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MarkM

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#1
Good day all, fairly new member here and have been impressed with the mindset of this forum. No puffed chests and just people that want to get along and help each other.
Well it is time to buy a lathe. It is all I think about these days. I want to work towards a full rounded shop.
I will try to not ramble on too much but I should let you all know my intentions. I spent 14 years in the industry with a general machinist ticket having spent time in Screw Machine shops and Jobbing shops. I took a job on the east coast of Canada after a holiday. Things were swell for some time and then I had a bad accident and returned to work a year later and work was so slow I ended up taking another job on and ended up driving a Zamboni for a living for over a decade.
Been a hard year with my mother and a close friend passing away. It changed things for me and realized I want a change in my life and miss machining dearly. I am planning on moving back to the Toronto area in a few years and hope to have enough equipment to run a shop.
I don't want to borrow any money and have sold a motorcycle to help get me started with another to sell.
My plans are to get my hands back in machining and also to improve my skills over the next few years to be able to find work as a machinist if I need to. Not many arena jobs out there. Having my own equipment would enable me to challenge myself and not worry about time for a customer to improve my skills.
I am worried about retirement having spent time over seas and not paying into my pension for quite a few years. So even if it takes me ten years that's ok. It's to be a hobby shop to help out down the rd. financially and take a shot at running a shop.
I can't afford to buy pure industrial machines but feel quality can still be delivered with my budget. It is going to be a hobby for some time. Work on just setting things up over the next few years.
So I have come to ask for help on choosing a lathe. There a a few machines I am interested in. Three from Precision Matthews the pm 1236 pm 1340 gt, and the 1440gs and one from Eisen the 1440E.
Two machines from China and two from Taiwan. I believe Matts machines are better than most other imports.
I wanted a Taiwanese Machine from the start but the 1440gs has my attention with the ability to cut worms with DP and Modular threading available. Japanese NSK Spindle Bearings and some great specs with the PM name on it which to me adds some quality from what I have read.
Nothing needs to be said about the 1340gt as we all know it is a fantastic machine for what it is. Then there is the pm 1236. Ok a bit on the small side but it really does seem like a good machine that has a great reputation over the years and with 3 phase a vfd and good tooling it should be a great machine. The Eisen is another great Taiwanese machine which stretches my budget a bit. Too many things to buy.
I understand there may be some quality differences but I would be ok if the machines needed tuning. I plan to go just single phase now as my wiring to my garage is taking a fair chunk of change using Ocean Tech. cable and over building it to make sure it comes with me when I make the move. Hopefully when I do move back all I need is four walls a roof and an electrician to get me going.
The Canadian Dollar is terrible and not too concerned about using single phase now. Even if the motors went on the Chinese machines I'd be ok with that. As long as I can get there one day. Tuning it and good tooling to make them better is no problem. I just don't want a casting flaw or something terrible down the rd.
So any thoughts on these machines for my choices. The 1440gs is my first choice. I hope to order this week.
This is a huge decision for me at 49 years old. Can't go backwards at this stage.


I think in this day and age there is a niche market for a crafty machinist!
 

Kiwi Canuck

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#2
Mark, welcome to the site, you sound like you are more qualified than a lot of us to know what you want, which is a blessing and a curse at the same time I guess.

I just bought a Lathe (PM1340GT) and Mill (PM935) from PM and am very satisfied with the machines and Matt was awesome to deal with.

Having a low CAD $ sure makes it a bit of a stretch and hard to tell if it's better to wait for the rate to improve or just go for it, I just committed and paid whatever it cost once I choose which machines I was going to buy.

I looked at a few China made machines and decided to go with the Taiwanese made ones because I was concerned about fit and finish and my budget could handle the extra 25%.

I will be using my machines for work related tasks mostly but hope to do the same as you and one day have a paying hobby once I finish up with my day job.

Good luck and let us know what you choose.

David.
 

MarkM

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#3
I bet there are quite a few machinist around here that would make me look silly even though they may not have earned a dollar from it and when I say or think inferior with the Chinese machines I catch myself realizing its on an open forum and should make myself clear. I am sure they make high quality as well it just seems like a gamble, and Holy Cow that 1440 GS is a whole lot of lathe for the asking price. Like real good Value. Been Following these forums for years and I know Matt and the Pm Folks work hard for there product and customers.
The story of how the name evolved has been etched in my head for some time. Apparently The People from the factory nicknamed Matt Precision Matt for his quest for better machines thinking he was a pain and wouldn't let up. You here lots of folks happy with Grizzly as well. I believe the importer is crucial and the standard they establish over time with the factories is what counts. This is only my Opinion!
Yes that 1340gt keeps calling. I have spoke to Matt once already and he went right to it. I don't think the Gs was part of our conversation at the time. The 1440HD was and decided I don't want to deal with the weight.
 

