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who has gone metric?

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MCRIPPPer

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#1
just want to see how many guys in the U.S. work in metric. i am committed to metric. i only own metric taps and dies, only have metric screws, only use metric tools, all the machines like mill, lathe, car, motorcycle are naturally metric (although my mill has imperial lead screws.) unfortunately i have to buy end mills and drills in fractional because it is rare to find metric versions in the u.s.

material is still fractional as well but it gets machined down anyway.



so shout out if you are metric and shame on you if your not! :nono: :lmao:
 

John Hasler

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#2
just want to see how many guys in the U.S. work in metric. i am committed to metric. i only own metric taps and dies, only have metric screws, only use metric tools, all the machines like mill, lathe, car, motorcycle are naturally metric (although my mill has imperial lead screws.) unfortunately i have to buy end mills and drills in fractional because it is rare to find metric versions in the u.s.

material is still fractional as well but it gets machined down anyway.



so shout out if you are metric and shame on you if your not! :nono: :lmao:
I'm comfortable with both systems and I'd go metric if I could but 99% of my tools (mostly old junk) are customary. If I was to win the lottery (not likely as I don't play it) perhaps I'd buy all new metric stuff.
 

uncle harry

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#3
just want to see how many guys in the U.S. work in metric. i am committed to metric. i only own metric taps and dies, only have metric screws, only use metric tools, all the machines like mill, lathe, car, motorcycle are naturally metric (although my mill has imperial lead screws.) unfortunately i have to buy end mills and drills in fractional because it is rare to find metric versions in the u.s.

material is still fractional as well but it gets machined down anyway.



so shout out if you are metric and shame on you if your not! :nono: :lmao:
Well,...Most of my iron is old and Imperial including all of the meterology stuff ('cept for the occasional digital stuff) so I guess @ age 73 I'm not hell-bent to metrify. Most of our rough carpenters still use Imperial.
 

Hawkeye

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#4
I think I'm becoming bilingual enough that if I needed to make a metric part to fit something, I could. The iGaging DROs are switchable and the Swedish lathe has metric carriage dials. My vehicles are split between miles and kilometers, so I'm always thinking both ways anyway.

For projects, though, I'll stick to SAE.

And shame on you for trying to force your choice on me. :lmao: Seriously, though, it is a choice, at least at the hobby level.

At work, the code book has metric tables, but you can't buy metric conduit here, so you have to translate.

Having said all that, metric math is a lot easier.
 

John Hasler

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Well,...Most of my iron is old and Imperial including all of the meterology stuff ('cept for the occasional digital stuff) so I guess @ age 73 I'm not hell-bent to metrify. Most of our rough carpenters still use Imperial.
I think you mean US Customary, not Imperial. The latter is what used to be used in the UK and is slightly different from the former, which is what is most commonly used here in Wisconsin.
 

jumps4

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#6
president Nixon had the right idea here in the US years ago but It never fully came about, instead we have to learn both systems, have both sets of tools and waste more time converting. Nasa crashes orbitors into mars because one company writes software in metric and the other in imperial.
metric is so easy compared to imperial all on a base of ten, not the length of some guys foot divided into 12 parts then divided by 16,32,64,1000,10,000 parts
I wish it would have all converted but I still use the inch system most of the time
steve
 

MCRIPPPer

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yea. im only 18 so im hoping its worth it to learn metric! sooner or later the U.S. will switch for real just so we can interact with the rest of the world lol.

my micrometer is imperial but a quick calculation will convert to metric. for example, i want to make a 10mm diameter on the lathe just put 10/25.4 in calculator =.3937



.3937 x 25.4 = 9.99998 mm. close enough to 10 for me!

so an imperial micrometer is just as accurate for measuring metric as imperial.


the best part about metric is you get rid of that nasty half digit on the digital calipers. Ha.




imagine a new world with no 127 tooth gears, no reversing your lathe to cut metric threads, your socket set would be 1/2 off and 1/2 times the weight! 2x more space in your tool box! one less button on caliper! you could even feel like your driving 1.6x faster! :lol:
 

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#8
You have no idea the havoc it causes in international companies. We make equipment for the oil industry and our Houston designers use ASME and we use ISO 8015 for geometric tolerances. When comparing drawings or trying to run projects over the various sites, the incompatibility of these standards means a great deal of headache.

I grew up in the 80's in Australia where there was still a great deal of SAE. I am bilingual but for machining, I stick to metric.

Paul.
 

darkzero

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#9
I haven't, my machines are import & I do try to keep all fasteners metric on them as well as anytime I make something for them. That way I only need to keep a metric set of tools close by. I used to work on imports for automotive so most of my tools are metric anyway.

