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What Year Hlv?

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minions

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#1
b3e08d5f71c1fcdf3d163adf213cd638.jpg

upload_2016-9-16_8-21-23.png

I saw this Hardinge HLV on a local ad- seller says its from the 1980s? was wondering if there is anyway to tell if that's accurate based on this picture? I hate to drive out 2 hours and it's not what I expect. it's listed for 5k but but its not under power, no way to turn it on. Should I pass? or good price but a risk?
 
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Bob Korves

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#2
A machine that is not under power is an unknown. The motor could be bad, the electronics as well, there could be ugly and expensive problems lurking in the headstock and carriage. A hidden serious problem can be the difference between a treasure and cast iron scrap. If you have the knowledge, skills, time, and wish to purchase a potential lemon and do what is needed to repair it, then go for it, but the price should more closely reflect scrap iron prices, not perfectly running HLV. Why should you pay good money for scrap iron that you will have to deliver home, and then take to the scrapper? You can bid it at scrap metal price plus some more if you are willing and able to part it out, or consider paying more if you can see it running and have a chance to test it to your satisfaction. That is how I would place and justify a low offer...
 

Eddyde

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I would take the drive, though not under power a lot can be ascertained by visual/physical inspection as well as meeting the seller in person. I like to ask lots of questions over the phone beforehand then ask the same questions in person, see if the answers match. Finding a good deal on the right machine takes some effort and legwork, even if you pass on this one its good experience.
 

dlane

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#4
b3e08d5f71c1fcdf3d163adf213cd638.jpg

I saw this Hardinge HLV on a local ad- seller says its from the 1980s? was wondering if there is anyway to tell if that's accurate based on this picture? I hate to drive out 2 hours and it's not what I expect. it's listed for 5k but but its not under power, no way to turn it on. Should I pass? or good price but a risk?
Bad pic, red x
 

minions

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#6
A machine that is not under power is an unknown. The motor could be bad, the electronics as well, there could be ugly and expensive problems lurking in the headstock and carriage. A hidden serious problem can be the difference between a treasure and cast iron scrap. If you have the knowledge, skills, time, and wish to purchase a potential lemon and do what is needed to repair it, then go for it, but the price should more closely reflect scrap iron prices, not perfectly running HLV. Why should you pay good money for scrap iron that you will have to deliver home, and then take to the scrapper? You can bid it at scrap metal price plus some more if you are willing and able to part it out, or consider paying more if you can see it running and have a chance to test it to your satisfaction. That is how I would place and justify a low offer...
Thank you for the sound advice. He was not very flexible on the price. My gut is telling me to pass- he didn't know much about the machine, it's not powered, and it doesn't look like an 80s hardinge to me but I might be wrong.
 

Bob Korves

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#7
Thank you for the sound advice. He was not very flexible on the price. My gut is telling me to pass- he didn't know much about the machine, it's not powered, and it doesn't look like an 80s hardinge to me but I might be wrong.
About all you can do besides forgetting about it is to make an offer that you will make you happy if it gets accepted and equally happy if it gets rejected. This is not the only lathe on the planet. I find that if I make an offer and it is rejected, I reiterate that my CASH offer is the best I can can do on what is being offered, again state the reasons why, and then I write down my name, phone number, bid price, and a date that my CASH offer is good until, subject to me purchasing something else in the meantime, and hand it to him/her. Two weeks, usually. It works more often than you might guess it should. Given the distance and your gut feeling, maybe it is best to just let this one go.
 

co1859

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#8
Minions
I purchase a non-running HLV-H #6815-P (1977) in April 2016. This is a SHORT list of things I learned and fixed. Some were very easy, others required lots of study and research.

What is the serial Number#? Note: all three should match 1)tail stock-underneath cam lock 2)End of the bed backside top of taper rail 3) Head stock above collet closer mounting holes on the top. I did not know this until after the purchase, Mine all matched.

Also get a picture of the Data plate on the control cabinet. This will give you the supply voltage needed. Mine is 230 volts 3 phase supply needed. (to size your Rotary Phase Converter)

A picture of the inside of the control cabinet, will help give clues - If you see smoke staining or drips of black /brown tar below the step down control transformer, it is burnt out! (I purchased a Cutter Hammer 230v input to 115v output off ebay $60) The local parts house wanted $350

The fuse on the 115volt side of the transformer was blowen - Not allowing current to the power feed. Replacements on ebay $10 I purchased a lot of 5, blew 3 fuses during trouble shooting. (learning curve)

Spindle lock was broken. Machined a new one on my mini lathe. Checked the spindle lock electrical interrupter switch -(location behind Hardinge plate on the front.) Mine was in the open position due to the broken spindle lock, not allowing electrical current to the machine on/off switch.

on/off switch, pilot light will not work. switch transformer burnt out. Currently working on finding replacement.

