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[4]

What is this white substance called?

[3]
[10] Like what you see?
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tip32a

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#1
I have a general machine tool question and was looking to post it in a forum. I
registered on your service but I am not allowed to post.

What do I have to do to post a question?
Or maybe you can answer it.
The dentist uses a "carbon paper" called articulating paper or film to see where
your teeth are grinding. This is usually available in red and blue.

I have seen a white substance used in a machine shop to do the same with precision
parts. I cannot find what it is called or if maybe it was their own mixture. It
went on like white out but quickly dried to a white chalk that could be easily wiped
away.

I was thinking it was liquid gym chalk but that goes on too thin. This went on like
whiteout.

Thanks Tom..
 

MrWhoopee

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#2
Hi-spot blue (prussian blue) is commonly used for this purpose. It does not dry. I'm not familiar with a white formulation.
 

JimDawson

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#3
I don't think I have even seen white, normally what you are describing is blue. But maybe you saw a paint pen? Much like whiteout.
 

RJSakowski

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#4
I will use a Sharpie to find high spots. I coat one part and mate the two parts with a slight movement between. The shiney spots indicate contact. Tom Lipton, Ox Tools, did a measurement in Sharpie coating thickness and found it to be less than a thousandth.
 

Richard King 2

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#6
In the past I have used white Canode die spotting ink but the Mfg. stopped making it, Old timers used white lead powder between mag chucks on a surface grinder. Years ago I used red lead as a highlighter for 2 colors when scraping ways. it was an orange color powder that we mixed with oil and thinner to make a paste we would spread on with a hard felt pad and then wiped off.
I have heard that some scrapers mixed white lead powder like I did with red lead.

Just recently I have been experimenting with a water soluble ink called Charbonnel Ink and it comes in white. I dilute it with Windex
 
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