Cutting fluid

Discussion in 'QUESTIONS & ANSWERS (Get Help Fast Here!)' started by AlanP, Jul 5, 2011.

  1. AlanP

    AlanP New Member

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    It was suggested that turning mild steel on my new toy would be better with cutting fluid, so my question is, can I make this fluid up at home, bearing in mind that I live in the UK.


    Alan
     
  2. Pacer

    Pacer Active Members Active Member

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    Alan,
    Consider that many, many of us HSM'ers dont use cutting fluid - even my highly skilled machinist friend, who has flow cooling on one lathe and a mister on his mill, seldom uses them. As dalee says, there are several alternates to the mess of coolant. Get several of those little 'drip' plastic bottles and keep kerosene, WD40, cutting oil. and anything else along that line and keep them near the mill and lathe. Definitely get some set-up to keep a good cutting oil in a container with a small brush (acid brushes over here..) to dab on the part youre working on. As he said Aluminum has different needs ... and stainless ... and brass ... you prolly oughta do a bit of research as to whats what. Basically for steel, a good cutting oil applied with the brush covers all my needs at the lathe (sulphur based if you can get it)
     
  3. Neil74

    Neil74 Active Members Active Member

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    I have always used a mixture of household grease, bacon, and kerosene. I found it in an early Machinists Handbook.
     
  4. AlanP

    AlanP New Member

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    Thanks very much for the information lads, it' much appreciated.

    Like the idea of bacon fat, means Ill have to have a bacon sarny every morning now.

    Alan
     
  5. randyjaco

    randyjaco Active Members Supporter Active Member

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    I find lard (Manteca, for our Spanish speaking friends) a great cutting agent. I mix lard and kerosene, run it thru a sieve and put it in a spray bottle. It can be dispensed with an acid brush and cup for those really stingy with a buck. It works great. A one or two pound plastic tub of lard will last years, even here in the Texas heat. After a couple of months it won't look so white and pretty, But I have yet to have it start smelling, except for the smell of kero when I mix it :)

    It is inexpensive, available at most groceries and works great. Why waste your money on the expensive synthetic stuff? "Try it, you'll like it". I use it on about any metal.
    Lard in the tub is a great tapping lubricant.

    Randy
     
  6. Cyclotronguy

    Cyclotronguy New Member

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    Re: Cutting fluid....... porky goodness

    Bacon grease EVIL..... it's heavy on salt, nasty source of corrosion. Go to the grocery and find the tub of unsalted lard...... great for steel, and any of the stringy alloys: especially for threading.

    Only down side is that bacon grease smells wonderful when machining.

    Best
    Cyclotrongy
     
  7. BRIAN

    BRIAN Global Moderator Staff Member Supporter

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    Lard is also very usefull as a lapping paste for very fine fits, down to a few Microns.

    As to cutting fluid I use Virgin olive oil Works great on steel .The fact that I have 60 olive trees has no bearing on this choice MMM!

    Regards Brian.
     
  8. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    You guys are making me hungry! Stop it! :)
     
  9. Neil74

    Neil74 Active Members Active Member

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    Olive oil Oh boy the bacon grease makes it hard enough to keep working, a little olive oil and I'd be inside snaking between cuts.I generally cut dry and let the material tell me when I need to apply a cutting oil, I've never had a problem with rust or the salt from the grease but I had never thought about it either. I also cut a lot of aluminum and the WD-40 helps with that.
     
  10. Neil74

    Neil74 Active Members Active Member

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    I prefer using the old ways rather than trusting some chemist who works for a money driven individual, too many times in my 55 years of being here I have found out their concoction is way more harmful than good. Everything the chemical company invents is a half azzed attempt at replicating mother nature or an out and out failure while trying to invent something else. The chemical companies are holding every aspect of our lives food, drugs and everything material we use in their greedy pockets. Not a day goes by where something that they claimed to be the best is pulled from the shelves because its found to be harmful, with China added to the mix, whats really more harmfull bacon grease or their mix of the day:)
     
  11. Galileu

    Galileu New Member

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    Hi,

    I can't tell you how much I've learned in this thread; I've learned to the point of being utterly confused. ::)

    If you are a hobby machinist, if you are concerned with the final result but you don't care whether it takes you 2 minutes or half an hour to get them, if you are restricted to brushing your cooling fluid on the workpiece, what is the advice?

    I would like to have just 2 fluids, one for steel and the other one for aluminium. I know there are many different steel and aluminium alloys but I don't usually know which one I am using since my stock comes quite often from scrapped parts. So, please, could someone summarize the basics of cutting fluid for HSM?

    Thanks,
    José
     
  12. Nels

    Nels Founder Staff Member Administrator

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    I've used olive oil on clocks when I was desperate and it works.

    I also used it to coat bare metal with it too- it doesn't last too long, but it does prevent rust, like any other oil. I say any port in a storm.


    Best,


    Nelson
     
  13. Neil74

    Neil74 Active Members Active Member

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    I too get most of my material from scrap yards so I let the material let me know what I need by way of cutter and feed rates. If after a minor adjustment and an attempt at using cutting fluid I am still having trouble, I will sometimes remove the stock and mark it as hard and unknown to save for another day or job. My Monarch has no chip tray so I try to avoid a wet stinking mess and just brush on enough to do the job and no more. I apologize if my post caused anyone any confusion, good luck with your projects.
     
  14. Neil74

    Neil74 Active Members Active Member

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    I guess if we were looking for something to permanently bond and remain sticky we could always try melting one of those peeps they sell at Easter time, it would also be a nice pink color so we'd know if we had used it or not.
     
  15. Neil74

    Neil74 Active Members Active Member

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    I just pour my cooking grease and oil into a can, also bacon grease. I make sure their are no big bits of meat or other food scraps and mix with kerosene. May be bad for me I don't know, I know it works and I always have a new supply as needed. I did a quick search on Google and came up with this site here, to make your own. I guess its not for everyone but been working for me for 20 years at home.
    http://www.grandpappy.info/wclarify.htm
     
  16. November X-ray

    November X-ray Active Members Active Member

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    My Ex-Wife has a unexhaustible supply of Lard adhered to her hips!

    Seriously though, I have a machining handbook book somewhere that talks about using transmission fluid and kerosene in a 50/50 mix. However I think it was the transmission fluid that used to be made from whale blubber and that has long since been gone!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2011
  17. Galileu

    Galileu New Member

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    Best advice so far! That's what I'm going to try. 8)

    José
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 20, 2011
  18. hermetic

    hermetic Active Members Active Member

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    I used some stuff when I was an electrical engineering apprentice in the sixties. It was a brown grease we applied to the ends of steel conduit before hand threading with die stocks, It gave of a strong gingery smell and the threads were perfect every time. Anyone any ideas what it could have been? I think it would be excellent for threading steel on the lathe.
    Phil
     
  19. Tony Wells

    Tony Wells Administrator Staff Member Administrator

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    Too smokey for me. And there is a fire risk with any flammable liquid in the pan of a sump system.

    As far as refrigerating the coolant, the only benefit I am aware of would be to maintain the initial sump temperature. The curve from, say, 40 to ambient is shallow compared to the curve from ambient to tool temp, which can be quite high. Once you reach a critical temperature on the sump, you do lose some cooling effect on the work. Boiling water temperature will make your parts grow, and is undesirable. This is generally only a problem in small sumps or long, sustained operations.
     

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