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What lathe attachment do I need?

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tjb

Terry
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#1
I have a 13 x 40 lathe that will hold stock up to 1 1/2" in diameter. I need to face a piece of 3/4" stock and a piece of 1" stock, both of which are 2+ feet long. When I put either of them in the machine, the excessive length sticking out the back wobbles significantly. Is there an attachment I can use to lock down the stock and eliminate the wobble?

Thanks for any advice.

Best regards,
Terry
 

Ed ke6bnl

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#2
People will make an atachment for the rear of the lathe that hopefully can fit over the rear of the spindle with 4 screws around the circumference that are adjustable to center the sticking out portion of the work stock I believe it is called a spider.
 

tjb

Terry
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#3
People will make an atachment for the rear of the lathe that hopefully can fit over the rear of the spindle with 4 screws around the circumference that are adjustable to center the sticking out portion of the work stock I believe it is called a spider.
Thanks, Ed.

I'll do a search on that.

Regards,
Terry
 

RJSakowski

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#4
For one or two pieces, I would just use three or four tapered wooden shims to center and stabilize the back end of the stock.
 

tjb

Terry
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#6
Thanks, RJ.

That's a good quick-and-dirty tip to know. I'm actually right now watching a youtube video on a guy making a spider. Seems like it might be a good learning experience to make one. I'll keep you posted.

Regards,
Terry
 

tjb

Terry
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#7
Thanks, Ed.

That's actually the video I just watched! Seems pretty straightforward.

Headed back to the shop to try and butcher a little bit of scrap metal.

Regards,
Terry
 

kd4gij

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#8
Sounds like the stock is bent. I would straighten it then run it.
 

kd4gij

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#9
I made plugs from Delrin with different size wholes for my lathe.
 

tjb

Terry
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#10
I made plugs from Delrin with different size wholes for my lathe.
Now that's a good idea. Do they simply press in or did you make a retainer of some sort?

Regards,
Terry
 

kd4gij

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#11
Just a snug fit. I left a shoulder on the plug to pull it out..
 

tjb

Terry
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#12
Just a snug fit. I left a shoulder on the plug to pull it out..
Thanks. I'll try that, too. I have a piece of scrap 2 3/4" cold rolled that I've already started milling for a lathe spider. Seems like a pretty simple exercise, so I'll finish it. I also have some scrap Delrin that I could use to make plugs. I'll probably make some for the common smaller sizes (3/8" - 3/4"). Thanks for the tip.

Regards,
Terry
 

markba633csi

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#13
The quick and dirty is to just wrap some cardboard and tape around the stock to keep it from battering around in the spindle
 

Dabbler

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#15
I did the same as kd4gij, but I turned mine out of wood, usually a 2 X 4, to size. I've only needed a couple of sizes. I regularly turn 1.375" steel , 4' long suing these wooden plugs.

I can turn 3/4 " stock uip to 3' long using a wooden plug as well...

 

P. Waller

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#16
Make short spindle liners, use a piece of material (I mostly use plastic) and turn it slightly smaller then the spindle bore then bore it slightly larger then the stock and 1 1/2" long or so, drill and tap a hole through the wall. Place on stock and gently snug a set screw onto the stock.

If the wall thickness will not allow a tapped hole use a cats head setup.

This allows you to move the stock through the spindle if making multiple parts in one setup. This beats screwing around with a cats head and screws for every part.

Like so
 

Aaron_W

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#17
Perhaps my inexperience speaking, but couldn't you just use your steady rest to work further down the bed so you have less material extending through the headstock? I thought that is what the steady rest was for?
 

Dabbler

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#18
Aaron, it just takes much more time to set up your steady rest than gripping in your 3-jaw and going for it. all your are doing is reducing the 'whipping effect by using a plug. I think I've needed 3 or 4 plugs in 38 years, and they each took about 5 minutes to make.
 

P. Waller

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#19
Perhaps my inexperience speaking, but couldn't you just use your steady rest to work further down the bed so you have less material extending through the headstock? I thought that is what the steady rest was for?
Setting up a steady would be silly if all one needs to do is stabilize material that fits through the spindle bore, if the work will not pass through the spindle a steady is the only option.

