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Who made this lathe and where do I find the parts?

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Truebane

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#1
So, my dad bought this off of a local jeweler/blacksmith 20+ years ago. I know from reading here that it is a Watch/clock makers lathe. The wheel thingy that I assume is the faceplate (because of the taper that fits the front of the headstock so well) says "German" and is 40 tpi. Yes, there is some other stuff there as well, but it looks like the previous owner added it...

So, even if no one has a clue "what" it is, where do I find some parts I can mod to fit it?:))

Oh, and the whole thing is about a foot long. should have said that earlier...

Thanks
Karl
IMG_1276.JPG IMG_1277.JPG IMG_1278.JPG IMG_1281.JPG IMG_1279.JPG IMG_1283.JPG

IMG_1276.JPG IMG_1277.JPG IMG_1278.JPG IMG_1279.JPG IMG_1281.JPG IMG_1283.JPG
 

Daver

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#2
I know nothing about that lathe, or who made it. But polish that sucker up and it would be the best damn looking paperweight/desk art I have ever seen!

:man:
 

Rbeckett

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#3
Cant help with a manufacturer either, but you might look up jewelers and watchmakers lathes on Google and see if you can find one that is similar. Then by process of elimination you can probably figger out who built it, then you might be able to pursue parts and additional info. That could be a real find if it was polished up and had some tooling. It definitely looks to be after the turn of the century, but I think not too far into the 1900's. I am just guessing though. Keep us filled in on what you find, I would like to know who built it too. I love neat little tools like that.

Bob
 

mckay3d

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#4
Hi,
Unless there is something on the headstock or the end of the lathe bed it is hard to tell the maker. Most of the German made watchmaker's lathes like Boley had beds that were about 11" long while the American Watchtool (later named Derbyshire) and some other American lathes had 12" beds. The American type of WW (Webster Whitcomb) type of lathe was invented in the 19th century and many lathe companies adopted that style. If you "Google" Watchmaker Lathe" you will find a lot of info. Although your faceplate is German it would also fit American lathes. If you can lay out all the "stuff" that came with your lathe perhaps I can identify some of it for you.
From your picture it would seem that you are missing a tool rest and draw bar at the least.
Maurice
 

OldMachinist

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#5
Clean up the end of the bed and see if it says anything.

wl.JPG

wl.JPG
 

Truebane

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#6
...how do I go about cleaning my "new" paperweight without messing it up? I will look up pics on google and see what I can find for matches. and it is missing a tool rest and draw bar and motor etc.

Karl
 

Bill C.

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#7
...how do I go about cleaning my "new" paperweight without messing it up? I will look up pics on google and see what I can find for matches. and it is missing a tool rest and draw bar and motor etc.

Karl
You could try scotchbrit pad and WD40 to clean up the end of the bed to see if there are any markings. It does look good. You can always rig up a motor and belt to drive it.
 

toag

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#8
i'd go with steel wool and wd-40. scotch brite can be pretty darn aggresive

so it looks like either a Kampe http://www.lathes.co.uk/kampe/
or a derbyshire... kinda. the base is a rebuild, and i don't know about the faceplate, it could be an add on from another lathe.
 

Truebane

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#9
So I discovered a few things today upon cleaning it:
1. The Lathe Bed is a remake. The dead giveaway, aside from the tooling marks the cleaning showed was the almost legible "Hardware Hank" price tag under some masking tape!
2. The head stock (and tail stock I think) are from a Derbishire WW Lathe. Just missing a couple bits.
3. I hate Brasso. I already knew that, just thought I would mention it tho.

Thanks for help folks! Now, where do I find parts?

Karl
 

kd4gij

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#10
Ebay is your best bet for parts. Most parts are interchangeble. You can make alot of what you need.
 

Truebane

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#11
Ebay is your best bet for parts. Most parts are interchangeble. You can make alot of what you need.
Ebay. Check.

What is this "Make" of which you speak? I keep looking for designs etc. for stuff but either they cost more than I have or are way beyond my very meager skills. Can you point me in any direction for the "Make" part of your comment?

