What type of flange to use with limited diameter and can be easily made on a lathe

GoceKU

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I've been needing to make a test bench for gearboxes, driveshafts and other driveline components. I have a big timken bearing with a 5 row pulley that i want to use, but this limits me to a shaft diameter od 30 mm (1 3/16) i need to make a flange so i can change attachments like chucks, flange plates, live centres. By my estimations i'll be putting max of 85 Nm of torque and max of 3000 Rpm. At first i thought morse taper but it will be hard to replicate for all the attachments, than i thought a straight shaft with a tapered pin, or a big thread with a flat shoulder to look again. Tell me your thoughts, experiences, any advice is much appreciated.
p15.gifimages (1).jpgflanged-Coupling-Assembly-with-3-D-Model.png
 

rock_breaker

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No real experience here, but if I understand the problem, I believe the Morse Taper may be the easiest in the long run. Once you have the correct taper setting on your lathe, you could make several tapers, leaving the large end temporarily unfinished until you need a particular supporting fixture. No doubt you will want to turn either direction so threads obviously become a problem. A plate mounted securely on the shaft (keyed & setscrews, or bolts) may give you the repeatability you may require. I believe matching tapers can be made by cutting the bore with the cutting tool upside down and working at the backside of the opening. Good Luck!
Have a good day
Ray
 

Superburban

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How about something like the love joy couplings? They allow for slight misalignment. You can get all kinds of mating parts, or even make one with three cuts on a mill. The red lines give you an idea on how the three cuts are made. You could also make something similar with pins, bolts, what ever. Maybe even something that uses those donuts couplings you used on the Nivia. I do not recall if you have a mill or not, But I have tested many transmissions (even autos), by mounting it on the table of my mill, and driving it with an adapter driven by the spindle in the horizontal position.
 

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whitmore

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I've been needing to make a test bench for gearboxes, driveshafts and other driveline components.... By my estimations i'll be putting max of 85 Nm of torque and max of 3000 Rpm. At first i thought morse taper but ...
A stub might be better than a full Morse taper, and releasing the taper coupling will be an issue. Could you just
use a three-jaw chuck?

If your need is for unidirectional torque, of course, a threaded coupling would work, just have to shrink-fit a threaded
collar on to every shaft that comes along... coarse threads are best.

Alignment is always a problem, but might be solved with a flexible shaft behind a rigid coupling.
 

GoceKU

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I Don't think a love joint could be used, or a flex disc from a car's driveshaft. This bearing should support the parts from one end so a solid connection is needed, it can experience a vibration, so a taper like MT3 seams a bit risky also using a hammer and a drift to knock it out will bend it over time.
images (2).jpg
 

dirty tools

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Make the body to use thru bolts to hold the flangers to the shafts
it is commonly used on heavy stationary equipment
you will have to notch the shafts to fit the bolts
 

whitmore

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I Don't think a love joint could be used.... This bearing should support the parts from one end so a solid connection is needed
The centering of a three-pin/three-hole coupling is automatic (regardless of slight looseness of the holes), so a six-hole
flange with three pins and three threaded holes might serve. The 'expendable' mating flanges can get hubs
with the right shrink-fit to the shafts. There are twelve-point bolts available to allow very small flange diameter,
like this <https://www.mcmaster.com/93700a212> so your holes needn't have a lot of clearance from the
hubs, and a wrench will still fit. You want pins to locate the flanges, because threaded fasteners and
holes need unacceptably high position and size tolerances.

I'd consider press-in or thread-in hubs, so you can make up dozens of flanges in advance. Weld joining of the hub
to flange seems like a good idea, or at least braze.

Lovejoy couplings are nice, but somewhat pricey.
 
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