JPigg55

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#4

wrmiller

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#5
I've not looked at the choices you listed, but if you want DP and modular threading aren't you really down to just the 1440gs? If not, I'll throw in a vote for the 1340GT just because I love mine. :D

And welcome to the forums!
 

MarkM

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#6
Thank you Jpigg55 for taking the time to look for me. I just sent them an email. I really kind of want to start new with the two principle machines of the Lathe an Mill. You never know what kind of an adventure a used machine may be. Not worried about size with a swing no less than 12. They all are pretty much even in bed width. Lean more towards a 1440 since it may do with the little more mass and capabilities.
 

MarkM

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#7
Worms are something that fascinates me and something I just want to do. If they don't have specific worm gearboxes most lathes will have some pitches that match a few leads worms require. You could always make your own dimensions and work it all out to what you may have to work with. My math is terrible right now. Trig and such. Having a specific box would be so much slicker and it threads a whole lot of threads. Over forty metric as well as Imperial threads.
 

jbolt

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#8
Mark, welcome to the forums.

I was in your shoes a year and a half a go or so. I really wanted a RML-1440 but it was just too far out of my budget. After much consideration I got down to between the PM-1440GT and the Griz G0709. The PM-1440GS was not on my radar at the time (or not yet available). Had it been it would have been my second choice over the G0709. It appears to be a solid choice and good value for the cost.

I went with the PM-1440GT due to the overall better quality, fit & finish of the Taiwan machines vs the Chinese machines. I approached my purchase as this may be the last lathe I buy so I got the best I could afford at the time. I also do some customer work part time and I have been extremely pleased with my decision.
 

richl

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#9
Well, if you do get the pm1440gs, please start a thread about it. I am very interested in it. I keep waffling back and forth over the pm1440hd, the pm1340gt and now the pm1440gs. All fine machines for different reasons.

Rich
 

MarkM

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#10
Well, finally able to have a chat with Matt. A very busy man. Seems like all arrows seem to head towards that 1340gt. Too bad it was not a few years ago with an even dollar. For a lifetime machine it's hard not to bite the bullet now. Probably learn a lot suffering through setups with milling on the lathe. Going to ponder the Cdn.$ for a day or two and get it over with. I need to sleep. Pills aren't working either.
 

MarkM

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#11
I have to admit kind thinking too that the 1440gs is a hidden gem with the upgraded Japanese spindle bearings and such. A really sweet looking machine with it's unique chip tray and what a feed/thread box! There I go again!
 

MarkM

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#12
I am bouncing a bit back and forth and still wonder about the pm1236. Seen some pretty good work on them and some Videos. Impressive. Any pm 1236 users out there with a three phase and vfd that use it quite often
I will try to not annoy you out there but I find myself going back and forth with the question of just how much I should spend. A catch 22. Save some for a roof for the garage, Tooling a Mill Drill, Windows in the house. The list goes on and then I go back in circles. I know many have gone through this so bare with me.
 

jbolt

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#13
Having used my PM-1440GT for a while now I could not do without the 2" spindle bore and the foot brake. The D1-5 spindle is a big step up over the D1-4 that I had on my old lathe. Food for thought.
 

ezduzit

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#14
If money is no object buy new. But the best way to stretch a budget is to buy a used machine, in excellent condition, with a comprehensive set of tooling.
 

MarkM

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#15
Some really good thoughts here! Thanks for all of you to take the time to post and to be genuine and interested for me.
I do think of used machines but they will be generally way heavier and with moving in a few years dollars add up quick. I live in a very small town in Atlantic Canada. Moved out here after a holiday as a Machinist. Going to be in a Metropolis in a few years where there will be plenty of great Machine Tools I'll be able to actually see. Right now I want to work on setup. Get the shop together and if someone comes great but I can't afford to buy everything so I plan to just work on things and make the tooling and go play. Even looking forward to just having a lathe for sometime with no mill. I kind of want to revisit my apprentiship old school. I think those guys were crafty. They had solutions out of brilliance. Not CAD.
I think after a few months you know what you have generally. If the lathe is a lemon you'll see that early enough so a guarantee at this stage is paramount.
 

