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We Have Concrete In The New Shop ...

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FOMOGO

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#1
Pretty exciting stuff for a country boy. Got the first half poured yesterday and the last half well be done tomorrow. Hired out the pour to a friend of mine, but have been doing all the grading, forms, drains and plumbing, and some of the steel and tying. It will be nice to have that finished and get on with the siding and get the doors in. Mike
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Franko

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#2
That's going to be a great shop, Fomogo! Roomy.
 

Sandia

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#3
Looking good Fomogo,

I recall the excitement when I poured the slab for my shop back years ago.
 

firestopper

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#4
Yea! Its like a milestone, congrats Fomogo.
 

Stonebriar

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#5
Oh yes there is nothing like having a new concrete floor. Congratulations
 

brino

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#6
Excellent! That is going to be a fantastic work space. Congratulations!
You should have it closed up long before winter.
Are you going to insulate and heat it?
-brino
 

Silverbullet

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#7
Nice ,more room to work in, my biggest wish . Great looking job congrats.
 

FOMOGO

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Thanks guy's. It's been a long haul, but it's coming together. The other half was poured today and came out pretty nice. Tomorrow I have to saw it for crack prevention and that's a wrap. Mike

You should have it closed up long before winter.
Are you going to insulate and heat it?
-brino[/QUOTE]

Brino, yes, it will be insulated. Fiberglass bats, 6" walls, and 9" in the ceilings. The heat will be propane fired forced air for the main section, with smaller wall units for the machine shop, the office, and the engine assembly room. Mike
 

FOMOGO

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A little more progress. Floor is cut and cleaned up, already dirty and covered with materials and the ever present "stuff".:eek:Built some cedar vents for the attic space, put in a bunch of nailer's for sheet rock and around 2000 lf of furring strips to bring the stud surfaces even with the 6x6 posts. Got one of the garage doors in and powered up, and five of the fourteen t5 light fixtures hung for temp work light. Pretty bright considering there aren't really any reflective surfaces yet. Still a long ways to go, but moving forward. Mike
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Silverbullet

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#11
Livin the dream , wow that's gona be very nice for your shop. Good luck with all the work your doing it's realign looking great. Till I saw the picture with the concrete truck inside I didn't realize how big it is. I worked in machine shops where we had to build little houses on the roof to fit our boring mill and it only had a 48" table , I think it built the titanic it had overhead flat belt drive. What a trip for me back then to learn on one so old. Keep the pics coming ,I bet your anxious to get to where you can get set up and start using all your equipment.
 

kvt

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#12
that is looking like a dream to me, I do not have that much space to do something like that.
 

FOMOGO

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Livin the dream , wow that's gona be very nice for your shop. Good luck with all the work your doing it's realign looking great. Till I saw the picture with the concrete truck inside I didn't realize how big it is. I worked in machine shops where we had to build little houses on the roof to fit our boring mill and it only had a 48" table , I think it built the titanic it had overhead flat belt drive. What a trip for me back then to learn on one so old. Keep the pics coming ,I bet your anxious to get to where you can get set up and start using all your equipment.
Thanks guys, and yes I am looking forward to it being done and set up, but for awhile I need to try and stay focused and get it finished. At my age I'm still doing what I did 20 yrs ago, but the body is paying a somewhat high price. Cheers, Mike
 

Kiwi

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#14
Strange way of doing it ! Out here we dig and pour the foundation and steel around the perimeter then lay the concrete floor over the foundation then damp proof course and timber on top don't need to take the concrete truck inside the builders have a good surface to work on laying out the walls before standing them up I notice you don't use nogs/dwangs in your building just those big sheets of particle board very interesting
 

uncle harry

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Strange way of doing it ! Out here we dig and pour the foundation and steel around the perimeter then lay the concrete floor over the foundation then damp proof course and timber on top don't need to take the concrete truck inside the builders have a good surface to work on laying out the walls before standing them up I notice you don't use nogs/dwangs in your building just those big sheets of particle board very interesting
O.K., What are nogs/dwangs ?
 

