in half and returned to the lathe where it was counter bored for a spring to go between the two halves.

split cotter pieces.jpg

WP_20150221_18_33_22_Pro.jpg

This is the split cotter assembled with the steel screw and the spring.

wheel head elevation block.jpg
The block is on the column and locked. Is very secure and I can't move it even with a mallet. The spring works just as it should when the cotter is loosened. Since this all worked so well , I guess I will use this design.

I next started on the wheel head arms that hold the spindle. They are made from 1/2" thick x 8" long aluminum bar 2 1/2" wide. They are bolted together so they can be machined as one. They will be mirror images of one another.

boring arms.jpg

I used a fly cutter to bore the holes for the spindle.

wheel head arms bored for spindle.jpg
The holes are bored and the end is split so the screws can draw the opening tight and clamp the spindle. I made a mistake reading my calipers and bored the holes .020" too big. If they won't close on my 2" bar stock for the spindle, I will have to get bigger stock and cut it down to fit. ( I'm glad I didn't make the spindle first.)

My 1/2"-10 acme lead screw came today for the elevation screw. I also ordered a backlash adjustable bronze nut for it . it should be here Monday. The motor should also show up Monday.
 

mattinker

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I"M BACK !!!!!


View attachment 96096

I accidentally cut the bore .002" oversize. I hope it will still grip with the split cotter. We will see.

My experience with split cotters is that they are very forgiving, slight over boring is taken up by the nature of a split cotter! I make the split cotter by boreing with it in situe, the bore and the split cotter have to line up that way!

Regards, Matthew.
 

mark_f

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My cotter worked excellent. Holds the wheel head securely and the spring pushes it apart when the cotter is loosened. I find it easy to make the cotter separately. I measured or calculated the distance of the interference and use an end mill to cut the relief for anything up to 1" in diameter. A lot of folks prefer to clamp the material in to the piece and bore them together. I guess it is preference. If I have several cotters the same size, once the mill is set up , I can just crank them out in no time.
 

mark_f

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Today I got busy on the wheel head assembly. As I am building this part, I realized I way over engineered it. I had it designed with gibs and adjusting screws, complicated gides for the arms and more stuff. After building it I realized, this thing is really sturdy and all that stuff is not needed. This wheel head is a beast, even made from aluminum. The first thing I did today was mill all the slots in the arms that hold the spindle. This required some wierd setting up on my little Burke mill. this photo is the setup for milling the slots in the arms. I made marks on the table for location and start and stop points. This was to make everything exactly alike.

Setup for milling arms.jpg

milling slots.jpg

After milling the slots, all the bolt holes were laid out on the elevation block and drilled and tapped.

Wheel head assembly 5.jpg

Wheel head assembly.jpg Wheel head assembly3.jpg Wheel head assembly2.jpg
These photos are the temporary assembly to check fit. Now they are baking in the kitchen oven after applying the wrinkle finish. I will post pics of the painted assembly later tonight. I will be using all stainless steel bolts as they look so much better.
 

mark_f

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Here are the pics of the wheel head parts with the black wrinkle finish applied.
painted wheel head.jpg painted wheel head6.jpg
 

mark_f

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Ok,,,, I got my motor for the grinder today. It is all set up to use and works fantastic. Runs smooth and quiet. Now I will tell you about it. It was such a crazy idea and I have been ridiculed ( elsewhere on the net) for even suggesting this, but I was fairly sure I could pull it off. The ideal motor for the grinder should have adequate power, 3450 rpm, lots of torque, and be small in size to be light weight. In searching for quite a while I ran onto the solution on eBay. A CHINESE WATER PUMP!! It is small. The housing is aluminum, the end bells are cast iron, it has ball bearings, it is 3450 rpm, it is 1/2 HP, it has copper windings, and it is light weight. Sounds like the perfect motor. Soooo... what is wrong with it you may ask? ..... Well, it has a pump built on to the front end. The end of the motor and pump are cast as one piece. It is NOT reversible and runs the wrong direction. Minor inconveniences, but important ones. It is a good thing I have a lot of experience with rewinding and rebuilding AC and DC motors.
my motor 0.jpg

You can see how small it is for a 1/2HP motor , it is really small as I am holding it in one hand.

my motor 1.jpg
This is the pump and motor. My first order of business is to tear it apart.

my motor 2.jpg
Now out to the shop and cut the pump off in the band saw.
my motor 3.jpg
There, now the front looks like any other electric motor. Firs problem solved.

my motor 4.jpg
These parts are now scrap!

my motor 5.jpg
Next , I lifted the one lead that is common to the run winding and the start winding and cut them apart. You can see the two windings welded to the yellow lead here. I cut the start winding loose and attached it to it's own (white) lead.

my motor 6.jpg

Next, I tied the leads back down with nylon cord and coated them with a half a bottle of clear fingernail polish to secure everything in place. ( LMAO, my wife is still trying to find her fingernail polish).
my motor 7.jpg

Now I have four leads coming out instead of three and the motor is now reversible. I added a start/ stop switch
my motor 8.jpg

The motor is ready to go and it only cost me $30.
my motor 9.jpg
It will get a coat of paint to spiffy it up.
 

mark_f

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Well the motor is painted and ready for the grinder. I gave it a good coat of the black wrinkle finish and put a new junction box on it, with the off-on switch and a forward - reverse switch.
My motor 31.jpg my motor30.jpg

That junction box is 4 1/2" square to give you an idea how small this motor is physically.
 

mark_f

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I got the screw and nut for elevating the wheel head on the grinder
nut and screw.jpg
The screw is an acme 1/2"-10 lead screw. I will have to machine the ends and cut it to length. The nut is brass and adjustable for zero back lash. They were really reasonable. I got them on eBay for about $30 for both.

WP_20150224_18_09_33_Pro.jpg
This is where the nut will mount on the wheel head. If it is warm enough in the shop tomorrow, I will start the needed brackets to mount these.
 

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Awesome work, Mark! That thing is really coming together. I'll bet when people see it they'll be looking for a manufacturer's stamp on it.
 

mark_f

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Awesome work, Mark! That thing is really coming together. I'll bet when people see it they'll be looking for a manufacturer's stamp on it.
Thank you, it is going better than I thought it would.
 

Bill Gruby

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I noticed you left the tilt adjusting screws out? 102_0592 (800 x 531).jpg Was this on purpose or are they not called for. I use them to get that dead on adjustment of the wheel height.
 
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