MarkM

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#16
Its sad how I go back and forth. Really hard to spend this kind of money and not be able to see it or put my hands on it.
Have a good day all!
 

MarkM

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#17
Do I just completely blow my budget by the 1340 gt and be done with it for good and not consider another lathe and move on? Or save a bit of money and buy lath that I really like. Gs That give you quite a bit of lathe with a reputable company with a three year warantee. With some good chucks along with a vfd 3phase setup. I think would be a great machine especially with it's eight speed box. I got a call last night about my second bike a klr 650 well setup for adventure travel. Just sold a ktm 950 adventure for this lathe. If no one buys the klr by Monday it's the Gs and work towards that machine. If it's gone I going to buy the pm 1340gt.
In the end I have to make a decision and we all think different for different reasons but I would like to thank you all for your time thoughts and good nature.
Looking forward to this new adventure.
 

Kiwi Canuck

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#18
I'm sure either of those lathes will be a good trade for what you're giving up to get them, hopefully you got a good price for your 950 as they are still quite sort after.

Just checked the pricing, aren't the 1340Gt and the 1440GS similar in price for the base machine, within $500 right?

As far as a 1236 versus 1440GS, both Chinese COO, but the GS is so much more lathe for not a lot more money.

Good luck on the KLR sale.

I've got 6 bikes in the garage including a Suzuki DR650 and Suzuki VStrom 650 both setup for travel.

David.
 

MarkM

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#19
List price of those machines seem close until you add in what you get with the GS and what you don't with the GT. Add the Canadian Dollar into it then our wonderful GST tax and your almost up to 2000$ more in Monopoly money.
One thing I really consider valuable is the foot brake on the Gs. Ya I know you can get decent braking with a vfd but if the situation ever arises your foot will be better than trying to reach for the emergency stop. I will be alone so it a big consideration.
My battle is that I really like the Gs. Even love the look of it with the Handle on the chip pan and red foot brake. Wanted a 1440 from the get go. It's just that I am not a rich guy and don't really know what is ahead of me trying to get myself going. It takes huge amounts of money to be a full rounded shop. That 1340 GT has only been praised and know it is of good enough quality that it would be there for me down the rd. It takes most of my cash and then I am stagnate for some time. A small mill drill probably an rf 31. Ya I know a round column but I have a solution for that. A tormak precision grinder with some jigs and then I could at least do a bit of work and start to put some money back in.
The pm 1236 saves me a tonne of cash and I think it looks like a great machine. Some of the forums members do great work with it and have seen pro shops using them and some for over a decade and still going.
In the end I would like to have a manual and a cnc of each a lathe and mill. The pm 1236 would be a good candidate for that down the rd. A modern day Standard Modern would be my dream lathe.
Too many thoughts going on in my head. Come to the conclusion nothing is perfect.
I read some thing some time ago. A Machinist asked a forum how to get going to set up shop and one quote from a fellow who goes by the name of Wigitmaster has stuck with me. " Don't worry about perfection. Worry about progress or you'll never get off the ground" It was like a light went off. Going to put that saying in my shop so I can read it every time I walk in.
Here I am with this exact scenario.
I apologize for not proof reading a few times and you all getting more then one email. I'll be better. I just get so caught up in this and I guess a little too excited.
I am going to give myself the wkend and Monday buying a lathe.
Anyone want to buy a Klr 650 LOL
 

jbolt

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#20
Sounds like there is a GS in your future. :)

I agree 100% about the foot brake. I use mine all the time and not just for emergencies. I have electronic braking and think it is fantastic but I have had it fault and when it does it freewheels.

The pull out chip tray is also very nice to have. Makes machine cleanup easier and there is more room for swarf.

I also recently started using the coolant system. When I bought my lathe that was one of the features I wanted but when I got the lathe I was hesitant to use it thinking it would bee to much work to deal with he coolant. I have a CNC mill that uses flood coolant so I'm well versed in using it and the good and bad that can go along with it.. Well a lathe isn't nearly as messy as a mill where the spindle speeds and coolant pressure are much higher. I now find myself using a lot for certain jobs that benefit from it.

If your goal is to start doing work for pay then I think it makes sense to get a machine that has the most capability within your budget.