FOMOGO

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#16
Yes, that is one common construction method used here also, but the original half of the building was built using 6x6 posts set 4' in the ground as at the time there was no money for a concrete floor and the building was just used for storage. I might have been able to get away with slab on grade (our name for your method) as I graded everything around the building to drain away from it, but the ground it's situated on is expansive clay and I didn't want any issues with the building moving and cracking sheetrock etc.. Also standing sheathed 15' walls of any length is a whole different ballgame than standing a standard 8' wall. I generally work alone or with one other person at most so it just seemed safer to do it as I did. If the whole thing had been a clean sheet build I would have probably gone another route. For a more comprehensive look at the build you can check it out here. I haven't updated it to the point I was at before I left for the winter yet, but it will give you a better feel for the details. I would also be interested in a description of nogs/dwangs. Cheers, Mike
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1953mercury
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FOMOGO

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#18
Thanks for clearing that up for me. There is one row of blocking half way up the perimeter walls. No permit on this one but anything over 8' requires what is termed fire blocking. Floor joists are blocked for rigidity also. Hope to get over to Australia/New Zealand in the next few years. Always interesting to see how things are done in different parts of the world. Cheers, Mike
 

chips&more

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Thanks for clearing that up for me. There is one row of blocking half way up the perimeter walls. No permit on this one but anything over 8' requires what is termed fire blocking. Floor joists are blocked for rigidity also. Hope to get over to Australia/New Zealand in the next few years. Always interesting to see how things are done in different parts of the world. Cheers, Mike
Blocking, smlocking…that’s one sweet space/shop. Hope it ALL works out for you. Any interest in putting solar panels on that roof?...Dave.
 

FOMOGO

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#20
Finally back to work on the new shop. Took a bad fall in early April which wasn't properly diagnosed until a few weeks ago(was out of the country until April 20th). Cracked rib and a 60% compression fracture on t-7. They put me in a thoracic back/neck brace two weeks ago, five wks to go, then pt, and a less restrictive brace for a while until I have my posture where I want it. Not much fun, but it could have been much worse, and I'm very grateful to be upright and breathing. A little observation here, If that ladder doesn't look right, stop and change it, and be especially careful working on someone Else's site, with there equipment. Don't be afraid to hurt someones feelings, or be in such a rush, that you forgo basic safety. I don't blame anyone else for my misfortune, because in the end we are always totally responsible for are own actions. This will be my wake up call to be ever vigilante in regards to safety issues, and hopefully my poor example may save someone else a bunch of pain and frustration. So to rap up this little segment, Please, be careful out there.
Started back to work two weeks ago with a helper doing most of the heavy lifting and climbing. Thirty years ago when I put up the first half of this building money and time were in short supply so the cedar siding went up right over the studs and posts. Now that the space will be heated it's time for some improvements. We covered any spots where light was coming through with snow & ice shield, and then covered that with 15# felt, followed by 1/2" OSB ripped to fit between the 2x6 studs, and held in place with 3/4" strips of OSB. All of the studs had to be furred out 1/2" to be flush with thew 6x6 posts for sheetrock, so I still have a marginal 5 1/2" space for my R-19 batts. Did about 100 l.f. of that operation and then moved on to removing 30yrs of accumulated building materials and miscellany that had been stored overhead in the trusses. Hired an additional helper for that as I'm not supposed to lift anything over 10#. Pretty amazing how much pack rat sh*t and nest material came down with it. Relocated about half of this stuff to a 14' box van I picked up for just this purpose. The other half will be utilized in the building. Should be updating this again on a regular basis, and hopefully barring any major disasters, finishing up and moving everything from the old shop to the new this fall. Cheers, Mike
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Grumpy Gator

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#21
Damn Mike,
That brace looks like a pain in the a......neck.
The shop is coming along nice.
Take it slow and heal Brother.
*G*
 

firestopper

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#22
Damn brother, your lucky to be recovering from that fall. Glad to see your on the mend, your shop is looking awesome too. Don't push it man, it takes longer to fully recover at our age and you'll get her done before you know it. Keep us posted amigo!