As an example this part would not fit through the spindle so I had to use a steady to turn the section that was welded for repair. I also made a center plug for the bore in the end and used a live center in tail stock.

It turned out reasonably well considering the amount of weld that they put on it.
3.147" is 79.93 MM for an 80 MM bearing fit. The material is 304/316 stainless, the Customer was not sure.



 

tjb

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#20
Sounds like there's definitely more than one way to skin this cat. Thanks for all the answers and great ideas.

Regards,
Terry
 

epanzella

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#21
For a quick job I stuff some paper towels around a long shaft to stop wobble. That said it seems odd the 3/4 and 1 inch shafting only 2 ft long would flex enough to be a problem.
 

savarin

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#22
I have used bicycle cables looped over the length sticking out and pinned to the wall and ceiling as guy ropes, a splash of oil where they touch the shaft and it spins with no wobble.
I find this particularly useful with thin stock
 

tjb

Terry
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#23
For a quick job I stuff some paper towels around a long shaft to stop wobble. That said it seems odd the 3/4 and 1 inch shafting only 2 ft long would flex enough to be a problem.
Actually, it may not be a problem for the immediate project I'm working on. There is definite wobbling, but maybe not significant enough to cause a problem.

I have rarely work with anything longer than about 2 or 2 and a half feet, but several weeks ago, I had a longer piece of 1/2" stock in the lathe. I was facing the end when all of a sudden, the lathe starts wobbling and making a racket that sounded like a helicopter about to lift off. I slammed the lathe emergency button and went around to the outboard side. The stock had bent to 45 degrees about a foot out from the end. Luckily, nothing (and no one) was in the path of destruction when the flailing began, but now I'm a little gun shy. To me, this is a win-win: Getting some wise counsel from experts on how to avoid a catastrophe, and a learning exercise on how to make a useful lathe attachment.

Regards,
Terry
 

12bolts

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#25
Place a suitable sized sawhorse or similar near the end of your stock Nail or screw a couple of blocks of wood to cradle and bridge over the stock. Away you go.
Sounds like the stock is bent. I would straighten it then run it.
Straight or not, excess stock protruding from the rear of the spindle will wobble. It is necessary to restrain it.
I have used bicycle cables looped over the length sticking out and pinned to the wall and ceiling as guy ropes, a splash of oil where they touch the shaft......
Charles' method is also effective

Cheers Phil
 

tjb

Terry
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#26
Sounds like the stock is bent. I would straighten it then run it.
No, the stock's not bent. See my post above on the near train wreck I had with a longer piece of 1/2" stock. These two pieces are a. shorter than that one, and b. only 'wobbling'. My main objective is to learn what's available out there to avoid another potential train wreck before it happens. I just finished milling the blank for a spider. If all goes well, tomorrow I'll drill and tap for the set screws, then try it out.

Next project will be to make some Delrin plugs like you suggested.

Regards,
Terry
 

epanzella

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#27
No, the stock's not bent. See my post above on the near train wreck I had with a longer piece of 1/2" stock. These two pieces are a. shorter than that one, and b. only 'wobbling'. My main objective is to learn what's available out there to avoid another potential train wreck before it happens. I just finished milling the blank for a spider. If all goes well, tomorrow I'll drill and tap for the set screws, then try it out.

Next project will be to make some Delrin plugs like you suggested.

Regards,
Terry
Sounds like you're on the right track with the spider. Remember any fixed plugs you make will only work with a specific diameter rod whereas the spider will work with anything that fits thru the headstock and is long enough to reach it.
 

kd4gij

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#28
2" boat shaft 14ft long.

boat shaft.jpg
 

tjb

Terry
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#29
Sounds like you're on the right track with the spider. Remember any fixed plugs you make will only work with a specific diameter rod whereas the spider will work with anything that fits thru the headstock and is long enough to reach it.
Got it. Thanks.

Regards,
Terry
 
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