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[4]

Does This Type Of Boring Bar Have A Common Name?

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Dan_S

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#1
I'm looking at getting some of these for an upcoming project, but I can only find them from on retailer. The shank is the same diameter along its entire length, but is smaller than the head. So like an insert bar, you can minimize stick out to increase rigidity.

I've been searching for two days now but can't find them, is their a common name or somersetting i should be searching for?



Carbide-Multi-Extension-Boring-Bar-TiAlN-Medium-3.jpg
 

Wreck™Wreck

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#8
Solid carbide bar, not to be confused with a carbide shank insert tool.
This is a tool that is not intended for the hobbyist market, do not be surprised if you can not find the same $100.00 tooling for $15.00 at harbour freight.

However several companies produce more conventional products for short runs, Accupro comes to mind, have had excellent results with their solid 1/4" shank carbide boring bars.

Good Luck
 

Dan_S

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#9
This is a tool that is not intended for the hobbyist market, do not be surprised if you can not find the same $100.00 tooling for $15.00 at harbour freight.
Mari tools is charging $68 for a 1/2" by 4" bar, and I have no problem with the price.

I'm searching for alternatives, because I have no frame of reference with regards to pricing/availability/quality, and I'm the super stingy type of customer who won't even fork over a dollar unless I know its worth it. Basically I want to make sure I'm making a well informed purchase.

This is for my next project, that's going to require me to bore out a hole at the mill that's 2-1/2" deep by 15/16" in diameter. My Criterion takes 1/2" shank tools, and 2-1/2" worth of stick out is a lot for the wimpy necked down steel shank tools that normally get run in a boring head.


However several companies produce more conventional products for short runs, Accupro comes to mind, have had excellent results with their solid 1/4" shank carbide boring bars.
I'm familiar with Micro 100, but they are also necked down, and i was trying to avoid that if possible.
 
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