Cooling pump and lines completely packed tight with metal crud. Disassembled and cleaned.
Burnt out power feed module - Replaced with new 2016 circuit board. $60
Wires from the Master fuse block connected by one wire strand and loose. Easy fix
Removed "Custom Wiring and external 120volt outlet" from one leg of the 3 phase circuit.
Brake was completely seized up. Fixed- Disassembled and cleaned works great now.
Tail Stock off center .004" The quill lock lever nut frozen in place pulling quill to one side.
Tail Stock gib had a .005" dish in the center. Easy fix
Oiler system on carriage completely clogged in operable. DO NOT TWIST to REMOVE! broke small copper line My fault! (Learning curve)

Recommend purchase of reprint Hardinge Maintained Manual off ebay. It really helped. Every system will have to be disassembled and cleaned. My lathe is fully usable after 6 months of work.

That lathe looks older than 1980- due to the large power feed box

I would not pay 5k,, more like $2500 because it is a Major Obsolete Project Lathe, Not under power and there are many problems with it. Because; if it ran it would be a lot more money.

Expect lots of self study and research. Even the Hardinge dealers no longer carry wire diagrams. I used basic electrical knowledge and a volt meter and continuity tester. Now that I have passed the 50% mark on the learning curve. I would do it again if I found another one at the $2500 price point. give or take a few hundred..

This lathe weight is 1700 lbs. Don't forget about The Special lifting points and rigging.per the manuals, (A Jack was used for lifting in picture, check for control cabinet door damage) and transportation home.

Respectfully
co1859
 
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minions

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#9
Minions
I purchase a non-running HLV-H #6815-P (1977) in April 2016. This is a SHORT list of things I learned and fixed. Some were very easy, others required lots of study and research.

What is the serial Number#? Note: all three should match 1)tail stock-underneath cam lock 2)End of the bed backside top of taper rail 3) Head stock above collet closer mounting holes on the top. I did not know this until after the purchase, Mine all matched.

Also get a picture of the Data plate on the control cabinet. This will give you the supply voltage needed. Mine is 230 volts 3 phase supply needed. (to size your Rotary Phase Converter)

A picture of the inside of the control cabinet, will help give clues - If you see smoke staining or drips of black /brown tar below the step down control transformer, it is burnt out! (I purchased a Cutter Hammer 230v input to 115v output off ebay $60) The local parts house wanted $350

The fuse on the 115volt side of the transformer was blowen - Not allowing current to the power feed. Replacements on ebay $10 I purchased a lot of 5, blew 3 fuses during trouble shooting. (learning curve)

Spindle lock was broken. Machined a new one on my mini lathe. Checked the spindle lock electrical interrupter switch -(location behind Hardinge plate on the front.) Mine was in the open position due to the broken spindle lock, not allowing electrical current to the machine on/off switch.

on/off switch, pilot light will not work. switch transformer burnt out. Currently working on finding replacement.

Cooling pump and lines completely packed tight with metal crud. Disassembled and cleaned.
Burnt out power feed module - Replaced with new 2016 circuit board. $60
Wires from the Master fuse block connected by one wire strand and loose. Easy fix
Removed "Custom Wiring and external 120volt outlet" from one leg of the 3 phase circuit.
Brake was completely seized up. Fixed- Disassembled and cleaned works great now.
Tail Stock off center .004" The quill lock lever nut frozen in place pulling quill to one side.
Tail Stock gib had a .005" dish in the center. Easy fix
Oiler system on carriage completely clogged in operable. DO NOT TWIST to REMOVE! broke small copper line My fault! (Learning curve)

Recommend purchase of reprint Hardinge Maintained Manual off ebay. It really helped. Every system will have to be disassembled and cleaned. My lathe is fully usable after 6 months of work.

That lathe looks older than 1980- due to the large power feed box

I would not pay 5k,, more like $2500 because it is a Major Obsolete Project Lathe, Not under power and there are many problems with it. Because; if it ran it would be a lot more money.

Expect lots of self study and research. Even the Hardinge dealers no longer carry wire diagrams. I used basic electrical knowledge and a volt meter and continuity tester. Now that I have passed the 50% mark on the learning curve. I would do it again if I found another one at the $2500 price point. give or take a few hundred..

This lathe weight is 1700 lbs. Don't forget about The Special lifting points and rigging.per the manuals, (A Jack was used for lifting in picture, check for control cabinet door damage) and transportation home.

Respectfully
co1859
Thank you for the advise. I didn't buy it and it sold. He wasn't flexible on a price that seemed high to me for a lathe that was not under power. I will continue my search for a Hardinge dream lathe but i'm in no rush. Thank you again.
 

co1859

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#10
Minions.
It took me 4 years to find the right one I watched the Govt. auction sites, Ebay and Craig's list placed alerts on all of them. It is best to start preplanning your dream The right HLV-H will sell very fast. You need to be ready to move vey quickly. My HLV-H was listed for 1 hour and being looked at the next day. I told the seller I can be there in 45 min, move it and pay cash. He said come get it. That ended a 4 year plan and search.

Remember - You are competing with Professional Machine Rebuilders and Movers.

I can help you with this. If you would like

Develop a plan to move and load 1 ton lathe.
Do you have a trailer? a wheel system, rigging, Gantry crane? I put mine on a wheel system. I could use a winch, chain hoist, come a long or ratchet strap to pull it up on the trailed.
Tie down straps? I found at Home Depot, Purchased four, Used Two - ADX 27foot 3000 lbs working and 10000 lbs break
Lots of info on uTube moving machine.

Ron
 
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