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[4]

Tool and cutter grinder build

January Project of the Month [3]
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mark_f

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I decided to get busy on the rocker arm today. I wanted to go to a friend's and do it with a boring head, but that didn't work out, so I bored it with a fly cutter and got it to within .001". ( fly cutters make good boring heads, just hard to set.) milling rocker arm.jpg
Once the hole was bored, I started to mill the end for the pinch clamp and slot it also.
cutting out the rocker arm.jpg
I cut t he rough shape out on the band saw and cleaned it up on the mill.
rocker arm ready to paint.jpg
After cleaning up on the mill, drilled a couple holes and masked it to be painted with the wrinkle finish. The next two photos show the rocker arm all finished and installed on the grinder.
rocker arm.jpg roker arm2.jpg
Tomorrow I hope to get started on the micrometer adjustment for the rocker arm. the very last out board hole is for a counter weight. I wanted this brass , but a 2" diameter x 2" long piece of brass is extinct around here, so it will be made of CRS. I am thinking of dressing it up with a couple of bands of knurled finish. We will see how it looks tomorrow. I wanted the micrometer to be brass too, but it is way too expensive as it is 1 1/2" diameter and 1 1/2" long.( plus the largest brass found locally is 3/8" rod and they want $28 for three feet):eek:
 

mark_f

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I started out building a Bonelle grinder with a couple features borrowed from the Quorn.

That said, as I progressed, I have completely abandoned the Bonelle prints and am building what I want in my grinder. As I went along I found short comings in the Bonelle and the Quorn as to features I desired , (so I made changes). There have been many changes, big and small since the start, but I will end up with the machine I want , with all the features I want. I make new prints for my changes so when completed , I will have a complete set of prints to match what I built.

I am also keeping a separate build log with information and all the photos step by step. ( it is up to 41 pages so far). When the grinder is completed, this build article, (if you will), will be converted to a PDF document and made available to anyone that wants it , along with a set of the prints. Just ask when the grinder is complete if you wish to receive them.( If possible to post them on this site, I would rather do that)

Some of the changes made so far include
  • A less complex micrometer setup on the front bar
  • Ball bearings and thrust bearings in the micrometer to reduce friction and make it work smoother.
  • The bed was lengthened from 12" to 20"
  • The column height was increased from 11" to 15"
  • The sliding base and work head was increased slightly in size and made heavier.
  • The rocking arm was increased in size to be a little heavier and sturdier.
  • An adjustable stop will replace the fixed stop the other grinders had to limit the tilt of the work head away from the wheel.
  • The work head is made larger and to use 5C collets.
  • The spindle arms slide in and out to adjust the fore and aft position of the grinding wheel to the front bar ( the other grinders lacked this feature).
  • A simpler acme screw and nut was used for the wheel head elevation mechanism. It is positionable in .001" increments. easier to build , and smoother operating.
  • A larger HP, more powerful high speed motor was acquired at a very low cost ($30 new) , but is still about the size of the popular motor used (at $300 to $500).
  • The spindle inversion feature ( the other grinders had this) will still be possible , but with less tear down of the machine to set it up. ( this is probably rarely used, but I wanted the capability. )

I have some more changes planned but haven't got them built yet.

The spindle is the last major component of this grinder to build. I have all the parts , just have to start it. I have been trying to get a lot of details wrapped up.

Some one asked me what this machine was called ( so, I guess I have to come up with a name for this thing)
 

jeff_g1137

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Hi

Try


The Frazier Expansion

or

Enhancement

Development

Perfection

Correction
 

mark_f

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Today I made the counterweight for the rocking arm. It may be a tad too heavy, but I can saw some off easier than add it back on. I will check it when the whole machine is assembled. It should help balance the weight of the tool holder when rocking it in or out past the wheel. I also made some of the micrometer parts for the rocking arm.
counter weight and micrometer parts.jpg
These are the parts I made today. I'm getting pretty good at putting the graduations on dials. Now if I could get better at stamping the numbers.
micrometer and counterweight installed2.jpg
micrometer and counterweight installed2.jpg
These two photos show the counterweight installed and the micrometer installed. I still have to make the adjustable pin for the micrometer. The distance of the micrometer on the arm is close to the distance of the tool from the front bar so the micrometer readings will be reasonably close to the offset of the tool.