I struggled with spending 7K on a base model lathe and then another 3K adding a DRO, upgraded chucks and a VFD conversion. I do customer work on the side to help pay for my hobbies. The features and extended capabilities of the PM-1440GT over my old lathe that was smaller have allowed me to take on jobs I would have previously had to turn down. The lathe has essentially paid for itself at this point.

Good luck on your decision.
 

Old Squier

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#21
I've got the 1340GT. Terrific machine. It's tough to do better. Have to say, though, I would have bought the 1440GS had it been available when I bought mine.

With this said, I gotta say --as good as the PM machines are and as great as the warranty and customer service are -- if I were doing it over. I would buy a better quality used machine. I would be looking for a clean Mori, Takisawa, Graziano, SAG, Cazaneuve, Hwacheon, Blue Line, Colchester or similar.

The PMs, great as they are, are "hobby" class machines. If you aspire to do machine work for a profit, you need a serious piece of iron -- heavy, rigid, high precision.

Try to find a machine with top quality chucks, taper attachment and QCTP. Additional tooling is sometimes offered.

Go to Surplus Record .com, and Google the above brands "for sale".

Then, pick up an Abene Universal Mill (Or any one of several universals) or a decent Bridgeport or clone and you're in business.

Whatever you do, don't blow all your cash on machines. Leave a LOT of $$$ for tooling.

Best of luck to ya!

Squire



Sent Using Tapatalk - Cherokee Nation of Oklahoma, Tahlequah OK
 

MarkM

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#22
I think when it comes right down to it. The real question is should I buy that 1340 GT. I haven't heard a bad thing about it and in my head I feel it would be there for me the rest of my life if it's taken care of. The only down fall is maybe its weight, wish it threaded a few more threads, and the fact the feed box is not in an oil bath. Three phase, single phase doesn't matter right now. In the end three phase will be it but now it's the lathe I am interested in.
It has always been the machine people refer to and all have seemed satisfied.
I wish I could take the time and have the means to pick up a used machine. It would probably cost me a fair chunk of change to get it to me and moving across a few provinces in a few years is a consideration. I am not very comfortable doing it sight unseen. Your right oldsquier about spending too much money on machines as they are just half the cost. This is why I have considered the pm 1236. Not an industrial machine but what some have done with it is surprising and impressive. One of our forum members for example has mentioned his work with stainless prop shafts and for example the finish of his threads after his 3phase and vfd was great. He has done a fair bit of work on his pm1236. I've done my fair share of prop shafts and threading 316 can show signs of weakness especially on your bigger diameter courser threads. .
I haven't been able to sleep past four in the morning for some time now. It's crazy frustrating not sleeping. Get up to go to the washroom and then I start thinking about a lathe. Monday I am getting this over with.
I am leaning towards the 1340 gt. Talked to Matt again and I value his thoughts and opinion. Told him straight I'll be buying a machine from him. Day in Day out long term Yes he said go to the 1340GT.
I wish someone would chime in and talk a bit about there well setup pm 1236. The Gs may be too close to the Gt in price after getting a quote for a 1340gt. The 1236 makes enough difference I think to maybe take a chance on the Chinese machine and keep some cash back for maybe a small mill drill and some tooling.
 

Tozguy

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#23
Mark, could part of your dilema come from not having a clear objective?

The requirements for a hobby lathe versus a money making machine can be quite different. The budget required to set up shop could be quite different as well. If you plan to play in a local 'niche market' it would help to do a bit of research on the players already there and what type of work is available.

The choice between hobby or business has to made early as they lead in different directions regarding equipment and finances.
 

MarkM

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#24
I moved out here to take on a machinist job many moons ago. I am the only real machinist with a license around here. I know I can find work. The place where I used to work was too slow for a full time machinist. They have a welder that machines a bit. I spent most of my time at the mill as a mechanic. Took another job as a Zamboni driver for full time employment. I want to set up a hobby shop that will evolve into something to help out financially when I am older . It may take a decade to fill the shop. I want two principle machines a lathe a mill, some line boring equipment, a Tormak grinder and all the supporting machines like saws and such. Moving in about four years. I have a plan. Sold one of my motorcycles and another is up for sale. Need to get the house ready to sell. Want to move in a few years with a shipping container with some machines to get going. Will be moving to the Toronto area where I started my machining and know a whole whack of people in the industry plus its a huge metropolis. A great place to find a machine if I need one and I truly believe if I am willing to put the effort in it will be up to me if I am successful or not. Plenty of opportunity if person is willing. If I don't borrow I can let it grow. Might have to take on a machinist job for awhile. This is also why I want some equipment. To get my skills and math back up to snuff.
A terrible year for me. Mother passed suddenly and a good friend who is my future wifes brother passed away as well at 46 years old of a heroin overdose. I need the mental escape to help get me through these times and miss making chips.
 

