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Hf Bender To Bp Table?

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gwade

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#1
Today, I purchased one of the cheap Harbor Freight Compact Benders. Couldn't resist it at $60 with a 25% off coupon = $45. It is the bench mount model so I'm looking for something in the shop to attach it when needed. Is it a bad idea to attach it to my Bridgeport Mill table. It sure is at a convenient location.
image_18668.jpg
 

bss1

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#2
Those are handy pieces of equipment. Good score! I have a little different version of that bender from a different manufacturer. I use it quite frequently.

To answer your question, I just wouldn't. It bends metal by applied leverage and brute force. Sometimes when bending thick pieces I pull on the handle as hard as I can. I wouldn't want to lever on the mill table with that much force.

That just my 2 cents.


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brino

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#4
+1 to the "I just wouldn't".

When bending some 1/4" by 3" stainless for some table legs with a friend we had a cheater bar and both of us leaning into it to complete the bends.

I've used old automotive brake rotors for bases that I bolt to the concrete floor. Drill mounting holes thru the former braking surface. Weld one to each end of a 2x2" square steel tube. I found a stainless rod or one for cast iron worked the best (no cracks after cooling).

Although I have been considering sinking a 2" receiver into my concrete floor for quick-change bases for tools (2 benders, and a tire changer).

-brino
 
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Uglydog

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#5
A mill isn't designed for that kind of twisting motion.

Daryl
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gwade

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#6
Thanks for the advice guys. I'll find something else to mount the bender. I plan to eventually build a steel welding table and could use it. I'm afraid to mount to my plywood topped work benches for fear of ripping them apart. I may mount to a tree stump as needed until I get something better figured out.
 

f350ca

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#7
Could you make a 2 inch square tube mount and use it in the receiver hitch of a vehicle. I have two steel columns in the shop that I've welded receivers to. The ring roller, bender, tube bender, vice, rotary welding jig and what ever else slip in when I need them, then get tucked away.

Greg
 

gwade

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#8
Good idea! My shop is a 40x60 steel building with red iron columns. I don't want to drill holes in my floor as I'm constantly moving stuff around. I may be able to fabricate something and use existing column bolts that are anchored in the concrete. What angle of rotation is normally needed with one of the benders? Or how far from a wall should the unit be set-up and still have full rotational movement as-needed?
 
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woodchucker

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#10
Thanks for the advice guys. I'll find something else to mount the bender. I plan to eventually build a steel welding table and could use it. I'm afraid to mount to my plywood topped work benches for fear of ripping them apart. I may mount to a tree stump as needed until I get something better figured out.
Don't mount it to a tree stump. Endgrain does not hold screws well. And the stump is something that can be rotting beneath w/o your knowledge.
 

stupoty

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#11
If you have a well atached bench vice you could bolt a sturdy piece of angle iron to the bottom so you can clamp it.

Stuart
 

ELHEAD

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#13
Outside my forge I sunk a section of utility pole about 2 ' into the ground for my HF Beverly shear. Works great but then again it is not twisted in use. I have the same bender as yours but haven't mounted it yet. Looking for ideas too.
Dave
 

stevet

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#15
I made an elevated base for mine and clamp it to my jump shear. I haven't moved it yet.
 

terrywerm

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#16
I have the floor mount model of that bender and did not want to permanently mount it to the floor either, but I knew that it would be the best and most secure way to mount it. My son works for a masonry company, so he brought home a masonry saw and we cut out about a 12" square section of the garage floor. Next, I welded four 1/2" coupling nuts to a piece of 1/4" steel plate so that the nuts would match the mounting plate on the bender. I put a bolt in each of the coupling nuts to keep the holes plugged, then concreted the new plate into the floor with bolts just sticking up out of the concrete. Once the concrete cured, it was an easy matter to remove the bolts and fasten the bender to the floor when it was needed. When not in use, it is easily removed and the a thin 1/8" plate with smooth pins fits into the coupling nuts. This keeps stray material from getting into the holes when they are not in use. The smooth pins are also a loose enough fit that they do not rust in place in the floor either. Now anytime I want to use the bender, I simply lift up and remove the simple cover, then bolt the bender to the floor in just minutes. This method allows me to mount the bender in the middle of the floor so that there is room to work all the way around it without running into any obstacles.