Most of my measuring tools can read in metric (DRO, calipers, micrometers, depth gauge, height gauge, etc.) but I still prefer to use American standard. Even when I have to machine a metric dimension, I still convert it American standard to make the cut. I do use metric sometimes but it's not what I prefer. I also hate threading metric on the lathe, can't use the halfnuts.

As you mentioned, metric endmills are not as common here in the US. Neither are drill bits. Along with fractional drills, I also use number drills & letter drills, are there similar metric equivalents to these? I have never seen any readily available.

I do agree the metric system makes more sense & I think is easier to use. But when it comes to machining & other things I just stick with American standard, since that's what's commonly used here it makes it easier. Like if you go to the hardware store & need to buy plumbing supplies or electrical, you don't go looking for pipes in metric sizes.
 

jumps4

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#10
In the us we have probably only used the 1000th of an inch for less that 100 years, machinists measured everything in fractions of and inch and most of our tools still reflect this, fractional drills reamers ect. so we really didn't even convert out tools to 1000's of an inch yet that's only been a hundred years.
steve
 

MCRIPPPer

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i have to be good at inch pound system because it is used everywhere. at work i machine things in imperial because that's what everyone here uses, but at home, i get to use the lovely system that is SI.
 

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#12
I can work in both systems. The problem I have is that I was pretty much raised on Imperial measurements, so I think in those terms.

If someone says to me that a part is 15 1/2" long and 1/2" diameter, I immediately know what that looks like in my mind.

Now, If someone said the part is 1550mm by 14mm diameter, it means almost nothing to me. I have to refer to a metric tape measure or something to visualize what that means.

I can look at an Imperial HEX HEAD bolt and know immediately what size wrench to grab to turn it- Again, that's not the case with most metric bolts. Over the years I've gotten better at "knowing" a metric bolt size by sight, It's taken years of doing to get even a fuzzy recognition.

I think the brain gets locked into thinking in certain terms at a fairly young age, probably early 20s at the latest. After that you become kind of locked into what you learned as a youngster. I'm 49 yrs old. I suspect that most guys my age are in the same boat. :))
 

MCRIPPPer

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In the us we have probably only used the 1000th of an inch for less that 100 years, machinists measured everything in fractions of and inch and most of our tools still reflect this, fractional drills reamers ect. so we really didn't even convert out tools to 1000's of an inch yet that's only been a hundred years.
steve

this really pisses me off. especially on the milling machine when i need to find the radius of an end mill for example. the tooling is fraction and mill is decimal inch! and most of the fractions dont turn into a friendly decimal.
 

Cobra

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#14
In this country we solidly on the fence! Metric to drive or by flour, SAE to build houses, and both in machine and maintenance shops.
Overall not a big deal to adjust as you need. I think there is too much existing equipment and supplies to make a total change any time soon.
 

MCRIPPPer

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actually the one thing i think will never change is carpentry. you will never see a 50x100 in the lumber store!

although 2x4 and 4x4 means nothing anyway.
 

darkzero

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#16
I can work in both systems. The problem I have is that I was pretty much raised on Imperial measurements, so I think in those terms.

If someone says to me that a part is 15 1/2" long and 1/2" diameter, I immediately know what that looks like in my mind.

Now, If someone said the part is 1550mm by 14mm diameter, it means almost nothing to me. I have to refer to a metric tape measure or something to visualize what that means.

I can look at an Imperial HEX HEAD bolt and know immediately what size wrench to grab to turn it- Again, that's not the case with most metric bolts. Over the years I've gotten better at "knowing" a metric bolt size by sight, It's taken years of doing to get even a fuzzy recognition.

I think the brain gets locked into thinking in certain terms at a fairly young age, probably early 20s at the latest. After that you become kind of locked into what you learned as a youngster. I'm 49 yrs old. I suspect that most guys my age are in the same boat. :))
I can relate to that, when some one says a few thou or hundreths of an inch I have an idea of the size, but when some one says a few millimeters or a few tenths of a mm I have no clue.

But for me bolt heads are different, when I see one I can usually make out what size it is in both SAE & metric. That's because I used to work in automotive.
 

John Hasler

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In this country we solidly on the fence! Metric to drive or by flour, SAE to build houses, and both in machine and maintenance shops.
Overall not a big deal to adjust as you need. I think there is too much existing equipment and supplies to make a total change any time soon.
Society of Automotive Engineers to build houses?
 

darkzero

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Society of Automotive Engineers to build houses?
I used to wonder about the SAE designation for screw threads.... not sure about the building code thing, he probably just used the wrong term but we get the general idea.


