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My Logan 12x24 lathe project

Rennkafer

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#1
I picked up a Logan 12 x 24 lathe in January just before I left for a 3 month work assignment in Japan. Had just enough time to clean the main machine ways and go over it to see what it needed before I left and ordered parts while I as gone. Found it on Craigslist, they guy had bought it intending to teach himself machine work, replaced the 440 3 phase motor with a 220 single phase (2hp), then never hooked it up. Sat for 8 years in his wood shop that way.

This is where I found it...

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A bit of cleaning got it to here, which is where I left it while I was gone...

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The last couple days I disassembled, cleaned, and reassembled the taper attachment...

Before:

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After:

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Tonight I started on the saddle/crosslide...

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- - - Updated - - -

Oh, and the day I got back from Japan I picked this up... because I need more projects :rofl:

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This will be another thread though...
 

110octane

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#2
Nice find. Very light tailstock for a 12". Looks almost like a second operation lathe (or they had turret in mind). Logan is a good lathe. The headstocks are well designed.
Enjoy! Geoff
 

Rennkafer

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#3
They did offer a couple other tailstocks for that particular machine Geoff, including a turret. This one is a little light duty but I mostly turn aluminum so it won't get worked very hard most of the time.
 

Rennkafer

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#4
Finished cleaning up the saddle and cross slide today and got them installed back on the ways with new wipers and the taper attachment.

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Next up... the compound. Pretty grungy like the rest of this thing, but in basically decent shape.

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Rennkafer

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#7
It's currently in progress, Robert and the pics are up to date with what I've finished... I'll keep posting pics as I get more accomplished.
 

Rennkafer

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#9
Thanks Paul, the lathe is coming along nicely. The mill... the column/knee are in decent shape as is the top of the head. The quill assembly needs a complete rebuild though, as some hack had a go at it before I got it. They weren't bright enough to pull the set screw on the bottom of the quill and took most of the threads off of the end cap (quill is fine, fortunately) and they'd replaced the bearings with regular ball bearings, not the correct angular contact bearings. I'll be making a large parts order on that machine, but I'll have a completely rebuilt head.
 

Rennkafer

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#11
Well now I really screwed up...

Thought I'd do a little paint touch up after reading some other threads on here, didn't like the results so I've torn everything back down again and started painting. I was really trying to avoid that, as I don't want a museum piece that I'm afraid to get a chip on. I compromised on it though, no stripping, just some scuff/sand to deal with the bigger chips and give the old paint some tooth then new over it.

Some results...

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Saddle is off now and in process along with all of the back/side covers on the head. Pics to follow.
 

Buickgsman

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#15
Thats some nice machinery you got there! I like that style taper attachment. It appears to be like the Heavy 10 taper attachment in that you can just tighten it up and start cutting a taper without having to mess with disconnecting the cross slide screw. Very nice!
Bob
 

Rennkafer

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#16
Apron gearbox is all back together... fresh paint, replaced a couple fasteners that were obviously not original.

Before (ya I know it's upside down, makes it like the after though)

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Rennkafer

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#18
Thanks for all the good words guys, it's gratifying to see others appreciate what you've done.

Now for my next trick... the disassembly/clean/paint of the quick change box. As you can see in the photos, the wood dust in this thing is just pervasive, which isn't really surprising given it was in the PO's wood shop for 8 years (sitting in the corner not running). I found a couple things wrong that I'll have to fix, the shaft the handles run on is somewhat buggered up, and one of the 22 tooth gears in the handles is missing its cast in "key" that runs in the shaft. Priced the parts already from Logan... not cheap but at least I can still get them unlike some of the other older lathes. I'm trying to decide how to paint the front at the moment, the grooves leading up to where the handles lock in obviously take some abuse so I may polish those areas up a little and leave them bare.

Pics...

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110octane

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#19
Not a great deal of wear. For my two cents of suggestion (please feel free to ignore as you deem fit) - I like your idea of polishing the groove tracks for the levers. I removed my threading chart by gently hitting the drive brads with a flat round punch. I tapped the casting for small (#5?) screws and replaced the drive brads with small brass screws. I locktited those just for safety,\.
Geoff
 

woodtickgreg

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#20
The gearbox looks pretty good, I've seen far worse, mine was dirtier. The fact that you can get new parts for your machine is pretty cool, saves a lot of time. If I was going to tear the gear box down I might just go ahead and replace the bushings while I was in there, especially if I could just order them up. I am enjoying watching what you are doing to this lathe.
 