One other thing I did today was put the graduations on the rotary base table. It still needs the numbers stamped, but I was not in the mood to try that today.
table graduations.jpg I marked it every 5 degrees. The 3 inch diameter is too difficult to get 360 marks on as they are so close together, and I probably can't see them that close.
 

f350ca

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A picture is worth a thousand words Mark.
IMG_0331.jpg
The top and bottom dials are at 5 deg. In the space of 5 divisions on the main you divide the vernier into 6. When your on a 5 deg mark two lines of the verier line up, then at 1 deg and so on only one does. I engraved the vernier on either side of the zero mark but one side would work just as well.

Greg
 

mark_f

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A picture is worth a thousand words Mark.
IMG_0331.jpg
The top and bottom dials are at 5 deg. In the space of 5 divisions on the main you divide the vernier into 6. When your on a 5 deg mark two lines of the verier line up, then at 1 deg and so on only one does. I engraved the vernier on either side of the zero mark but one side would work just as well.

Greg
For some reason, I am still lost. I tried this once before and I just can't get my brain to understand it.
 

FOMOGO

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Beautiful work Mark. Just a thought on your dial in brass issue. Could you cut a half round grove in the outside diameter of dial and bend and pin or epoxy a ring of brass rod and then machine it flat for your scale? Mike
 

f350ca

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Takes me a bit of thought to figure them out too, the first one I had to draw on a CAD program so I could rotate the parts. The first picture might add a little confusion as its two dials at 90 deg using one verier.
IMG_0342.jpg
The main dials are at 5 deg increments, as yours are, (but I never got the numbers stamped). The vernier is cut at 4 deg increments, one degree less than the main.
So when your lined up at say zero degrees the centre of the verier is lined up, as we rotate the dial the next line on the vernier lines up at 5-4 or 1 deg, then the next line 10-8 or 2 deg and so on.
Wish i could say I was smart enough to have come up with the idea, but I wasn't, stole it off the dials on the compound and cross feed of the lathe.
Hope that helps Mark.
Your grinder is going to be a work of art, or Mark in this case.

Greg
 

mark_f

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It is starting to sink in. I tried this one time before and it didn't work. I think my mistake was the vernier spacing is different than the dial. I don't think I did that.

So if I have a line every 5 degrees, I want the vernier lines every 4 degrees.? and 5 vernier lines?




Yea, that first picture really messed with me. I didn't understand the 90 degrees and two dials. The larger pic helped with that.

We'll get it hammered into my head eventually. Sometimes i just fail to grasp some things.

Thank you, I appreciate your help.



Takes me a bit of thought to figure them out too, the first one I had to draw on a CAD program so I could rotate the parts. The first picture might add a little confusion as its two dials at 90 deg using one verier.
IMG_0342.jpg
The main dials are at 5 deg increments, as yours are, (but I never got the numbers stamped). The vernier is cut at 4 deg increments, one degree less than the main.
So when your lined up at say zero degrees the centre of the verier is lined up, as we rotate the dial the next line on the vernier lines up at 5-4 or 1 deg, then the next line 10-8 or 2 deg and so on.
Wish i could say I was smart enough to have come up with the idea, but I wasn't, stole it off the dials on the compound and cross feed of the lathe.
Hope that helps Mark.
Your grinder is going to be a work of art, or Mark in this case.

Greg
 

mark_f

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Spindle inversion is an important feature on the grinder. Both the Bonelle and Quorn will do it but it is difficult. On the Quorn, you have to remove the remove the wheel head and turn it over, plus a few more things. On the Bonelle, you have to turn the wheel head over, reverse the motor plate and disassemble the lead screw and relocate it in holes provided in construction. In other words, you have to disassemble and reassemble half the machine. I did not like this idea and there has to be a better way, at least easier.
For those who don't know what I mean by spindle inversion, it is where the column is rotated to locate the spindle perpendicular to the front bar instead of parallel with it. This is handy for some sharpening features.

To accomplish this more easily, I made a plate to bolt to the wheel head where my motor plate had bolted.
Spindle inversion3.jpg
You can see the flat head bolt in the center. This goes through the motor plate and secured with a lock nut set just loose enough to be able to rotate the motor plate.
spindle inversion2.jpg
You will also notice, besides the pivot hole , there are two 1/4-20 threaded holes. One at the top and one at the bottom. these receive the lock bolts to hold the motor plate secure.
spindle inversion.jpg
This setup is the key to simple spindle inversion. To invert the spindle:
1. Rotate the complete column 90 degrees ( or what ever angle is desired in that area). This is done by loosening the clamp bolt at the top of the column and the wheel head clamp bolt.

