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Vernon Lathe, From The Farm.

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LsSix

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#1
Brought home my first lathe last week, just putting this thread out there to document the work and hopefully get some friendly advice.

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Heavy duty grinder stand, probably not OSHA approved.

Then I pulled the truck away and...

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Thats how I unload a lathe all by my self. No need to hit the gym that day!

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I was exhausted but I fared better than my assistant did.

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FOMOGO

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#2
Looks like it has a lot in common with this old Sebastian lathe I recently posted about, with the exception of quick change gearbox on yours and the gap bed on mine. Very similar ways and other components. The square headed bolts definitely date it to the same era. Will look forward to watching it come along. Cheers, Mike
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/old-sebastian-lathe.52540/
 

LsSix

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#3
Looks like it has a lot in common with this old Sebastian lathe I recently posted about, with the exception of quick change gearbox on yours and the gap bed on mine. Very similar ways and other components. The square headed bolts definitely date it to the same era. Will look forward to watching it come along. Cheers, Mike
http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/old-sebastian-lathe.52540/
I'll check your thread out as part of the mystery of my machine is that its manufacturer was only around for about 5 years then folded. This makes info and parts hard to come by so if another machine has similarities it may be very helpful to me.

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LsSix

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#4
7b94726fde1b90f4665b32ce1af949a9.jpg
Got some parts bubbling away in the electrolysis bucket.

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FOMOGO

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#5
The bubbling is the easy part. The toil and trouble that Shakespeare alluded to should be along shortly. ;) Mike
 

LsSix

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#6
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Back gear lever is broken and the gears are frozen tight to their shaft, I can pivot it into the cone pulley gears with effort though. Looks like back gear hasnt been used in a long time.

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The carrage gears mostly look good despite being dry as a bone, the exception being the power feed assembly.

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The worm gear part is worn badly, not surprising since it looks to have been run dry. The companion gear (not sure what it is called) is also worn.

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One mystery is the clutch/cone assembly.

This taper pin was almost out when I got the machine, the other must have fallen out some time ago.

But upon inspection I cant figure how it all goes together, if two pins this long go into the cone/clutch they probably go through the C clip shown here. But then in the gear there is a single hole and two shallow recesses. If they go in the recesses they cant seat fully in the cone and there is only the one hole.

Besides that if the pins go through the cone and engage with the gear body at all while it is released the gear will still be driven. Most likely the pin was a poor replacement that doesnt belong at all. Perhaps the pins originally retained the C clip, the clip was off center and slightly wedged against the lip on the cone so that might be it.

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LsSix

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#7
The bubbling is the easy part. The toil and trouble that Shakespeare alluded to should be along shortly. ;) Mike
I hope so, is my first attempt. I think I might just be getting the adapter clean and the corrosion between both parts is keeping the faceplate from being affected, because I'm only seeing bubbles around the shaft.

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LsSix

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#8
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I wonder why the selector lever put up such a fight trying to move through the range.

No pics but the QC gears were about as dry as the apron gears, might be the left hand gear train is all that got lubed semi regularly.

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Small parts after squatting over a bucket of mineral spirits with a toothbrush for far to long, almost didnt get back up!

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LsSix

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#9
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Gotta call shenanigans on this I tried searching for OE style hardware but Im not sure what to call them, diagrams for the operation of lathes call them compound slide locks but google doesnt show me replacements that look like what I need. I know other machines use similar tapered locks so I hope I can get some universal replacements.

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LsSix

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#10
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Used a well ruined holder as the anode and I definitely got some electrochemical activity goin on. 4887a2deb30cb84998bc607fadfce0e7.jpg

Electrolytic bath early this afternoon

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And before shutting it down for the night. Still a long way to go but where the rust was less severe its already down to black.

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LsSix

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#11
One mystery is the clutch/cone assembly.

This taper pin was almost out when I got the machine, the other must have fallen out some time ago.

But upon inspection I cant figure how it all goes together, if two pins this long go into the cone/clutch they probably go through the C clip shown here. But then in the gear there is a single hole and two shallow recesses. If they go in the recesses they cant seat fully in the cone and there is only the one hole.

Besides that if the pins go through the cone and engage with the gear body at all while it is released the gear will still be driven. Most likely the pin was a poor replacement that doesnt belong at all. Perhaps the pins originally retained the C clip, the clip was off center and slightly wedged against the lip on the cone so that might be it.