Rennkafer

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#21
Ya, the gearbox isn't in terrible shape (and I've also seen dirtier taking apart stuff at work). The shaft the handles run on has some dinks in it that look to have been caused by lathe crashes stopping the shaft. This lathe has a "safety gear" on the input that keeps things from breaking but apparently doesn't entirely prevent damage. The lathe, having been a school machine, probably got more than its fair share of that sort of abuse being used by beginners. New parts from Logan can be a bit on the spendy side, but it's much preferable to not being able to get them at all. To give you an idea, just the new bushings for the gearbox are ~$100, the shaft and 22T gear are another ~$130. I think it will make the lathe operation enough smoother to make that worthwhile though, as the quick change box gets a pretty fair amount of use.

Geoff, I like your idea of removing the data plate, though not sure I will on this piece as it's a pretty easy one to mask. My mill project though, I'll be doing a lot of that as the scales are pretty beat up. Did you just give the brads a couple whacks with the punch them pull them with pliers or something?
 

110octane

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#22
Ya, the gearbox isn't in terrible shape (and I've also seen dirtier taking apart stuff at work). The shaft the handles run on has some dinks in it that look to have been caused by lathe crashes stopping the shaft. This lathe has a "safety gear" on the input that keeps things from breaking but apparently doesn't entirely prevent damage. The lathe, having been a school machine, probably got more than its fair share of that sort of abuse being used by beginners. New parts from Logan can be a bit on the spendy side, but it's much preferable to not being able to get them at all. To give you an idea, just the new bushings for the gearbox are ~$100, the shaft and 22T gear are another ~$130. I think it will make the lathe operation enough smoother to make that worthwhile though, as the quick change box gets a pretty fair amount of use.

Geoff, I like your idea of removing the data plate, though not sure I will on this piece as it's a pretty easy one to mask. My mill project though, I'll be doing a lot of that as the scales are pretty beat up. Did you just give the brads a couple whacks with the punch them pull them with pliers or something?
Yes, after I put some masking tape over the printed "panel", I just went around the brad head with the punch about every 45 degrees and just kept tapping. The head rose up just a little and they get loose when this happens and the brad may be prised (pry) up with a screwdriver or pulled with pliers or end nippers. It just takes a little patience. One thing, simple bushings are easy to replicate on the lathe (or a spare lathe) and if you are lucky enough to score an involute cutter of the right number, you can use the old gear as an indexing tool to cut a new gear; spur gears are the easiest to cut. Nice lathe, good luck Geoff Morgan
 

Rennkafer

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#23
Yes, after I put some masking tape over the printed "panel", I just went around the brad head with the punch about every 45 degrees and just kept tapping. The head rose up just a little and they get loose when this happens and the brad may be prised (pry) up with a screwdriver or pulled with pliers or end nippers. It just takes a little patience. One thing, simple bushings are easy to replicate on the lathe (or a spare lathe) and if you are lucky enough to score an involute cutter of the right number, you can use the old gear as an indexing tool to cut a new gear; spur gears are the easiest to cut. Nice lathe, good luck Geoff Morgan
Ah ok Geoff, that's sort of what I thought you meant, thanks for clarifying. If I had access to another lathe/mill I could make most every part I need, unfortunately I don't (can't use anything at work, Fed. Gov't gets pissy about that). My apprenticeship was served rebuilding plant equipment (lathes, mills, etc), so I did quite a lot of this sort of repair work. We never painted anything though, it just had to make accurate parts. After I quit doing that and went into car restorations I got pretty good at painting pieces, this is my first foray into combining the two.

Thanks again!
 

110octane

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#24
Well we know you don't work for the IRS! Of course, the term "government work" is reserved for the General (and his/her adjunct)! I wish I could paint better than I can. At my advancing age it's a bit like my welding somedays I can lay a respectable bead and other days it's tough to strike an arc. In my younger days I passed the ASME Section IX a couple of times, the secret there was my age, training, and good equipment with the correct settings. Using a buzz box or a cheap MIG machine requires more skill....

