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[4]

Question about Cut-Off Saws with 10 Hp motor

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GoceKU

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#1
I've been looking for a good and affordable saw, right now i only have an 4" angle grinder, looked at band saws, very expensive, looked at electric hacksaws all are worn out broken and not functional, than a friend suggested build your self an beast of an chop saw, at first i thought no way i have already couple of projects but after looking i shows that ones selling most of them are home made and are 10 times the price of the parts, so aside all other projects i'll be starting a 14" Cut-Off Saw, for the base and drive i have it all figured out, but i'll like some advice for the hold down vice, i need to be able to turn so i can cut pieces at an angle, to give you all idea i've attached a picture what it will look like.
k12ss.jpg
 

RandyM

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#2
Ever think about turning the saw and not the vise?
 

GoceKU

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#3
Yes, Randy but the weight is too much to swing around without any slop in the turning point, the motor i have is cast iron it weighs more than 110 lbs add to that and the spindle, cutting stone, guard, too much weight too attached at an single point.
 

RandyM

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#4
Just depends on how you design the pivot, a thrust bearing and couple of ball bearings, or maybe some cam follower or track bearings. You have a lot of options at this point. Good luck, I will keep tabs on your build. I really like your drill press build. Keep the projects coming, it is greatly appreciated.
 

GoceKU

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#6
Should be more than enough, here in europe we are not limited by the power company and i have 380v three phase, at that power level i don't expect the stone to even slow down on solid pieces
 

BigMo

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#7
10hp for a typical 14" cut off? WAY overkill, will need heavy wiring and circuit, not to mention motor weight will be a factor.....using a counter weight?

Sent from my SM-G900V using Tapatalk
 

Ulma Doctor

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#9
i'll take a stab at explanation of how to mount the vise and use it to cut angles.
the vise jaws will need to be mounted on a plate.
the fixed jaw (rear jaw) of the vise will need to have a single swivel point in the center of the jaw .
you'll find a convenient place to drill a secondary hole in the rear jaw to accept a pin.
you can lay out the common angles on the mounting plate, and drill more secondary holes to insert the pin into.
that will give swivel to the rear jaw and locking capabilities.

for the movable (front jaw) will need to swivel too, or you'll may wish to add that feature into the design considerations

here is what i'm trying to describe in a thread i made earlier on the repair of a powerhacksaw
there are pictures of the jet vise, maybe the ideas will inspire other ideas for you.

http://www.hobby-machinist.com/threads/twin-carbon-arc-torch.15015/
 
Last edited:

GoceKU

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#10
10hp for a typical 14" cut off? WAY overkill, will need heavy wiring and circuit, not to mention motor weight will be a factor.....using a counter weight?
WAY overkill is good when it comes to workhorse machinery, the motor is going to be used as a counter weight, as for the wiring that is the beauty of 380v because of the higher voltage it only needs 18 apms divide that by three phases only 6 amps per phase, i can use standard 5 wire cable no problem, in fact the cable and switch i used to test the motor is quite thin but rated for 10 kw, here is the motor i'm planning to use, it's an oldie but a good one real industrial motor.
DSC_0002.JPG
 

GoceKU

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#11
I apologise for being absent for so long from this thread but i've been very busy with every day stuff, in the meanwhile, i've bought and gathered materials for the table for this project, i bought 80 x 54 x 7 millimeters piece of diamond plate which i plan to use with the smooth side up for the work table of the cut off saw, then i bought couple of square tubing to use for reinforcement, i also managed to clean off the workbench and thru the week when i have time i'll be working on it.
DSC_0012.JPG
 

GoceKU

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#13
Over the week i did managed to find time and cut the tubing for the frame, then i grind down the welds, i also ground down the diamond plate flat, then clean up the rust with wire brush, then i clamp down the frame to the plate and started welding it, thru the week i'll try and finish welding it and find some tubing for the legs.
DSC_0037.JPG DSC_0038.JPG DSC_0041.JPG DSC_0044.JPG
 

GoceKU

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#14
Over the week i did managed to finish welding the saw table top, next i need to find tubing for the legs, i have some big diameter thin wall round tubing and some thick wall small diameter round tubing, but for this application i'm thinking larger diameter will make it more rigid and is heavy enough.
DSC_0007.JPG
 

GoceKU

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#16
I wanted the tubing to lay flat also my mig welder isn't the strongest machine out there and the 7 mm plate needs a lot of amperage to melt properly, this gave me the best chance for a good weld, i plan to weld two more tubes in the middle, for those i don't plan to ground the diamond plate flat.
 