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So I think I got this figured out. I assumed the gear and the center portion with the two recesses were one piece but they are not.

It seems that the pins index the cone the C clip and the hub all together so that when the knob is turned the threaded shaft pulls the cone into the gear and locks the whole thing together for power feed.

What must have happened is the original pins broke off in the hub, thats why they look like shallow divots. After they broke someone drilled a new single hole in the hub and resorted to the single pin that eventually backed out.

My fix I think will be to match the "new" hole with another one, then open up and tap the holes in the cone for some suitable hex head screws then turn the threads off the end of each so they will screw into the cone securely with their protruding smooth sections engaging the hub as per originally designed.

This seems more practical for me than trying to drill taper pin holes and hoping they stay put this time in the cone that may well have been beat out of round at some point.

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LsSix

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#12
Ok, so upon further examination its obvious the 3rd hole is not an alteration. Its part of the original oiling galley and feeds the clutch its self.

So I'll have to contrive a way to get the broken pins out of their holes so they can be replaced.



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LsSix

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#13
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This plate came out of the bath, still needs a bit of cleaning.

It almost certainly doesnt belong to this machine as I have a 1-1/2" -10 tpi thread and this seems to be 2-1/8"-14tpi.

Im not seeing that measurement come up in searches, is it an uncommon size or is it meant to be used in conjunction with another piece?

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LsSix

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#14

Little video of me messing around with the motor from the lathe. Bearings are probably shot but I cant feel anything crashing inside yet.

I suppose I better just rebuild it, the fabric wrapped wires are bare in spots.

Still runs smoother than some newer motors do out of the box!

Any tips? This'll be my first vintage motor teardown.

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Glenn Brooks

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#15
Interestingly, You can still find fabric wrapped wiring on line, if you wish to retain the vintage build. Several auto restoration web sites sell it by the foot and by the roll. Very interesting the way your shaft clinks around. Definitely something going on inside. Be careful if you do dissemble and clean, the wiring in these old motors can be damaged with modern solvents. I got to aggressive with two old 1920's motors, and made the magic blue smoke come out of both of them just by cleaning them. Nearly Impossible to fix for less than $500 in a shop. On the up side, replacement motors from Grizzly tools are around 100 bucks, although the mounting brackets are different sizes these days...
 

LsSix

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#16
I'll have to look into suitable cleaning solution. I may just blow the dust of the coils and wires and keep the solvents to cleaning up the bells.

The case has a box bolted to it to house the wiring that just needs a cover fabbed up, so the vintage of the wires isnt an issue.

I also want to add a switch in a convenient spot, the PO apparently just plugged it in whenever he had something to turn.

Picked up a chrome 3 position toggle like the one on my drill press and want to work out a handy spot on the front of the machine that wont look to out of place.

Is there any potential issue with reversing the motor on a cone head machine? Its got the reverse lever but a switch may be more handy, and less wear intensive on these gears I wont likely find if I bust one.

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LsSix

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#17
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I need to find a source for some of these screws, I can match the thread and length easy enough but the head is different than typical hardware store machine screws. Smaller in diameter and with a taller possibly tapered head.

I suppose if I had a (working) lathe modifying some generic screws would be childs play lol.

They attach the rack, unlike other racks I see this one runs the screws right through the teeth. Not the brightest solution imo. a7691e241e912ebf79c16e7183fb7b5e.jpg

I may throw some in my small drill press and take a shot at filing them to size.

Oh the irony of having both a project drill press that could use a working lathe to finish and a project lathe that kinda needs a drill press to get done

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LsSix

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#18
4aebc236c823f081102cf2be2dd05a58.jpg

I think outdoor electrolysis season might be over in Nebraska lol.

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LsSix

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#19
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You can see evidence of this machine sitting three decades, the dark line just below the strip of oil here is rust from that bit being exposed and unlubed in the oil slot of the rear cap.

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Some pitting and scoring on the front journal.

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Front and rear cap lightly scored.

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Thrust surface on the front bearing, I think the adjuster on the left side of the spindle was to tight as the spindle spun very nicely once it was off and this surface looks worse than I think it should.

I dont plan on anything other than some steel wool to take down any burs and high spots and to hopefully remove the rust from the rear journal.

Does anyone with experience in these type of bearings think it would be a good thing to extend the channel in the cap so the thrust surface gets direct oiling?

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