2. Remove the drive belt and reverse the spindle in the arms.

3. remove the two lock bolts in the top and bottom of the motor plate, ( see photo), rotate the motor 180 degrees and reinstall the two lock bolts.

4. Replace the drive belt and you are ready to go.

This is soooo much simpler and easier than tearing half the machine apart and reassembling it.
 

mark_f

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I also finished the rocking arm micrometer today. here is a photo of the finished micrometer. Each of those divisions is .001"
completed arm micrometer.jpg
 

mark_f

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Getting a little tricky is it Mark? :D

"Billy G"
Haha, not too bad. the part that scares me most is the spindle . I have everything for it, just haven't started it yet. But I am extremely pleased with the project so far. And I have gotten a lot of help from your grinder build thread. I go there often to see " How did Bill do it"
 

mark_f

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I added the support bar for the elevation assembly. This is a 1/2" x 1" x 13 1/2" long steel bar that bolts to the top and bottom lead screw brackets to make them a single unit.
support bar.jpg
 

mark_f

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Thats it Mark.
Glad I can help.
Greg

ok, one more question. Why 5 lines on the vernier? that fifth line lines up with the next 25 degree mark , correct?
 

f350ca

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Thats correct, four lines are all that are needed, I just liked the look of the fifth one.

Greg
 

mark_f

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Finally got around to making the bracket to hold the tool holder on the machine. It feels like a big accomplishment to have it finally mounted.
tool holder mounted.jpg
grinder so far.jpg
now to make the index pin and I still have to key the hand wheel and index wheel to the spindle, I guess that is next. I been waiting to key the spindle and index wheel because when using a square 5C collet to hold lathe tools, you want the index key and the collet key to match up to the "zero" position when the tool is level in the collet. I have also noticed that the square 5C collets are running about $35 apiece. I ain't gonna pay that much. I have figured a way to make the square collets for no cost using some CRS I have in my scrap .... er ...I mean inventory. But first the key ways and index pin.
 

mark_f

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The list of accessories to make for this grinder is growing and the grinder isn't even done yet. I already figured how to make the square collets, I have a print drawn to make the micrometer for setting up to do radius's on cutters, I have another print drawn for pins and locks to quickly and easily set adjustable parts of the grinder to "level" or "zero" quickly and easily., I have another print for a movable/adjustable handle to rotate the front bar and work head when grinding so I don't have to try to hold the big thing with my hands ( it should make grinding much easier), now that I finally understand the swinging head stock linkage, it is a must to build also. I have to find someone with a surface grinder to grind the half set up pins ( I checked a couple local shops and :eek: $$$$$$$ :faint: , so working on that yet). The list keeps growing.
 

wrmiller

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Looking very, very good Mark! Excuse me while I go get a napkin to mop up the drool... :)
 

mark_f

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Looking very, very good Mark! Excuse me while I go get a napkin to mop up the drool... :)

Because it is so cold outside (and 18" of snow), I been building this in my bedroom for weeks. I go to the shop, make some parts, bring them in and put them together. I went to move it yesterday and found I can barely pick it up , it is so heavy. It is gonna take two people to get it out of the house.:frown:
 

wrmiller

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Are you going to shield/protect the vertical leadscrew in some way? I was looking at that in your last pics and started thinking I might position it left of the vertical column or shield it in some fashion. Just being nosy... :)
 

mark_f

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Bill,

It is good you brought that up. I have thought about that for a while. It is on the right to avoid getting in the way of the pulleys and belt. There will be shields around the stone and a hookup for the vacuum cleaner, I doubt it would be essential to shield it , but even the Bonelle did. It would be simple to make a sheet metal shield to cover the two sides towards the wheel. Another thought is rubber bellows. I found a couple sources for them , but they are pricey ( but would look really cool.) I do intend to have a bellows on at least the front of the micrometer bar.

(Nosy can be a good thing.....you never know what I might have forgotten) :grin:
 

wrmiller

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I too like the idea of a bellows on at least the front bar, but when I priced them they gave me pause. Probably will just pony up for it anyway. I like the shield idea for the screw.

Things that make you go hmmm... ;)
 
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