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Impact Socket

ddickey

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#1
Would I be able to turn and drill/tap an impact socket? The brand is Masterforce from Menards, the description says nothing about being heat treated. I'd like a hex holder for my tailstock round die holder.
 

john.oliver35

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#2
ddickey,

You probably can - I made a spanner from a cheap Home Depot impact socket last year. This was to re-install the bearing on my Rockwell mill, which was torn apart, so I milled this socket with my little Sherline mill! Less than .010" DOC and it took forever, but did it with a HSS end mill.
20170107_180528.jpg
 

Bob Korves

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#3
Impact sockets are heat treated, but are not especially hard, instead they are tempered to a very tough state so they will not be brittle and crack under the pounding. They are machinable but will probably require carbide tooling. A good surface finish might be difficult. Tapping might also be difficult, choose a smaller percentage of thread depth like perhaps 55%. Those are general guidelines as I see them, but there are lots of tool makers out there, and their products are not all the same, sometimes by wide margins...
 

Ulma Doctor

Infinitely Curious
Active Member
#4
HF impact sockets cut like butter with HSS tooling, the masterforce brand may be similar
as Bob said they are not hard, but they are varying degrees of tough between manufacturers
i have not tried to tap them, but i'd consider other methods unless tapping was the very last option (or something i'd have to prove to myself ;))

in my experience, the less expensive sockets don't have a very long service life, post modification.
but i expect that in the first place, and am rarely let down:)
 

ddickey

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#5
Thanks for the replies. I ended up taking apart a hand hex die holder and turning it down on the lathe. Then I made a piece that fits into my current round die holder that holds the hex. Came out pretty good. The only thing that really stunk was the material I had was a 2.5" round aluminum. There is an enormous amount of chips or stringy fries out in my garage.
 

davidh

Active User
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#7
i have turned down many large socket outer diameters for clearance reasons. sharp tools, great results. . .
 
Last edited:

GSWayne

Iron
Registered Member
#9
I have drilled tapped and welded some Thorsen sockets to make die holders. I think they were impact sockets based on the wall thickness.