Eddyde

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#17
With 10hp you could go to a larger cutting stone?
 

Chipper5783

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#18
Abrasive saws have their place, and that will always be useful.

I have a 7x12 bandsaw, a HD power hacksaw and an abrasive saw - all get used as each seems to work best for certain applications.

You may wish to recheck your motor current draw (6 amps vs 18 amps) - what it says on the nameplate is what it draws from the line when at full load.

Keep the pictures coming.
 

GoceKU

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#19
With 10hp you could go to a larger cutting stone?
Yes with that power i can use much larger stone, i'm planning this saw so i can use from 9" to 16" stones, most common size is 14" but may make two guards one for use with smaller 9" cut off wheel, because i can use much thinner 1,8mm wheel.
 

Silverbullet

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#20
Have you taken into consideration that abrasive chop saws will and do change the metals you chop. With the heat produced many if not most the structure is changed it will harden at times up to two inches or more of the steel when cut. It'll be tuff on your machining , why not make it a slow cold cut chop saw using carbide blades. Then on tool steels with coolant it will resist the hardening affects of abrasives. The saws the same just much slower to the blade . Just my thoughts on this as I've gone through the problem.
 

GoceKU

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#21
Silverbullet, the main problem with slow cold cut chop saw is how expansive and how hard are the blades to find, as for the hardening, i know what you mean, most of the small round stock i'm buying the steel place that uses cut off chop saw, but my lathe has no trouble cutting it.
 

dlane

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#22
Are you planning on a Belt drive or direct drive ? , motor rpm ? Wheel rpm ?
 

GoceKU

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#23
The plan is to use single 1/2" belt and for rpm i'm planning around 3000 rpm, maybe 3500 rpm at the cutting stone.
 

Eddyde

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#24
The plan is to use single 1/2" belt and for rpm i'm planning around 3000 rpm, maybe 3500 rpm at the cutting stone.
IMHO, I don't think a single ½" belt can effectively transfer 10 hp. That being said, I doubt the saw will require that much power.
 

Chipper5783

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#25
The plan is to use single 1/2" belt and for rpm i'm planning around 3000 rpm, maybe 3500 rpm at the cutting stone.
There are plenty of belt drive calculators on line (one used to have to go through the charts in the big Browning data book) - belt section, sheave size, rpm ---> HP.
One may be able to get a guess on the HP required by looking at the specs for various machines on line. The Kalamazoo 14" K12 is 5 HP, their 20" is 15 HP .
 

GoceKU

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#26
I did just that, and with the pulley on the motor calculated i need a 55-60mm pulley at the cutting wheel and the reason why i'm using undersized belt is sort of cheap security in case the cutting wheel gets stuck it will spin the belt won't shatter the wheel.
 

Cooter Brown

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#27
I have a Kalamazoo 14" chop saw with a 5 hp motor, I was going to build one like you but then I found one for $350
 

GoceKU

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#28
Cooter Brown, i totally agree if i could find a cheap usable machine i would just buy one, but i'm not in the US, where i live we do not have older machines just laying around and our incomes are much lower than there, the saw you've mentioned is exactly what i make in a month.
 

ericc

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#30
The extra HP could come in useful. You could use one of the harder "big boy" wheels instead of the home improvement wheels. One of my friends put such a wheel in his Milwaukee chop saw and tried to cut a 2" diameter 4140 PH round. It took almost 2 hours and countless breaker resets. It took less than an hour with a hand hacksaw. With a 7.5 HP 3 phase "real" chop saw, that cut would be finished in about a minute. Lots of sparks, though.
 
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