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What Did You Buy Today?

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darkzero

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Oh, no, no, no ... don't you worry about me, Will. I'm happy for you and will wait to see what those cut knurlers can do.

Actually, I'm jealous but my home improvement projects just grew from 60K to over 100K, and that's just this year. I'm on tool buying hold right now.
Mike, I suppose really I should be the one that is jealous. Sorry to hear that it's going to cost more money but it should be well worth it. I wish I had more room & a nice shop space!
 

mikey

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Mike, I suppose really I should be the one that is jealous. Sorry to hear that it's going to cost more money but it should be well worth it. I wish I had more room & a nice shop space!
Yeah, worth it. I'll have more space and I'm going to air condition my shop and put in a PV battery system to get completely off the grid. Should be worth the cost but the very next tool I buy will be an Eagle Rock knurler. Keep us posted on that cut knurler, okay?
 

ACHiPo

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Four caster/leveling feet for lathe bench showed up today. Not sure if these are made by CarryMaster, but they certainly look like them, and they seem very solid. I'm impressed.
IMG_0014.JPG
 

roadie33

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That Eagle Rock knurling tool looks good, but they must be proud of the price as they don't even list it on the web site.
 

darkzero

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Yeah, they are very proud of them but most high quality knurling tools are not cheap. They don't sell direct so like most other manufacturers they don't list the price. I was very very lucky getting mine.

Those leveling casters look like Foot Masters. I never heard of Carry Master but they sure do look the same also.
 

mikey

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Yeah, they are very proud of them but most high quality knurling tools are not cheap. They don't sell direct so like most other manufacturers they don't list the price. I was very very lucky getting mine.

Those leveling casters look like Foot Masters. I never heard of Carry Master but they sure do look the same also.
I think those Wood River casters are Chinese knock offs of the Korean Foot Master and Carrymaster casters. The Korean ones are very good. I have no experience with the Wood River ones ...
 

ACHiPo

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I think those Wood River casters are Chinese knock offs of the Korean Foot Master and Carrymaster casters. The Korean ones are very good. I have no experience with the Wood River ones ...
Mike,
The Wood River casters are indeed made in China. I don't know where the Carrymaster (Zambus) casters are made. From what I can tell the Carrymaster casters would be about $200/set with 1300 lb capacity. I found several places that sell Carrymaster, but didn't want to hassle with calling and ordering (couldn't find any online stores that carried them). I've seen the Foot Master casters, but the only ones I could find were either too small capacity (480 lbs with 4) or as expensive as the Carrymasters ($240/4 with 2400 lb rating).

The Wood River casters seem pretty high quality, and were the lowest priced caster of that type I could find. Of course 2 days after I placed the order from Woodcraft I see two other Amazon sites with the same caster set for $30 less.:mad:
Evan
 

Alan H

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That Eagle Rock knurling tool looks good, but they must be proud of the price as they don't even list it on the web site.
They do not sell direct. I called them and talked to them about their offerings and which model to get for a manual lathe.

I found them to be easy to talk to and straightforward. They also told me that they were out of stock and behind so there must be a demand for them. I bought mine from Ajax and had to wait on it even though it said it was in stock when I ordered it.

You are right, they are anything but cheap but it should last two lifetimes, mine and my son's who will inherit it. It is a brute of a tool. This new version allows for the knurls to be changed easier. Eagle Rock told me that they are likely dropping the earlier versions and moving to this one.
 

mikey

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Mike,
The Wood River casters are indeed made in China. I don't know where the Carrymaster (Zambus) casters are made. From what I can tell the Carrymaster casters would be about $200/set with 1300 lb capacity. I found several places that sell Carrymaster, but didn't want to hassle with calling and ordering (couldn't find any online stores that carried them). I've seen the Foot Master casters, but the only ones I could find were either too small capacity (480 lbs with 4) or as expensive as the Carrymasters ($240/4 with 2400 lb rating).

The Wood River casters seem pretty high quality, and were the lowest priced caster of that type I could find. Of course 2 days after I placed the order from Woodcraft I see two other Amazon sites with the same caster set for $30 less.:mad:
Evan
Carrymaster and Foot Master casters are both made in Korea. Both are good but I prefer the Carrymaster brand. I had Footmasters under my mill and didn't like the screws for the levelers - seemed flimsy for the rating. I took them off and installed Carrymasters and they are stout for their rating. I can push an 800# machine around my shop with one finger and then ground and level it in a few minutes. The leveling feature is solid, unlike the Foot Masters, and it doesn't change over time so I'm going with Carrymaster from now on.

