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Tramming a LMS solid column mini mill

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lpeedin

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#1
My LMS solid column mini mill should be delivered on 12/31. I've been trying to do some preparation studying on setup, especially tramming. The only thing I can find deals with tramming the X axis of a non-solid column. Is there any tramming necessary for the solid column & if so, how is it accomplished?

Also, is tramming necessary for the Y axis & if so how is that accomplished?

TIA


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wrmiller

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#2
First off, keep in mind that these mills (I used to own one) will flex several thou just from tool loading. With that said... :)

Because the head doesn't tilt on these models, all tramming of X and Y will have to be done at the column base. There are many ways to measure tram, and once you settle on a method I personally would do X first, then Y. When shimming for X, make sure to use a piece of shim stock that is the same length as the Y dimension of your column flange. This will prevent modifying the Y axis tram while you are adjusting X. When adjusting Y, use a length of shim stock that allows as much interface with the column flange without laying on top of the X axis shims (if any) because if you do, you will have just changed your X axis reference (you may still alter it slightly).

Or you could do like one enterprising person here did and put studs between the base and column and use nuts to adjust tram at each corner. The only downside I can see to this is the reduced interface between the column and base which may reduce what rigidity you start with.
 

petcnc

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#3
Tramming a solid column mini mill

I have a solid column Sieg SX2L mill and I have spent endless hours in tramming using shims and mirrors to read the DTI and when I managed X, Y was out. When I was fixing Y X was out and so on.

PC230306.JPG
My Sieg SX2L mill (similar to LMS HiTorque)

After months of frustration I managed to solve the tramming problem for good by using a different method.

I thought This post was already on the site but for some reason unknown to me it is gone so I re-post it again here:

http://www.hobby-machinist.com/showthread.php/30182-Shim-free-tramming-of-mini-mill

It worked for me as a charm! I never had to retram again.

Petros

PC230306.JPG
 
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lpeedin

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#4
Re: Tramming a solid column mini mill

Thanks for the response that didn't include a jab at the machine. :allgood:

I have a solid column Sieg SX2L mill and I have spent endless hours in tramming using shims and mirrors to read the DTI and when I managed X, Y was out. When I was fixing Y X was out and so on.

View attachment 90830
My Sieg SX2L mill (similar to LMS HiTorque)

After months of frustration I managed to solve the tramming problem for good by using a different method.

I thought This post was already on the site but for some reason unknown to me it is gone so I re-post it again here:

http://www.hobby-machinist.com/showthread.php/30182-Shim-free-tramming-of-mini-mill

It worked for me as a charm! I never had to retram again.

Petros
 

wrmiller

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#5
If you are referring to my post, it wasn't a jab. I had one and liked it very much. It was an FYI intended to temper your expectations a bit.
 

lpeedin

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#6
I have a HF 7x10 lathe, trust me, my expectations don't need anymore tempering :)


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Wireaddict

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#7
I doubt if your Y axis will need to be trammed since it should be milled square with the X axis when built; if not, there's no way to change it that I know of. Regarding tramming, I like Petcnc's post on no-shim tramming even though I haven't tried it yet; I'll do it that way next time. By now you probably have your mill set up & probably know how well trammed it is. My LMS 3960 was a few thou off so I retrammed it & got it to about 0.0005 in. variation from one end of the table to the other.

One thing I've learned about tramming is that you need to measure the center-center distance between the column mounting bolts in both the X & Y directions & affix a DTI to the spindle so it sweeps that distance from one side to the other. Then, using a 1X2X3 block or the like on the table, measure the runout following the same pattern as that of the column mounting bolts. This way the amount of error shown on the DTI is the same as the correction required at the column. [If the table is swept at the far ends of the table the DTI deflection will grossly exceed the actual error & necessary correction & give you fits.]

One final thought: due to the light weight & low mass of these mills I always set the gibs to where the set screws just bottom out then back them off until they just become free [maybe 1/16 turn or less] to help reduce vibration. Do this on the X,Y & Z axis gibs & keep them lubed.
 
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