Tozguy

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#25
I moved out here to take on a machinist job many moons ago. I am the only real machinist with a license around here. I know I can find work. The place where I used to work was too slow for a full time machinist.
A terrible year for me. Mother passed suddenly and a good friend who is my future wifes brother passed away as well at 46 years old of a heroin overdose. I need the mental escape to help get me through these times and miss making chips. If I don't borrow I can let it grow.

Moving in about four years. I have a plan. Will be moving to the Toronto area where I started my machining and know a whole whack of people in the industry plus its a huge metropolis. A great place to find a machine if I need one and I truly believe if I am willing to put the effort in it will be up to me if I am successful or not. Plenty of opportunity if person is willing. If I don't borrow I can let it grow. Might have to take on a machinist job for awhile. This is also why I want some equipment. To get my skills and math back up to snuff.

A great place to find a machine if I need one and I truly believe if I am willing to put the effort in it will be up to me if I am successful or not. Plenty of opportunity if person is willing.
Mark, sorry to read about your trying times. I understand now why there is a sense of urgency to your project. It sounds like you need a hobby real quick. It also sounds like you want to avoid be financially strapped which would only add to your discomfort. Fair enough.
There are better days ahead for you I am sure.

I humbly submit the following regarding the longer term:

You have been away from the machinist market for a while now. Even in a huge market like Toronto, your chances of employment would be greatest if you are qualified on modern machinery (CNC a must). There is no way you can equip yourself between now and then to update your skills by yourself on a hobby approach let alone move it all to Toronto in a few years. That's why I suggest that you separate your immediate objectives from your long term ones. A lot can happen in four years or more.

The problem with setting up your own business is that there are already a lot of people already established who won't take kindly to sharing the market with you unless it is to let you pick up the work nobody else wants. Even in large markets like Toronto you should expect awesome competition. So be diligent about separating facts from wishful thinking on getting your share.

Start by relearning the ropes. I suggest that you use your contacts to find out which employers offer training on the job, target a few of them and learn their hiring criteria. Your machinist experience would certainly be a plus on your resumé. While you are employed and secure financially, continue to evaluate the prospects of striking off on your own based on objective observations and how things look for you at that point in time.

Success in anything usually does not come without hard work. However hard work is no guarantee of success when it comes to business. Running a successful business requires smarts of a different nature. If you have never been in business for yourself you will be amazed at how much non-machining and unpleasant work there is to do.

I apologize if this is wasting your time but hopefully this might help you get some sleep, if only because it is so boring to read.
Good luck Mark.
 