Paco
 

uncle harry

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#23
Finally back to work on the new shop. Took a bad fall in early April which wasn't properly diagnosed until a few weeks ago(was out of the country until April 20th). Cracked rib and a 60% compression fracture on t-7. They put me in a thoracic back/neck brace two weeks ago, five wks to go, then pt, and a less restrictive brace for a while until I have my posture where I want it. Not much fun, but it could have been much worse, and I'm very grateful to be upright and breathing. A little observation here, If that ladder doesn't look right, stop and change it, and be especially careful working on someone Else's site, with there equipment. Don't be afraid to hurt someones feelings, or be in such a rush, that you forgo basic safety. I don't blame anyone else for my misfortune, because in the end we are always totally responsible for are own actions. This will be my wake up call to be ever vigilante in regards to safety issues, and hopefully my poor example may save someone else a bunch of pain and frustration. So to rap up this little segment, Please, be careful out there.
Started back to work two weeks ago with a helper doing most of the heavy lifting and climbing. Thirty years ago when I put up the first half of this building money and time were in short supply so the cedar siding went up right over the studs and posts. Now that the space will be heated it's time for some improvements. We covered any spots where light was coming through with snow & ice shield, and then covered that with 15# felt, followed by 1/2" OSB ripped to fit between the 2x6 studs, and held in place with 3/4" strips of OSB. All of the studs had to be furred out 1/2" to be flush with thew 6x6 posts for sheetrock, so I still have a marginal 5 1/2" space for my R-19 batts. Did about 100 l.f. of that operation and then moved on to removing 30yrs of accumulated building materials and miscellany that had been stored overhead in the trusses. Hired an additional helper for that as I'm not supposed to lift anything over 10#. Pretty amazing how much pack rat sh*t and nest material came down with it. Relocated about half of this stuff to a 14' box van I picked up for just this purpose. The other half will be utilized in the building. Should be updating this again on a regular basis, and hopefully barring any major disasters, finishing up and moving everything from the old shop to the new this fall. Cheers, Mike
P1000818_zpsudv7wuwc.jpg
P1000814_zpscvajzzhn.jpg
P1000813_zpsvbpdhiob.jpg
P1000815_zpsl96to1ax.jpg
Hey Mike, I was thinking about you and your somewhat recent fall enough to check out your well being. I was distracted from that last week Wed. when I took a fall at the GF's house and dislocated my right shoulder. I'm out for 6 weeks now during prime painting season. Drat poo and other words on that move. Your shop is coming along well. Good luck on your back issues.
 

FOMOGO

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#25
Thanks for the support guys. Will definitely be moving a little slower for a while, but not very good at sitting still. Will be sticking to light duty chores, and maybe get a little repair work in on the lathe and mill. Harry, I may be up your way in a few weeks, will let you know. Hope you heal up quick. Every one have a great weekend, and thanks to all are vets. I believe it's time for a cocktail. Mike
 

f350ca

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#26
Good that your on the mend Mike, god that thing looks uncomfortable, but better than the alternative.
Looks like you'll have a nice shop when the dust settles. I've done it but hate reworking a building, seams so much quicker to start with a match.
 

kvt

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#27
Mike Those things are a real pain aren't they. Once you finally get out of it still take it easy for a while, Do not push it That can cause other problems you do not want. Good luck on the shop, It is looking nice. Again take care, Are they letting you drive yet, It took about 4 weeks before they officially said I could drive.
 

FOMOGO

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#28
Looks like you'll have a nice shop when the dust settles. I've done it but hate reworking a building, seams so much quicker to start with a match.
Remodeling is certainly more work, but I've done a lot of it, and it offers it's own unique challenges. This one is kind of like an old, somewhat invalid friend from my past (seems fitting somehow). Half of it is new, so a little of both worlds.

Are they letting you drive yet, It took about 4 weeks before they officially said I could drive.
Yes, I've driven several times with it on. We live pretty far out in the boonies and my wife is working out of town for a few weeks, so I pretty much have to drive. If I go to town, I just take it off, as there is just to much going on to be that vision limited. When it's mostly highway it's not so bad, and you really learn to use your mirrors, and wait for big gaps in traffic before pulling out. My Harley sits in the garage taunting me, and I fired it up the other day just to listen to it. I'm thinking maybe by the end of July I can get in a few short rides, but we'll see what the witch doctor says. Mike
 

Stan the Man

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#29
Hey Mike,
Stan in Orlando, Enjoyed seeing your shop pictures, and sorry to hear of your accident. I climbed ladder's as a firefighter for over 30 years never had an accident thank God. Your correct about checking your own equipment and not worrying about hurting others feelings. We are ultimately responsible for our actions, to bad so many people in this world do not understand that and are far to quick to point the finger at others.

I have a small 500 square foot shop coming soon in the back yard, it will have a poured slab then will be erected over that. Its a metal building basically a car port with enclosed sides. It will also be insulated and A/c for the 90+ Florida summer days. I am starting to get that excitement as we begin to prepare and get things ready for the build.

I hope you are mending quickly and are able to get back to normal soon, I myself am recovering from a double foot fracture from last Thanksgiving and am just now able to walk with the help of only one crutch. I feel some of your pain and frustration.
Good luck brother and much luck with the shop.
Stan.
 
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