Karl
 
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Tom Griffin

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#12
Unfortunately, if you want parts for that lathe, you'll either have to make them yourself or adapt parts form a different lathe. There were literally thousands of manufacturers of jewelers lathes like that and very few of them were around very long. The motor should be pretty easy, just use a sewing machine motor and build a wooden mount to hold it and tension the belt. Tool rests are quite common, so finding one to adapt shouldn't be too tough. The biggest challenge will likely be the collet system.

You are pretty much stuck with what you have as far as the finish is concerned. Those lathes were nickel plated and if you see rust, it means the plating is shot. You can remove the rust chemically, but the crappy plating will remain. I'm sure you can have it replated, but it would be cheaper just to buy a complete lathe in good condition. I'm leaning toward the paperweight suggestion.

Tom
 

NEL957

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#13
Karl
I am not certain but it might be a Wolf Jahn, if it is, it is a German lathe. I bought one that looks just like some of your parts. The one I have has been abused and shows how people can be cruel to things they know nothing about. They pulled the tail stock center out and used it as a punch. Sad but I think it was worth the $49.00 I paid for it.
 

bfd

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#14
haps semichrome polish (auto parts store) should polish it up nicely, try boley that's what is says on mine. I got parts from the jewelry district downtown los angles but that was 35 years ago
 

Uglydog

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#15
One of our members has one. Or at least it looks very similar. Dean does watches and clocks.
We've talked about it. Please consider not messing with it until you know exactly how to get her operable.
I can't remember Deans HM user name.
I emailed him to encourage him to catch this thread.

Daryl
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NEL957

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#16
Karl
Have you found any info on your jeweler lathe? The finish is toast it is a very thin coat of chrome and when neglected, they will start to break down and the finish will start pitting and even peal. \
Here is a place that sell parts:
http://daveswatchparts.com/LatheTools.html
Scan down almost to the bottom to item #wt4746. This is the base that your lathe was made with not the one on your lathe. Tool at the top of the page you will see what your lathe could be worth. Both lathes have the tool post, they are called flip top because you can flip it out of your way when not needed.
 

Uglydog

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#17
Yes, I remember Dean saying he had his replated.

Daryl
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NEL957

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#18
Here is a picture of a Wolf Jahn:
img20.jpg
Wolf Jahn WW 6.5 mm watchmakers' lathe in the maker's fitted box

Look at the pretty mint green.
 

ziegedw

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#19
Karl,

As was mentioned earlier, the name should be stamped into the end of the bed and the headstock frame, look there to see if you can read it.

It appears to be an American Watchmakers Lathe "WW style" with the headstock and tailstock indexing on the outer "V" part of the bed, but other lathe manufacturers used this "WW style" also.

Typically these have an 8 mm collet chuck opening in the spindle, you can measure that to confirm.

As for restoring, the lathe was nickel plated when new, not chrome plated, and this is rather difficult to have done today, as most places stopped this process because of restrictive EPA regulations.

To clean it up you can take it all apart and soak it in a de-rusting solution like Evapo-Rust, or a dilute solution (2 tablespoons per gal.) of Rust Out and water Watch it every hour as it may start to turn dark black if left in too long. Then use a soft bristle SS wire brush to clean off the softened rust or #0000 steel wool.

If you want to polish it you can use 1200 - 6000 grit wet/dry paper to smooth out the castings and plating edges so they look smooth and them polish with Simichrome Polish or similar metal polish.

As for missing parts, ebay would be a source, otherwise, you can make them if you have access to another lathe.
That is the greatest feature of a lathe, it is a tool that can make itself.

These lathes are smooth operating and can be restored to turn very accurate parts if you have the patience and skill to work a hand graver or can find a cross slide to fit the lathe bed at a reasonable price.

If you have more questions, email me offline at: ziegedw@gmail.com

Dean Z.
 

chipmaker51

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#20
I'm certainly no expert, but it looks like my d-bed peerless. You should be able to tell by looking close on the tailstock end of the bed. Mine has the manufacturer name stamped.
 
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