MarkM

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#26
I appreciate what you say and your thoughts are much appreciated also. There is no desperation there at all I have been thinking about this for a couple years. It's time to start somewhere. A lathe is a good start. I realize it may not be a pure industrial machine. I need to be able to hit numbers. Be there down for me when I am tooled up and supported properly. The Liang Dei Taiwan machines are from a few decades ago. Not the biggest but still its there. A reliable machine to rely on if a used machine is considered since it may be a project. I'd get something huge though that was cheap and right now moving weight costs money too.
When I talk about getting my skills up to snuff I mean it's also a hobby and for fun. I want to take on some things I haven't done over the years like make a reduction box for myself..
I know cnc seems to be the be all and end all but there are plenty of things done on manual machines. I also realize cnc has to be part of the equation in this modern day of machine tools. My first five years when I went through my apprentiship was in a screw machine shop, All I could take was a General Machist app. course. No Screw Machine Course offered. So I was a cam, gear,clutches and time all those tools kinda guy. Mostly single spindle Browne and Sharpes but also some six spindle Davenports spitting out parts sometimes in four seconds but hardly past 12 to 15 with multiple slides and turning turrets with milling attachments with auto feed all timed through cams , gears , trip dogs, mechanical clutches so I kind had an attitude like who needs cnc and and only through schooling do I have the experience which is zilch so I wanna go play and retro even maybe a rong fu rf31 with the round column and run a parallel shaft in a linear bear tied to the headstock for fun. and maybe learn a few thing and the round column because there are plenty of them and I may crash so parts are plenty.
As far as making money. I have a great job and work for a great town that I don't want to give up. My shifts don't start until three in the winter with five off after nine. I used to service alot of the Aquaculture Industry and Vessels in the Area. Three Inch Propshafts through the spindle after a half hour or so of balancing the rest of it on some homemade v stands another fifteen feet or so. All manual shop. The guy I worked for was Crafty. I had respect for him. He could do work for people and save them money in the mean time. What a place to work. I came from the city, and full shops and this big garage turned into a shop with quite a few machine tools. He would go to work and I would work at his place. A feed barge would be dropped off with a crane and I'd be told new pins and bushing and not one rusty bolt was turned. Looked at it and had at her. Learned quite a bit there doing mostly one off repair work. There also the guy up the rd that needs a shaft repaired. Have a small welder and now a lathe. Plan on making my own things in the winter and hitting the flea markets in the summer. If anything it will help get the word out.
I come here to an open forum for your opinions and I know myself I may forget sometimes. I know I put myself out there and always wonder how things are taken but value everything your are all saying. It is good that the negative possibilities are put out there for me to see. So in no any way form is it taken the wrong way. In fact thank you! It is a hugely costly endeavor. That is why I want to hone my skills over time. I think I have enough on the table now but I want to be like that old crafty Scotsman I first started with. Who told me to stand and watch the machine for a month before I do anything else. I couldn't sweep the floor unless he told me to. I think there Is a market for a Crafty Machinist. Especially if the machines are paid and everything is gravy. I'll see what I end up with. With what I can put back in. Don't want to borrow money.
I'll sum it up. A while ago I read something and a Light Went On. It was a quote from a fellow that Uses the name WigitMaster. It has become my Motto. and I am so greatful for his wisdom in this saying. "Don't worry about perfection, worry about progress. Or you'll never get off the ground".
So I am going to buy the 1340gt since it is the most professional machine I can I reach. I am going to have fun along the way that is why I joined this forum. I don't want the mill Calling me four in the morning telling me they have a machine down a grab my measuring instruments and see them at the gate by 5. No I wanna play a bit too. Don't need that kinda stress again.
Thankyou All. I know I have a Journey ahead of me!
 

Tozguy

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#27
As far as making money. I have a great job and work for a great town that I don't want to give up. I don't want the mill Calling me four in the morning telling me they have a machine down a grab my measuring instruments and see them at the gate by 5. No I wanna play a bit too. Don't need that kinda stress again. I think there Is a market for a Crafty Machinist.
Ok thanks. I understand your project better now.
You have a lot more going for you there in St-Stephen than I first imagined. I feel better for you already (except for the part about moving to TO). :)
 

MarkM

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#28
After all the space out here I couldn't handle T.O. Out of the city for sure. Orillia but you never know where life may take you. I could win the lottery and buy that 16 60 Standard Modern and kick back and fly back and Visit the Girlfriends Grand Kids. I don't really want to move but I think it's the right thing to do. Grew up in North York so I better be able to escape in my own world and make some chips.
Actually working on an Older Toyota for expedition travel. Before we plant our feet in the Golden Horseshoe were going to take six months off and go travel. Shipping Container left on a friends farm.
 
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Eddyde

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#29
Hi Mark, I'm in a similar situation. I have been shopping for a "new" lathe for over a year. Ultimately I would like a used industrial grade machine in great condition at a reasonable price... so far that has been elusive... If I buy new it would be the PM 1440 GT, However, if budget gets tight the 1340 GT will suffice. I don't think you can go wrong with a PM machine.
Good luck with your endeavor.
 

MarkM

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#30
Good Morning, I'll try not to write a novel today. Can't believe how caught up in it I get and off on a ramble. Pretty much set on the 1340gt and ponder a thought that I may throw out there if I may.
The pm1236 is such a value at 2/3rds the cost of a pm1340gt with a dro. Almost as capable. It does come with a lot of stuff but most would need to be replaced but it can be done over time and understand it may need some tuning and has been proven with this setup. With 3 phase and vfd which can be done at a very reasonable cost. It would be a nice little runner I think. Don't need a vector motor with 18 speeds. It saves quite a bit which I can help gather tooling and such or put it towards a machine down the rd.
This is more like Devil's Advocate here. Pretty set on the 1340gt I thought I 'd put the thought out there for kicks and giggles.
 
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