United States Standard thread (USS thread), also known as Sellers Standard thread, Franklin Institute thread and American Standard thread, is a standard for inch based threaded fasteners and washers.

The USS standard is no longer supported. It, together with the SAE fastener standard, was incorporated into the Unified Thread Standard. However, the term, USS, continues to be used occasionally today to describe inch based threaded fasteners with a coarse thread pitch and inch based washers that are a little bit larger than the corresponding SAE washer. The Unified Thread Standard uses the term UNC (Unified National Coarse) to describe a fastener that previously would have been designated USS and the Unified Thread Standard uses the term UNF (Unified National Fine) to describe a fastener that would have previously been designated SAE.

SAE International, formerly the Society of Automotive Engineers, is a U.S.-based, globally active professional association and standards organization for engineering professionals in various industries.
 

MCRIPPPer

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im guessing SAE is metric now? it seems all modern cars use metric parts.
 

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I am quickly getting my metric mics and depth gauges when i can. Good news is most metric go cheap on ebayz. I have digital for 0-1 so metrics covered there. i think it is easier to "go metric" if you use CNC, since the machine can quickly convert. the parts i am planning to make are metric, and it was a bit of effort to wrap my head around what 20 mm looked like size wise :rofl:
 

MCRIPPPer

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#22
Nope. Metric is metric.

well, sae is not a measurement system is it? does the society of automotive engineers use metric maybe?

not sure why people call inch-pound system SAE.
 

John Hasler

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well, sae is not a measurement system is it? does the society of automotive engineers use metric maybe?

not sure why people call inch-pound system SAE.
This is the first time I've seen it done. The proper name for the inch-pound system used in the USA is the US customary system. The one formerly used in Canada and the UK is the Imperial system. It differs from US customary in subtle and not-so-subtle ways (Imperial pints are 20 oz).
 

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#24
Nobody calls the inch-pound system itself SAE, but people often describe fine pitch inch size bolts as "SAE", because SAE set standards for them for automotive use.

As long as material suppliers sell only inch size stock, I'll be working in inches at home. At work, it's a mix. All of our product drawings are metric but all tooling and automation (my job) drawings are inch.

I find it amusing that friends in other countries buy 2x4 lumber and 1/2" copper pipe... by the meter.
 

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well, sae is not a measurement system is it? does the society of automotive engineers use metric maybe?
According to sources online, SAE is a designation that was for US standard/imperial screw threads & replaced by unified screw thread designations. Because of which many probably still tend to call these threads SAE. Sure, SAE engineers may use metric but it's not a standard they created. Common metric screw threads are ISO.


not sure why people call inch-pound system SAE.
Probably cause they don't know the proper term, usually they just mean "US system". As John mentioned earlier, the proper term for all US measurements is the US Customary Units system but you don't hear this term very much. I don't say it often either. It is not the same as the Imperial Units system although for screw threads & length measurements it's probably the same. For example an Imperial oz is not the same as an US oz but they're close.

The only real importance to me is screw threads, US & metric. I call them American (USA) standard & simply metric. With American standard threads being UNF/UNC & metric threads being ISO metric. There are other types of metric threads as there is with standard threads.
 

John Hasler

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#26
Nobody calls the inch-pound system itself SAE, but people often describe fine pitch inch size bolts as "SAE", because SAE set standards for them for automotive use.
Point. However, the original reference was to the building trades.
 
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#27
Do you guys have any idea just how tempting it was to respond in this post by saying only this:



Metric?? What in blazes is 'metric'?? :noidea:




He heeeee.....


:gtg:
 

mattthemuppet2

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I'm all confused at the best of times, but I'm starting to learn US SAE having been metric (to Imperial parents) most of my life. The thing I struggle with is figuring out what fractional drill or end mill is bigger or smaller than another. 5/64 vs. 3/32 is easy, just multiply the latter by two and 6 is bigger than 5. But what about 9/64 and 1/8? And so on. I'm crap at math and for big numbers I have to take my gloves AND socks off!
 
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#29
28951640.jpg :roflmao:

28951640.jpg
 

uncle harry

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Society of Automotive Engineers to build houses?
I was wondering how long someone on here recognized what SAE really stands, ( or used to ) stand for. LOL &,..... Autocad uses imperial or metric to designate the choice of drawing formats.

Numbers are readily converted between systems with the new technology (pocket calculators, cad-cam etc,) The US is behind the norm but, with any luck, we'll survive all of this.
 
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