I had considered mounting it with anchors, but soon realized that the method that I used would be far more robust and reliable than anchors.
 

woodchucker

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#17
sounds pretty good Terry. So after cutting the concrete, what did you do, break it all out, demo hammer, or just sledge and chisel.
How'd you protect the bolts from being concreted in?
I like your idea a lot. Seems like the best way to mount it w/o it being a perm fixture.
 

terrywerm

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#18
I guess I forgot to mention that we just broke it up with an electric jackhammer that he also brought home from work.

We actually 'hung' the plate from the top of the hole by bolting two pieces of 2"x2" lumber to the top of the coupling nuts, then set the plate into the hole. The 2x2's were longer than the hole was wide. The 2x2's were coated with standard concrete form release before being put in place. Once the concrete cured, we removed the bolts and tapped the 2x2's with a hammer to knock them loose.
 

FOMOGO

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#19
What you might consider if your space constrained, and have several different tools you might want to mount, is to do like Terry did, but install a male class 111 trailer receiver (2x2" solid bar with pin hole) in your concrete floor. Then you can build several posts from 2"id square tube to the height you want with a plate on the top end to hold whatever you want to mount to it, bender, vice, grinder, anvil, etc.. Just be sure you position it so you will have sufficient room to accommodate all of your attachments. Same idea as many welding tables employ, except vertical. Edit: See I missed the boat on that one. Guess I need to read all the posts.:) Mike
 

woodchucker

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#20
while that's a good idea Mike, I don't see it as good as the plate. The rocking that the tube in tube would do, would drive me nuts. I would rather have a solid environment.
 

pineyfolks

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#21
I have 3 plates set into my floor in various areas that I can bolt my receiver hitch post to, depending on what I have in the road at the time. I have 2 tapped holes in the post to lock it instead of using a pin to prevent it from rocking.
 

terrywerm

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#22
I also gave thought to a sleeve mount, but nixed the idea for a number of reasons:
1. I wanted my mount to be flush with the floor so that it would not be a trip hazard when not in use. A sleeve mount left flush would not allow the use of a pin to lock the tool to the mount.
2. I needed the mount to be capable of being used in a very solid and rigid manner. A sleeve mount would not provide this, as woochucker mentioned. Too much freedom of movement.
3. I wanted the mount to be quick and easy to use. Threading in four bolts, then snugging them up with a wrench takes longer than a sleeve mount, but it still does not take much time.

Problems with my mount:
1. The coupling nuts can fill up with dirt. This is easily remedied with compressed air.
2. The threads in the nuts might rust and get tight over time. It is easy to run a tap through them.
3. The coupling nuts need to have the bottoms capped in some way so that concrete does not flow up through them when you pour. Easily done when fabbing them up.
4. A person must be careful to not strip the threads out of one of the coupling nuts. Since they are 1/2" in size, I don't think this will happen very easily. The bolts never need to be tight anyway, good and snug is all that is required.

It is not perfect, but so far it works quite well and meets all of my requirements. I also have a single leg vise that I can mount there. It is really nice being able to work all the way around a vise on some projects. I've been thinking about making a small (24"x24") welding table that will mount there also. With just one central leg, there would be little to get in the way of odd shaped projects. The only drawback is that I have found that it would be nice to be able to mount more than one tool at a time, so plans are to make and install three more mounts this coming summer. If I only put in one or two, you know darn well that I will eventually need four!
 

woodchucker

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#23
So Terry,
did you weld rebar to the plate and make a J so that the plate is held in really good.
Did you use rebar to join the new concrete to the old? (drilled sideways to connect). As concrete does not bond well to concrete a mechanical bond is probably a good idea. Concrete bonds to metal better than concrete.. go figure.
 

terrywerm

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#24
Nope. I added some 1 1/2" angle iron from an old bed frame that I had laying around. Welded four pieces on end to the bottom of the plate, each leg sticking down at an angle so that it sort of looked like a four legged stool. I placed the angles with the bottom of the 'vee' pointed downward (if that makes any sense) so that the angles would not trap any air when plunged into the wet concrete. I also drilled some holes in the plate so that no air would be trapped under it. Instead of using rebar to tie the new concrete to the old, I just dug out some of the sand under the slab a little deeper, slightly undermining the existing slab. Poured the concrete in the hole, worked some of the 'cream' to the top, then worked the plate and legs into the concrete, setting it in place with the previously mentioned pieces of 2x2. It worked out quite well I thought. The attached drawing is not to scale, but gives you a pretty good idea of what I did. The only part that shows on the floor surface is the tops of the four coupling nuts.
Concrete mounting plate.JPG
 
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