I actually switched the Foot Masters to go under my lathe but I just don't care for the feel or solidity of the leveling feet so they're being replaced with Carrymaster AC-600's. The AC-600's weigh about 3# apiece and they are massive. I chose them because I don't want flex or movement under a lathe and I know the AC-600's are stout; I have two of them now and am waiting for a better price on the other two (got my two from Amazon for $20.00 each, shipped!)

I saw the Wood River casters and suspect they will be fine provided the rating is at least double the weight of the machine. You sure cannot beat the cost. I didn't go for them because I didn't want to chance a mishap or breakage with a heavy machine sitting on them but I admit that I'm probably being overly cautious about that. The wood shop guys seemed to think well of them.
 

mikey

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You are right, they are anything but cheap but it should last two lifetimes, mine and my son's who will inherit it. It is a brute of a tool. This new version allows for the knurls to be changed easier. Eagle Rock told me that they are likely dropping the earlier versions and moving to this one.
Boy, that @darkzero should get a commission on these knurlers. There is absolutely nothing wrong with my shop-made knurler - produces crisp, clean knurls with no issues at all - but even I'm going to buy an Eagle Rock knurler so I can knurl stainless like a big boy.

All joking aside, rigidity is the single most important feature for a knurling tool, IMO. Hardened frame, carbide pins, good fits on the hinge with a hardened stud - all of it matters when you have to knurl something that allows only one pass and Eagle Rock knurlers have the right stuff. They are expensive for a tool that most of us will use only sporadically but from what I've seen and heard, it is the best of its kind.
 

Silverbullet

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Cardinal green 3 B speed vise , don't see any digits or dings . It looks like brand new , not sure there value but I liked the condition . It just said make an offer so I did . That and some acorn dies and a holder #2 acorn die holder . I've been trying to stay away from the machinist tools , I own to many now.
 

ACHiPo

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Carrymaster and Foot Master casters are both made in Korea. Both are good but I prefer the Carrymaster brand. I had Footmasters under my mill and didn't like the screws for the levelers - seemed flimsy for the rating. I took them off and installed Carrymasters and they are stout for their rating. I can push an 800# machine around my shop with one finger and then ground and level it in a few minutes. The leveling feature is solid, unlike the Foot Masters, and it doesn't change over time so I'm going with Carrymaster from now on.

I actually switched the Foot Masters to go under my lathe but I just don't care for the feel or solidity of the leveling feet so they're being replaced with Carrymaster AC-600's. The AC-600's weigh about 3# apiece and they are massive. I chose them because I don't want flex or movement under a lathe and I know the AC-600's are stout; I have two of them now and am waiting for a better price on the other two (got my two from Amazon for $20.00 each, shipped!)

I saw the Wood River casters and suspect they will be fine provided the rating is at least double the weight of the machine. You sure cannot beat the cost. I didn't go for them because I didn't want to chance a mishap or breakage with a heavy machine sitting on them but I admit that I'm probably being overly cautious about that. The wood shop guys seemed to think well of them.
The casters I got are rated for 1300lb and the lathe and bench weighs about 700lbs so hopefully I'll be ok.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
 
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pstemari

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Now have an Eagle Rock knurling set-up.
View attachment 231621
Fair warning: the standard knurls on that are tpi knurls, not diameteral pitch knurls, and are a royal pita to change. Be sure to measure the pitch before knurling and work out the appropriate workpiece diameter.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
 

Alan H

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Fair warning: the standard knurls on that are tpi knurls, not diameteral pitch knurls, and are a royal pita to change. Be sure to measure the pitch before knurling and work out the appropriate workpiece diameter.

Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
I'll have to study that a bit. I was lazy and didn't cipher anything on this one other than putting it on the machine and giving it a light knurl. Guess I was lucky coming out of the box. (BTW, there was an interesting thread here on the board on this topic a couple of weeks ago.)

