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Winner Yulee Sugar Mill Model

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Don B

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Absolutely amazing and wonderful work, congratulations on POTM, it's well deserved...!:))
 

Ray C

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Pretty cool, Steve -but... I'm pretty sure it's illegal to use a CNC machine to re-create old things :roflmao:


Congrats!



Ray
 

Philco

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Steve this is truly some amazing work & craftsmanship. I was thinking as I was reading this thread of how many people in the future will get their interest sparked to learn the machinist skills & start doing hobby machining.
I'm with Marco on the picture board along with all the videos that you have & putting them on display at the museum. This would reveal the amount of work & dedication that you have put into this project.
I'm sure in the future there will be some little kid that will come through the museum & see the hand made model & get the machinist seed planted in his mind.
Thank you for the time & dedication that you have put into this fascinating project.
Phil.
 

Kevinb71

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Very nice work Steve and congratulations on POM!
 

jumps4

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Thank you Mike, Don, Marco, Ray and Phil
when my friends and neighbors see the model in person they really don't understand it, most ask why did you build that, what it does or what I'm going to use it for. The only people who do understand are the hobby machinist and real professionals. The most fascinating parts of this model to watch to me are located on the main part of the engine, the cylinder, connecting rod, flywheel, valve linkage and fly-ball governors bevel gears and linkages. those parts are all hand made.
The majority of the time It has taken to complete this model was not spent making parts but learning how to make the parts, tools, fixtures and use them to make the parts, studying thousands of photos to determine what it would have looked like and how it would have worked in the late 1840's.
I would build a few parts then put it away again so I didn't screw it up trying to finish without the skills I needed to finish it right. A good example are the gears, I could not just order an involute gear cutter to make what I needed. the gears had to be an exact size to fit the scale of the model with the same number of teeth as the original mill. this required me to learn how to draw the gear, scale it to the right size to get the correct profile of the tooth, then turn a cutter to fit the space in between each tooth to remove the metal. for me it was learning a new skill for each part and that's where all the time went.
there was 3 years or more before I had completed enough parts to see if it would even run. when I would get stuck on something I'd work on something else. the fly-ball governor that is on the mill is a culmination of several failed attempts.
It may be strange to some that the real value of the model to me is not the model itself but the skills acquired to bring it to completion. I'm giving the model away but I get to keep the skills for as long as I can still use them.
Steve
 

mgalusha

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Haven't been on the site in a few days and I see POTM banner with this, well deserved and some seriously amazing work. :man:
 

jumps4

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I just sent an email to the historical society in Homosassa Fl. to donate it to their museum. Waiting to see if the funny men in white coats show up with a nice jacket for me?
Thanks again everyone
steve
 

Marco Bernardini

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Steve, I bet the guys in white coats will be CNN cameramen!
The presentation of a model like yours deserve to be broadcast (it will also be a good promotion for the museum, BTW: I hope they have a clever press agent).
 

Rbeckett

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Congrats on POTM Steve. You always turn out some pretty stuff so I am not surprised at how pretty the mill really is. Hope it gets into the Museum where it can be appreciated by many.

Bob
 

woodtickgreg

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Congratulations on ptom, it is so very deserved. I have very much enjoyed following along and watching this build. Excellent workmanship! And to see it running was very cool. Thanks so much for all your effort posting this.
 

7HC

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Congratulations Steve....... A well deserved win!

Excellent working model.....I imagine as much time must have gone into the initial research as into its construction.
I'm looking forward to seeing it taking pride of place in the museum in the near future.

M
 

Just Startin'

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Congratulations Steve, what a fantastic model. Hope I have a chance to get back down that way someday and get to see your work up close and the original. You are right about the learning new things, that is what I am enjoying the most about this hobby.
:thumbzup3:
 

jumps4

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thanks everyone
I'm still waiting on a reply from the Historical society , I guess they don't check their email
I'd like to find a home for the model so I can start on something new.
I have been looking for ideas but nothing yet...
steve
 
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Congratulations Steve. Well earned recognition.

