What is it?

boneyard51

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 30, 2019
Messages
71
Can anyone guess the model of mill? I only know that it is an” Index” I have compared to pics in this site, but can’t seem to come up with one that looks similar. Is it a good mill? Thanks in advance.



Bones 4023F87D-1F73-4455-908B-6393C8D534C7.jpeg
 

boneyard51

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 30, 2019
Messages
71
Have you look at vintagemachinery.org? Either their publication reprints and/or photo index.
http://vintagemachinery.org/mfgindex/detail.aspx?id=2280&tab=4
If the price is right , it's a good machine :)
Thanks, for the heads up on the images, I new here and still stumbling around! I was looking on this thread for various pictures. I looks like it may be a 645.

I got about $350 in it, but it’s a B&S 9 taper, considering having it converted to R-8, but don’t know how much it cost. I’ve heard that the original company will do it, but not for sure.




Bones
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
7,208
considering having it converted to R-8, but don’t know how much it cost. I’ve heard that the original company will do it, but not for sure.
Index does that work, but you must send the spindle and quill to them, assembled, When they grind it to R8, you will not get full contact between spindle and collet. The price is not cheap, and there is freight both ways. Buy a few B&S #9 collets (3/8, 1/2, 5/8, and 3/4") and then use straight shank tooling in the collets. That is a good system, without any modifications needed.
 

HarryJM

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 16, 2015
Messages
188
Join owwm.org and post as question under their "Old Metalworking Machines" forum and maybe someone there might be able to help you.
 

boneyard51

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 30, 2019
Messages
71
Index does that work, but you must send the spindle and quill to them, assembled, When they grind it to R8, you will not get full contact between spindle and collet. The price is not cheap, and there is freight both ways. Buy a few B&S #9 collets (3/8, 1/2, 5/8, and 3/4") and then use straight shank tooling in the collets. That is a good system, without any modifications needed.
Join owwm.org and post as question under their "Old Metalworking Machines" forum and maybe someone there might be able to help you.
I was afraid of that. I have a set of B&S#9 collets. Guess I may just stick with them.


I’m a member at OWWM, but feel like a stranger over there, they seem to be mostly wood working group.




Bones
 

boneyard51

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 30, 2019
Messages
71
Bob, you were right! They will do it, but before it’s all done it will be close to a thousand dollars! Guess I stick with my B&S#9 collets, convenienty is not worth a grand!




Bones
 

Latinrascalrg1

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
1,130
FYI- From my research the biggest problem with the b&s#9 taper is the potential for getting stuck.......The most recommended way to prevent this is to be very conscious of the cleanliness of the taper mating surface, apply oil and wipe "dry" leaving behind a very thin layer and finally what seems to be the most important thing to do is to Loosen the Taper immediately while the spindle is still warm anytime you do not intend to use again before the spindle can cool down.

Note: None of what I stated is from personal experience, it is simply a summary of the advice given that I've come across concerning a B&S #9 taper.
 

boneyard51

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 30, 2019
Messages
71
Well, I got to the shop today, it’s a 55 series serial number 6572. Can anyone tell me what year it was made?
Thanks Rascal, I’m sure the collets that are in there will be stuck! But I’m an old pro at getting things unstuck! Wish me luck!
Might need some parts when I fire it up.... wonder if anyone has a parts machine?


Bones
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
7,208
convenienty is not worth a grand!
Using all tooling in collets works well, especially if you try to use only a couple diameters of shanks (like 3/8 and 5/8") for the bulk of the tooling. You will save time by not having to change collets. The shanks can also be short, only about an inch to inch and a quarter long, and that also helps to gets tooling in and out of setups without constantly moving the table or quill up and down. It is great for drill chucks, boring heads, and similar tooling, and it also saves you from buying difficult to find and relatively expensive B&S #9 shanks for all your tooling, which then become dedicated to use in the mill only. Short, straight shanks are the way to go for an inexpensive, versatile, and highly useful tooling system. The final advantage is that the straight shank tooling will also fit your next mill just as they are.
 

Latinrascalrg1

Registered
Registered
Joined
Dec 9, 2016
Messages
1,130
With a Name like Boneyard I should have known you are well versed in the laws of separation!
 

Bob Korves

H-M Supporter - Sustaining Member
H-M Platinum Supporter
Joined
Jul 2, 2014
Messages
7,208
It helps to keep the B&S collets lightly oiled. They will still grip in the spindle taper. Don't tighten them more than necessary. If you do get one stuck, support the spindle nose against the table before beating on the end of the draw bar, or you can damage the spindle bearings. A piece of tubing against the spindle and a piece of hardwood on the table works well. I am glad my Millrite has R8 instead of B&S#9, they were both options, along with several others...
 

boneyard51

Registered
Registered
Joined
Mar 30, 2019
Messages
71
With a Name like Boneyard I should have known you are well versed in the laws of separation!
I got that name in high school, because I was skinny and hung out at all the boneyards/salvage yards around the country side. I beat one of those afflictions .....at 240 lbs....... lol




Bones
 
It can take up to an hour for ads to appear on the page. See our code implementation guide for more details. If you already have Auto ad code on your pages there's no need to replace it with this code
Top
AdBlock Detected

We get it, advertisements are annoying!

Sure, ad-blocking software does a great job at blocking ads, but it also blocks useful features of our website. For the best site experience please disable your AdBlocker.

I've Disabled AdBlock