Universal Work Table Design

kevin

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Recently I acquired a new-to-me Atlas shaper, but it came without a stand. I built a stand for it using a design I have used successfully before, and took the opportunity to build a new stand for my mini-mill at the same time. As I was getting ready to build the second table, I realized that the part dimensions could be easily calculated for any size table, so I created a spreadsheet to do just that. The spreadsheet and other information can be found at the link below:


The tables are built up from standard 2x4s (actually 1-1/2" x 3-1/2") and can easily support hundreds of pounds. I like to add a drawer and lower shelf, but of course these are optional. For the mini-mill table I also added a back panel to help contain chips.

As you can see from the pictures below, I painted one of the tables (primer and two coats of oil-based enamel) and finished the other with several coats of clear gloss polyurethane. I'll see which finish holds up better in actual use.

mill-table.jpg mill-table-2.jpg shaper-table.jpg
 

Flyinfool

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The clear coated one sure looks better.

My guess would be that the urethane will hold up to cutting oils better.

I have also used 2 part automotive clear coat brushed on as a wood finish. It holds up better than any one part coating I have ever found. It is impervious to most chemicals and very tough.
It is the spraying of the 2k clear that destroys lungs by inhaling the mist of actual epoxy that will cure on the inside of you lungs. Brushed is just the fumes of the reducer to deal with you are not inhaling the actual paint.
I use this on stocks for hunting guns and it stands up to all of the cleaners and oils used, it also has no problem with bashing thru thick woods while hunting. They still look like the day I finished them after 10 years of hard hunting.
 

kevin

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I can't decide which I like better - I'll see what they look like in a year or two.

I should also add that this design is not original with me. I found the basic idea on the Internet (where else!?) and adapted it for my use. I'm probably also not the first to work up the calculations for the wood pieces, but I created the spreadsheet from scratch.
 

Nogoingback

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I think the grey looks good: it matches the machine nicely. Hard to say how it will hold up however.

Wooden stands work well for this sort of thing. They can be plenty strong and they absorb vibration well. I built
a stand for my 17" drill press years ago when I bought it. The load is carried by 2 x 6's bolted to upright 4 x 4's, and
plywood used on all sides to prevent racking. It is completely solid, and cost me nothing since it was built from
scrap I had lying around. Not as nice as yours though. It has an oil finish... :)

IMG_0843.jpg
 

DavidR8

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Oct 16, 2019
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Recently I acquired a new-to-me Atlas shaper, but it came without a stand. I built a stand for it using a design I have used successfully before, and took the opportunity to build a new stand for my mini-mill at the same time. As I was getting ready to build the second table, I realized that the part dimensions could be easily calculated for any size table, so I created a spreadsheet to do just that. The spreadsheet and other information can be found at the link below:


The tables are built up from standard 2x4s (actually 1-1/2" x 3-1/2") and can easily support hundreds of pounds. I like to add a drawer and lower shelf, but of course these are optional. For the mini-mill table I also added a back panel to help contain chips.

As you can see from the pictures below, I painted one of the tables (primer and two coats of oil-based enamel) and finished the other with several coats of clear gloss polyurethane. I'll see which finish holds up better in actual use.

View attachment 300401 View attachment 300402 View attachment 300403
Really like your design, thanks!
Timely find for myself as I need to build a table for my drill press.
Because of the top heavy nature of a drill press one concern I have is balance.
I have some window sash weights that I might add to a covered space on the bottom shelf.



Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

kevin

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Jan 3, 2013
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David - hope it works out for you. I usually put heavy accessories like chucks and vises on the lower shelf both for storage and for extra stability.

For something with a high center of gravity like a drill press you might consider either making the table a bit wider than necessary - it's always nice to have a place to put drills and other stuff while you are working. Alternatively, you could add some longer 2x4s across the bottom as sort of "out riggers" (although these can be a trip hazard).
 
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