I have a variety of spray guns that I have collected. I've got a Binks custom special made for Mr. Binks himself (the surprise on the Binks parts guy voice when I called for a parts list was priceless - the gun was given to me as part of an old body shop that went out of business and scrapped a bunch of stuff - I had the broken handle TIG welded by an expert colleague {private industry can be a little more forgiving in some cases}. This gun gives a very nice pattern and control but wow does it eat paint. I have a big time DeVilbiss that can be configured for a remote paint tank and can throw more paint than heaving a five gallon bucket. Lately my favorite gun is a Harbor Freight (?!) HVLP hand gun. It uses compressed air as opposed to the fan style, so I don't think it is HVLP in the strictest sense. It is economical on paint and has reasonable amount of control and a decent pattern. I usually use a urethane hardener and some serious breathing protection.

Painting machinery is much more forgiving than spraying an auto, motorcycle, etc. I like the Detzler (may be PPG, just not Sherwin-Williams) brand of "Shop Line" acrylic enamels. They can be shot with or without hardener and offer a lower cost than the higher priced auto stuff. I have not tried the newer "clear coat" base coat automotive products. As I understand it the base coat does not have a great deal of sheen and when you spray the clear coat you can see the gloss develop. I think I might leave that to the professionals.

Obviously, since you have refurbished a variety of machines and machine tools, you are no neophyte as to the process! The Logan should prove to be an excellent machine. Geoff Morgan
 

stonehands

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#25
Ya, the gearbox isn't in terrible shape (and I've also seen dirtier taking apart stuff at work). The shaft the handles run on has some dinks in it that look to have been caused by lathe crashes stopping the shaft. This lathe has a "safety gear" on the input that keeps things from breaking but apparently doesn't entirely prevent damage. The lathe, having been a school machine, probably got more than its fair share of that sort of abuse being used by beginners. New parts from Logan can be a bit on the spendy side, but it's much preferable to not being able to get them at all. To give you an idea, just the new bushings for the gearbox are ~$100, the shaft and 22T gear are another ~$130. I think it will make the lathe operation enough smoother to make that worthwhile though, as the quick change box gets a pretty fair amount of use.

Geoff, I like your idea of removing the data plate, though not sure I will on this piece as it's a pretty easy one to mask. My mill project though, I'll be doing a lot of that as the scales are pretty beat up. Did you just give the brads a couple whacks with the punch them pull them with pliers or something?
Rennkafer, Great job on the re-finish, I just finished a 10" Atlas in time to sell it to a friend in order to buy a Heavy 10 that I have to do the same restoration on. It must be a middle aged, male only sickness. Like you, I thought the price of the Logan parts bordered on the spendy, I might be able to help a bit. I just went thru a 70's stash of Logan gears from a school system and there was a wire loop with 4- 22T gears with a raised key. Let me know if you havn't ordered yet. These appear to be NOS or at the least in mint condition-after 30yrs in a box it's sometimes hard to tell. Let me know.--David
 

Rennkafer

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#27
Finally had a chance to go out and clean up the good (relatively) 22 tooth gear from the QC box. If this is what you have David, I'd be interested, please PM me with what you're looking to get for one or two of the bunch you have. The other thing I haven't been able to locate so far is the "Logan" script plate that should be on the front of the headstock. If anyone has one (or knows where one may be other than Logan) please let me know.

Here's the gear pic with dimensions...

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This is the plate I'm looking for, the large "Logan" on the front of the headstock...

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Rennkafer

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#28
Got the new gears for the QC box from David yesterday and they look great, thanks so much! Now I'm just waiting for the shaft and some other bits to get here from Logan (well that and getting around to finishing repainting the QC box casting... been busy on another project).
 

OldSkull

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#29
This is mine :) And I got some spare gears....The metric combo (100/127) and the big face plate are for a Powermatic 14" Logan....I gone try to sell them to get the one for my 12" ASAP

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OldSkull

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#30
Got problem posting my reply....Anyway ...I'm happy to found a thread about a 12" Logan , I install a 1.5 3 phases motor in mine and use a VFD to control it....A bit overkill since we already got a mechanical speed control... I may convert again and use a 110/230 V single phase Baldor motor, I install a BXA phase II tools post on mine (Got it with a 30% rebate from Enco) Again ...It's a bit overkill but the price was to good to let go...^_^ I enjoy your restoration thread, I almost pay $1000 for mine 2 years ago.