"Billy G"
 

gbritnell

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What a truly remarkable undertaking and result! This is more than a model engine it's a wonderful link to a bygone era.
Thanks for posting the journey.
gbritnell
 

Hawkeye

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thanks everyone

I have been looking for ideas but nothing yet...
steve
Were there any steam boats working the coast in your area? Are there any still in existence that you could visit and document the engines and boilers? I'm thinking of building the engines and boiler from a sternwheeler that used to run on our lake. Not the whole ship.
 

jumps4

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there were a lot of them in the 1800's because almost everything was swamp, and there were very few roads but nothing now. the saltwater probably ate them pretty quick. what was your lake steamer like the paddle wheelers here had the cylinder turning the paddle wheel like it is the crankshaft. to build a running model would require building the paddle wheel also. they didn't use propellers here because of shallow waters. the boats were flat bottomed and operated in less than 3 foot of water inshore.
steve
 

12bolts

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Steve, if you wanted to stick with the sugar theme, they may have used steam locos to haul the cane to the mill, (they did here and they are dinky little locos, they still have an operational restored one here. Or a steam traction engine as used by the farmers.........

Cheers Phil
 

jumps4

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I purchased a display cabinet this week that looks like it is going to work ok. the cabinet is 3' long 3' tall and 2 foot deep all glass with a wood frame. I will install the compressor under the mill out of site.
I took a pop up camper in for free, I was going to scrap it. the roof ac leaked and every piece of wood in it fell apart. I removed all the wood with a broom and shovel. the cabinet frames were metal and still ok and the linoleum protected the floor so I gutted it out and replaced all the wood. I bought a sewing machine and repaired the canvas and it is coming out ok. another skill I had to learn... I need to catch up on my photo taking of the mill project and the camper and post them.

I built the silent compressor for the mill with the pressure controller and safety valve and it is so quiet you cant hear it run. It will cycle with the mill running continuously but I'm installing a momentary switch to run the mill only when you hold the button.
as far as the next project I'm thinking about building a small cnc surface/contour grinder, I already have the motors, electronics, ball screws and a large X/Y table.
Thanks for offering ideas
the steam tractors and locomotives are interesting, I have grandsons that will be old enough for go carts soon also. my oldest sons last go cart was 650cc 110hp Jet-ski engine. water cooled, it's still in the shed also. It was too scary to drive, you had to let off or the cart would not turn a sharp corner. I built it all out of aluminum and it didn't weight enough to keep the front end down even with the driver and engine, everything in front of the rear wheels a mid engine configuration.
Steve
 

JimDawson

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my oldest sons last go cart was 650cc 110hp Jet-ski engine. water cooled, it's still in the shed also. It was too scary to drive, you had to let off or the cart would not turn a sharp corner. I built it all out of aluminum and it didn't weight enough to keep the front end down even with the driver and engine, everything in front of the rear wheels a mid engine configuration.
Steve
OOPS :bitingnails:That thing sounds like fun. I'm looking forward to following you next project.
 

woodtickgreg

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Oh wow, I'd like to see that go cart. I dig anything with a engine in it, especially 2 strokes. LOL
 

Hawkeye

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Steve, the steamer in question was the SS Sicamous, owned by the Canadian Pacific Railway. It was a sternwheeler with two pistons connected to cranks at each end of the wheel axle.

http://sssicamous.ca/

If you go to the History page, the fourth photo down shows the CN No. 6. I have an RC model I built of that one some years ago.
 

hukcats1

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I hope that you don't get tired of hearing it, but fantastic work. When I grow up, I want to be like you.:man:
 

jumps4

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sorry for not replying sooner
I'm not getting email notification again
I have been busy rebuilding a pop up camper for this years 4000 mile vacation
Thanks for your replies everyone
steve
 
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