In terms of being hard to change, not sure what you mean. That was one of the primary reasons I bought the K1 model . The shafts are not pressed in but are held in place with set screws so changing the knurls is easy.
lock.jpg
 
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Rustrp

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I absolutely hate thread wires; I always drop them in the chip pan or on the floor ... always!
So playdough was never high on your entertainment list. The wires do require a a third hand if you even want to come close to looking like you know what the word accuracy means.
 

darkzero

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The standard K1-201 have pressed in pins. The heavy duty K1-44 like the one Alan & I have the pins are held in with set screws.

Good lucky trying to press in carbide pins on the K1-201, I've seen it done but you have to have really good patience.
 

darkzero

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Boy, that @darkzero should get a commission on these knurlers. There is absolutely nothing wrong with my shop-made knurler - produces crisp, clean knurls with no issues at all - but even I'm going to buy an Eagle Rock knurler so I can knurl stainless like a big boy.

All joking aside, rigidity is the single most important feature for a knurling tool, IMO. Hardened frame, carbide pins, good fits on the hinge with a hardened stud - all of it matters when you have to knurl something that allows only one pass and Eagle Rock knurlers have the right stuff. They are expensive for a tool that most of us will use only sporadically but from what I've seen and heard, it is the best of its kind.
I know right! ;)

Always happy to help people spend their money!

The Eaglecraft HD K1-44 is probably the best form scissor knurl on the market. Expensive but still worth it IMO as everything on it is beefed up. Scored mine practically new for only $80 years ago so I'm a very happy guy, I miss those days on ebay. If there's a better one out there I would like to know. Not to buy, just to know.
 

mikey

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So playdough was never high on your entertainment list. The wires do require a a third hand if you even want to come close to looking like you know what the word accuracy means.
Yeah, I know three wires are more accurate but when you are sneaking up on a class 3 fit, you can check tolerances 5-6 times or more. I've tried tape, I've tried modeling clay, and I've even tried holes in delrin to hold those stupid wires. Thing is, I thread different threads and diameter all the time and it is so much hassle to fuss with those wires and I meant what I said; I drop them all the time. Now I don't need to; a Tesa thread micrometer is a jewel to use. I haven't compared them to a three wire reading yet but I cut a 1/2-20 class 3 thread on a 1144 stressproof stud - running fit with zero play.

No, you can go play with your dough. I'll settle for my Tesa ... but I'll be smiling! :)
 

darkzero

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I haven't done it myself yet as I don't own a set of thread wires yet (on my list & I have a thread mic) but a few dabs of thick grease will hold the wires nicely.
 

mikey

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I haven't done it myself yet as I don't own a set of thread wires yet (on my list & I have a thread mic) but a few dabs of thick grease will hold the wires nicely.
Depending on the source, the three wire technique is supposed to be more accurate. It is certainly the standard vs a thread mic but the sheer ease with which a mic allows you to work is worth a little less accuracy. I'm going to check mine the next chance I get, just to see if its a real concern. Personally, I've wanted a Tesa thread mic for years and years; I'm just stoked to have a set.
 

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Went to Tractor supply last night, I needed a new tire for my tractor.. (didnt get one).
But I picked up one of these for 9.99..
https://www.tractorsupply.com/tsc/product/barn-star-16-in-f-bar-clamp?cm_vc=-10005
While I haven't used it for real work, they seem to be ok, especially for the price. not copper clad so you couldn't safely weld with it.
The black oxide is still okay to weld with and neither will take a direct hit from the arc but spatter wipes/brushes off of either. The down side of the copper clad is they bind up with heavy clamping. I have two of each style (heavy duty) and I wouldn't buy copper again.
 

aliva

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Bought a new parting blade kit with 2 blades, 10 inserts, wrenches and case, from Accusize Tools decent price $ 176.00 Cdn. and works extremely well No problem parting at 200 rpm with cross slide under power. Also ordered 10 extra .120 inserts at $5.50 each
2015121611184816368.jpg
 

gzoerner

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After watching recommendations about which edition of the Machinery's Handbook to purchase, I bought Edition 25 (1996). I ordered it from Alibris and paid $35. It arrived in 5 days and is in "like new" condition.

Many thanks to all of you for pointing me in the right direction. I learned that I don't need the latest edition.

I'm learning a lot from the discussions on this site. You guys are terrific.
 
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